Does Winter Running Burn More Calories?

From Triathlete.com
By Marty Munson

And other top myths and truths about running in the cold.

Winter running breeds some interesting misconceptions, so we decided to get the straight story. We enlisted the help of one of the key scientists studying cold-weather workouts: John Castellani, Ph.D., research physiologist at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, Mass. See if you can separate the truths from the lies below—and stay warm and fit all winter.

Winter running burns more calories. True or False. Sorry, put the French fries down. Unless you’re running through snow or mud, you’re not burning any more calories than when you run in any other season. Sure, research shows that shivering and very heavy clothes do cause you to burn more calories. But by “heavy clothes,” researchers are talking about army boots and hiking gear, not your winter shell with titanium thermo-regulating technology.

Cold makes you pee more, so you’re more likely to get dehydrated. True or false. Well, the first half is true: Cold can create what researchers call cold-induced diuresis (CID), meaning you pee more when your body meets cold air or water. When your skin gets cold, blood is shunted away from your skin and redirected to your core. “With more blood in the thorax, the heart says, ‘I have too much fluid on board and need to get rid of some of it,’” says Castellani. But exercise, even at a moderate intensity, prevents CID.

Moving the blood to the core also makes your body think you have enough fluids on board. You need to be smart about replacing what you’re losing, but don’t go crazy: Unless you’re overdressed, you won’t need as much water as you would on a 90-degree day with 80 percent humidity.

Read the full article here

Old Man Winter Rally & Run

Lyons

 

Bundle up and get ready to RUN and/or RIDE Colorado’s best mixed terrain. Riders – choose 50km or 100km of dirt, snow, sweat, and beer rolling through the world-famous cycling mecca of Boulder County. Runners can crush the 5.4-mile run course, a fast, flat “Best of Lyons” tour, that integrates singletrack trails, red rock canyon, and gravel paths. Everybody gets luxury aid stations with real food and hydration, a hot meal and a cold beer at the finish line, and a killer post-ride party with great music, a fire pit, and a massive raffle.

 

Event details and registration here

Ralston Creek Half Marathon & 5k

Arvada

 

The Ralston Creek Half Marathon and 5K returns in 2019, after sold out fields in the half for the past 7 years! Join us at Colorado’s Premier Winter Half Marathon, and the finale to the 2018-2019 Racing Underground winter running series.

The Ralston Creek races feature a fun winter half-marathon and 5K run conveniently located on the west side of the Denver Metro Area in Arvada, Colorado. The courses covers a scenic mix of road and bike path over rolling terrain, and an optional early start time for half-marathon runners who expect to take more than 2.5 hours to complete the course!

Event details and registration here

Series Events:

Superior Stocking Run – Dec. 16, 2018

Yeti Chase 5k/10k – Jan. 20, 2019

Ralston Creek Half Marathon & 5k – Feb. 3, 2019

 

*To the best of our abilities, this information is correct. Please check the event website for the most accurate information.

Ralston Creek Half Marathon & 5k

Arvada

 

The Ralston Creek Half Marathon and 5K returns in 2019, after sold out fields in the half for the past 7 years! Join us at Colorado’s Premier Winter Half Marathon, and the finale to the 2018-2019 Racing Underground winter running series.

The Ralston Creek races feature a fun winter half-marathon and 5K run conveniently located on the west side of the Denver Metro Area in Arvada, Colorado. The courses covers a scenic mix of road and bike path over rolling terrain, and an optional early start time for half-marathon runners who expect to take more than 2.5 hours to complete the course!

Event details and registration here

Series Events:

Superior Stocking Run – Dec. 16, 2018

Yeti Chase 5k/10k – Jan. 20, 2019

Ralston Creek Half Marathon & 5k – Feb. 3, 2019

 

*To the best of our abilities, this information is correct. Please check the event website for the most accurate information.

Stocking Run 5k

Superior

 

Join us on Sunday December 16th for a fun and festive, family-friendly 5K run and walk in the town of Superior – conveniently located off Highway 36 between Denver and Boulder. Get a head start on the holiday season with the Stocking Run!!!

All entrants will receive a red felt stocking chock-full of sponsor goodies! How fun is that!!! And stockings for kids age 8 and under will include a tiny toy!

This is also the first race in the Racing Underground winter running series. The series has been extremely popular, selling out two of the three events every year!

Event details and registration here

 

Series Events:

Superior Stocking Run – Dec. 16, 2018

Yeti Chase 5k/10k – Jan. 20, 2019

Ralston Creek Half Marathon & 5k – Feb. 3, 2019

 

 

Yeti Chase 5k/10k

Morrison

 

This 5k/10k run is brought to you by Racing Underground. Conveniently located on the scenic west side of metro Denver, Bear Creek Lake Park is known for it’s diverse bird and waterfowl population as well as stunning views of the foothills.

The 5k and 10k races wander it’s 2500 acres with a mostly flat 5K course, while the 10k throws in a few rolling hills. The race has sold out weeks before race day every year, and offers something for everyone, with Long Sleeve Technical Shirts for all participants, hot chocolate and other yummy post-race food, Free Photo Downloads, and $1,000 prize money for the top finishers!

 

Event details and registration here

Series Events:

Superior Stocking Run – Dec. 16, 2018

Yeti Chase – Jan. 20, 2019

Ralston Creek Half Marathon & 5k – Feb. 3, 2019

 

*To the best of our abilities, this information is correct. Please check the event website for the most accurate information.

 

Yeti Chase 5k/10k

Morrison

 

This 5k/10k run is brought to you by Racing Underground. Conveniently located on the scenic west side of metro Denver, Bear Creek Lake Park is known for it’s diverse bird and waterfowl population as well as stunning views of the foothills.

The 5k and 10k races wander it’s 2500 acres with a mostly flat 5K course, while the 10k throws in a few rolling hills. The race has sold out weeks before race day every year, and offers something for everyone, with Long Sleeve Technical Shirts for all participants, hot chocolate and other yummy post-race food, Free Photo Downloads, and $1,000 prize money for the top finishers!

 

Event details and registration here

Series Events:

Superior Stocking Run – Dec. 16, 2018

Yeti Chase – Jan. 20, 2019

Ralston Creek Half Marathon & 5k – Feb. 3, 2019

 

*To the best of our abilities, this information is correct. Please check the event website for the most accurate information.

 

Tri Coach Tuesday: Tips to Make Your Winter Running Less Miserable

1. Get Motivated

“Make a date to meet someone for a run,” says Jean M., a reader in Colorado. “There’s no wimping out when someone is waiting.” John Stanton, the founder of the Running Room in Edmonton, Alberta, says the club’s Wednesday and Sunday group runs are popular in winter, when the average high is 17°F. In January and February, the Running Room hosts the Hypothermic Half Marathon, which attracts 3,500 runners in 14 cities across Canada—even at temps as low as -40°F. “There’s a big, free brunch afterward,” Stanton says. “People will do anything for omelets and pancakes.” Solo? “Tell yourself that you can go back inside after five minutes if it’s really bad,” says Patti Finke, a coach in Portland, Oregon. “Usually you stay out there.” Of course, not everyone objects to winter weather. “A night run during a light snowfall is one of the most peaceful things you can experience,” says Justin Lord of Kenmore, New York.

 

2.  Arm Your Feet

 

To keep warmth in and slush out, run in shoes that have the least amount of mesh. If you have shoes with Gore-Tex uppers, all the better, says Mark Grandonico, president of the Maine Track Club in Portland. Wear socks that wick away wetness but keep your feet warm. Runner Joe McNulty of Philadelphia swears by nonitchy SmartWool socks.

 

3.  Get Dressed

image from Fix.com

You want to be warm without sweating so much you get a chill. “The rule of thumb is to dress as if it is 20 degrees warmer,” says Maine Track Club president Mark Grandonico. “You should be slightly cool when you start.” Think layers of technical fabrics, to wick sweat, with zippers at the neck and underarm area to vent air as you heat up. You’ll learn your own preferences, but readers Darrell Arribas, of Cumberland, Rhode Island, and Eric Maniloff, of Stittsville, Ontario, both helped create these general guidelines. Assume you always wear gloves or mittens and a hat.
* 30 degrees: 2 tops, 1 bottom. Long-sleeve base layer and a vest keep your core warm. Tights (or shorts, for polar bears).

* 10 to 20 degrees: 2 tops, 2 bottoms. A jacket over your base layer, and wind pants over the tights.

* 0 to 10 degrees: 3 tops, 2 bottoms. Two tops (fleece for the cold-prone) and a jacket. Windbrief for the fellas.

* Minus 10 to 0 degrees: 3 tops, 2 bottoms, extra pair of mittens, 1 scarf wrapped around mouth or a balaclava.

* Minus 20 degrees: 3 tops, 3 bottoms, 2 extra pairs of mittens, 1 balaclava, sunglasses. Or, says Arribas, “Stay inside.”

 

4.  Be Seen

 

With limited daylight, chances are you’ll be running in the dark (Alaskans, sadly, get only a few hours of dim light per day). Tall snowbanks on plowed streets make you even harder to see. Wear reflective, fluorescent gear, and don’t be shy about lighting yourself up like a Christmas tree, says RW’s own Ed Eyestone, who runs in snowy Utah. Says Adam Feerst, a coach and trail-race director in Denver, “I use a headlamp or carry a flashlight, less so I can see where I’m going and more so people can see me.”

 

5. Warm Up Prerun

 

Move around inside enough to get the blood flowing without breaking a sweat. Run up and down your stairs, use a jump rope, or do a few yoga sun salutations. A speedy house-cleaning works, too, says D. A. Reng from Kentucky. “The cold doesn’t feel so cold when you’re warm,” says Laura Salmon of Akron, Ohio. If you’re meeting a group of running buddies, don’t stand around in the cold chatting before you run. “We sit in our cars,” says Denver’s Feerst, “waiting for one person to get out before we all get out.”

 

6. Deal with Wind

 

Start your run into the wind and finish with it at your back, so the breeze doesn’t blast you after you’ve broken a sweat. To avoid a long, biting slog, you can break this into segments, running into the wind for about 10 minutes, turning around to run with the wind at your back for five minutes, and repeating. You can also seek man-made wind protection. “When we get wind here, it can be like a hurricane,” says Chuck Bartlett, the team director of Seattle’s Club Northwest. “The buildings downtown block it.” Protect exposed skin. “I use BodyGlide on my nose and on my cheeks to prevent frostbite,” says the Canadian Stanton. Other options include Vaseline (a bit messy) and Kiehl’s All-Sport Non-Freeze Face Protector.

 

7.   Forget Speed

8.  Change Quickly Postrun

9.  Deal with Rain

10. Go Someplace Warm

Original article from Runner’s World here

Additional winter running tips can be found here on FIX.com