Several Coloradans named Athletes of the Year by USA Triathlon

It is no surprise that a handful of Coloradans have landed on this list. Many triathletes and duathletes call the Centennial State their home, and we just want to recognize their accomplishments.

  • Men’s Junior Triathlete Honorable Mention: Graham Tuohy (Lakewood, CO)
  • Men’s Masters Triathlete Honorable Mention: Bob McRae (Arvada, CO)
  • Women’s Masters Triathlete Honorable Mention: Kelly Phuah (Littleton, CO) and Steph Popelar (Elizabeth, CO)
  • Women’s Off-Road Age-Group Triathlete of the Year: Deanna McCurdy (Littleton, CO)
  • Women’s Off-Road Age Group Triathlete Honorable Mention: Sharon McDowell-Larsen (Colorado Springs, CO)
  • Men’s Overall Age-Group Duathlete Honorable Mention: Keith Jackson (Loveland, CO)
  • Women’s Overall Age-Group Duathlete Honorable Mention and Women’s Junior Duathlete of the Year: Cassidy Hickey (Parker, CO)
  • Men’s Masters Duathlete Honrable Mention: Kevin Konczak (Boulder, CO)
  • Women’s Grand Masters Duathlete Honorable Mention: Valerie Eipper (Longmont, CO)
  • Women’s Great Grand Masters Duathlete Honorable Mention: Phyllis Yester (Golden, CO)
  • Men’s Olympic/ITU Triathlete of the Year: Eli Hemming (Kiowa, CO)
  • Men’s Elite Rookie of the Year: Morgan Pearson (Boulder, CO)
  • Men’s Elite Off-Road Triathlete of the Year: Josiah Middaugh (Vail, CO)

From USA Triathlon

About Athlete of the Year
Each year, elite and age-group multisport athletes are honored for their performances over the past season. USA Triathlon’s Age-Group Athletes of the Year for triathlon and duathlon are selected by the USA Triathlon Age Group Committee and USA Triathlon Duathlon Committee, respectively. USA Triathlon’s Elite Triathletes of the Year, Elite Paratriathletes of the Year and U-23 and Junior Elite Athletes of the Year are selected by the USA Triathlon Athlete Advisory Council.

Check out the full list here

USAT Off-Road Triathlon National Championships

Waco, TX

 

USA Triathlon is headed to Waco, Texas for the 2019 USA Triathlon Off-Road National Championships! Hosted at Cameron Park on June 8, the 2019 Off-Road National Championship will take your breath away as you go up and down climb after climb, in and out of cedar breaks and into dark bamboo forests. From rocks, roots, limestone ledges, tight twisty turns and short power climbs, to narrow bridges and fast descents, this course has got it all and is often considered one of the most unique courses in the country.

 

Event details and registration here

2019 Duathlon National Championships

Greenville, SC

 

USA Triathlon is pleased to offer three races in Greenville. On Saturday, April 13, the Draft-Legal Sprint National Championship will take place and on Sunday, April 14, Non-drafting Sprint and Standard National Championships will be awarded. Details on Team USA qualification for all races can be found here. Whether you are looking for the opportunity to become a national champion or simply participate in the most competitive duathlon in the U.S., this race is for you.

Nestled into the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Greenville, South Carolina has combined traditional southern charm, stunning natural beauty and an unexpected contemporary cool to create one of America’s hottest emerging destinations and fastest growing cities. Greenville boasts a revitalized, walkable downtown ranked among “America’s Ten Best” by Forbes Magazine. With a world-class collection of museums, restaurants, and theaters to some of the most beautiful lakes, rivers and mountains in the world, Greenville, South Carolina is everything you hear and more. It’s not just any Greenville, it’s Yeah, THAT Greenville!

As in past years, you can race in all three championship events. No qualification is required to participate in any of the three events.

 

Event details and registration here

Collegiate Club National Championships

Tempe, AZ

 

USA Triathlon is excited to return to Tempe, Arizona for the Collegiate Club and High School National Championships in 2019. USA Triathlon was last in Tempe for Collegiate Nationals in 2013 and 2014. High School Nationals (non-drafting) and the Collegiate Club Draft-Legal Championships will occur on Friday, April 5. The Collegiate Olympic-Distance and Mixed-Team Relay races will occur on Saturday, April 6. Collegiate Club and High School Nationals will also take place in Tempe in 2020.

 

Event details and registration here

USAT Age Group Nationals

Cleveland, Ohio

 

USA Triathlon is heading back to Cleveland, Ohio, the “Rock ‘n Roll Capital of the World!” The Olympic-Distance Age Group National Championship will take place on Saturday, Aug. 10 while the Sprint National Championship will occur on Sunday, Aug. 11. Athletes will swim in Lake Erie and bike and run along the lake shore overlooking downtown Cleveland. Participants of both races have the chance to compete for Age Group National Titles as well as spots on Team USA in 2020.

 

Event details and registration here

Lavaman Waikoloa Triathlon

Waikoloa Beach Resort, Hawaii

2019 Registration is Sold Out.

The 2019 Wait List is now closed – All slots from the wait list have been filled. Thank you for interest in the race. We hope to see you at the starting line for the 2020 race. Race date is April 5th, 2020 and registration will open up in May, 2019.

Aloha, The Lavaman Race Staff

 

Event details and registration here

Three Athletes Added to USA Paratriathlon Resident Team at U.S. Olympic Training Center

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced the roster for the 2019 USA Paratriathlon Resident Team, an elite squad based at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Melissa Stockwell (Chicago, Ill.), Kendall Gretsch (Downers Grove, Ill.) and Kyle Coon (Carbondale, Colo.) will join current resident team athletes Allysa Seely (Glendale, Ariz.), Howie Sanborn (Denver, Colo.) and Hailey Danz (Wauwatosa, Wis.) as they train for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games and other elite races on the International Triathlon Union circuit.

The resident team first opened its doors in April as the fifth Paralympic sport to call the Colorado Springs campus home. USA Triathlon Level I Certified Coach Derick Williamson (Colorado Springs, Colo.) is the program’s head coach.

Read the complete article here

Melissa Stockwell celebrates victory as a member of Team USA – Photo Credit: USA Triathlon – Joe Kusumoto

Tri coach Tuesday: How to Avoid a Stress Fracture

As athletes strive to improve themselves and their performances, they often push themselves to the point of injury.

The inherent cross training by multisport athletes can decrease the number of injuries, but unfortunately it does not eliminate them. Overuse bone injuries occur primarily during the running phase of training and racing and are more common with high running mileage and in individuals training for long course events.

Overuse injuries to bone encompasses a spectrum, from bone inflammation (stress reactions) to small fractures on one side of the bone (stress fractures), to breaks all the way through the bone. Stress fractures are a result of accumulative micro damage to bones from impact, which can lead to small or large breaks.

Bone is dynamic tissue with constant bony absorption and deposition stimulated by bone stress. Micro damage is a normal process that occurs with activity and is correlated with intensity and the amount of impact.

The body usually heals the micro damage before it can accumulate, and during the healing process, the body lays down extra bone to strengthen and prevent future injuries. This process is how athletes can improve their bone density. Unfortunately, there are times when athletes overwhelm their body’s ability to heal the bone stress and the damage accumulates to the point of localized inflammation or fracture.

The factors that are correlated with increased bony damage include: high running mileage, training errors, low bone density, high ridged arches, inappropriate foot wear, leg length discrepancies, and other malalignments. The most common of these factors that I see in the office are training errors, too much too soon, and inadequate recovery time, but all of them need to be considered.

image from realbuzz.com

The most common sites for stress fractures in runners are the shin (tibia) and foot bones (metatarsals and tarsals). Stress fractures typically present gradually but can also start with sudden pain.

Athletes sometimes are confused when a stress fracture presents acutely. Early inflammation and stress reactions can be pain free until the fracture occurs. Localized bony pain and tenderness is the hallmark of stress reactions and stress fractures. The area of pain is typically small and about the size of a half dollar. This localization is in contrast to shin splints, where the pain is over a much broader area such as the size of a dollar bill.

 

Complete USAT post here