Paralympians Allysa Seely, Mark Barr Win ESPYS

From USA Triathlon

Two of paratriathlon’s biggest stars were honored Wednesday night in Los Angeles at the ESPY Awards, ESPN’s annual celebration for all things sports.

Paralympians Allysa Seely and Mark Barr took home the ESPYS for best female and male athletes with a disability, honored for their dominant 2018 seasons.

Seely, who won gold at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, logged a perfect season in 2018 on the ITU Paratriathlon World Series circuit, culminating in a gold medal at the ITU Paratriathlon World Championships in Gold Coast, Australia, which marked her third career world title in the women’s PTS2 category. Seely’s season earned her USA Triathlon’s Elite Paratriathlete of the Year honors for 2018.

She has continued that win streak this season with first-place finishes at the first three stops on the circuit in Milan, Italy; Yokohama, Japan and Montreal, Quebec.

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Nation’s Top Amateur Triathletes to Compete at Age Group Nationals in Cleveland Next Month

From USA Triathlon

2018 USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships Sprint Distance August 12, 2018 ©2018 Rich Cruse /.crusephoto.com

USA Triathlon’s largest and longest-running national championship event returns to Cleveland’s Edgewater Park next month, with the most accomplished amateur triathletes in the nation set to compete for national titles and world championship berths on Aug. 10-11 as part of the 2019 Toyota USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships.

Thousands of age-group triathletes from all 50 states and Washington, D.C. are expected to compete in the event, which first debuted in 1983 and was previously held in Cleveland in 1992 and 2018. Age Group Nationals is consistently one of the top-five largest triathlons in the United States and last year’s event was the second-largest Age Group Nationals in the event’s history with more than 5,400 participants. The largest field to date was in 2014, when 5,789 athletes registered to race in Milwaukee.

“Triathletes of all ages from across the country make the trek to Age Group Nationals each year to test their skills against an immensely talented and competitive field,” said Brian D’Amico, USA Triathlon’s Director of Events. “It is a great source of pride to welcome these triathletes back to this two-day event year after year, and as we host this field in Cleveland for a second consecutive year, we’re grateful to all our partners in the local community, including the Greater Cleveland Sports Commission, Cleveland Metroparks, and the City of Cleveland, who are helping us ensure every competitor has a memorable race experience.”

The races will start at 7 a.m. ET on Saturday, Aug. 10, with the Olympic-Distance National Championships, where athletes will race across a 1,500-meter swim, 40-kilometer bike and 10-kilometer run course. Action will then resume at 7 a.m. ET on Sunday, Aug. 11, with the Sprint National Championships, covering a 750m swim, 20k bike and 5k run. Both events will be centered at Edgewater Park, a 147-acre lakefront with 9,000 feet of shoreline.

National titles are on the line both days, as are coveted spots on USA Triathlon’s Team USA, comprised of the nation’s top amateur athletes who represent the U.S. at ITU Age Group World Championship events. The top 18 finishers in each age group of Olympic-Distance Nationals, after applying the age-up rule (rolling down to 30th place), will earn the right to represent Team USA at the 2020 ITU Standard-Distance Age Group World Championships in Edmonton, Alberta, set for Aug. 20-23, 2020.

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USA Triathlon teams with USA Swimming and US Masters Swimming

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced a three-way partnership with USA Swimming and U.S. Masters Swimming to host open water swim races as part of two USA Triathlon-owned events this year, the inaugural Legacy Triathlon and the Toyota USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships.

The alliance was forged as a way for the organizations to collectively grow the sports of swimming and triathlon. The open water swim competitions will introduce single-sport swimmers to the multisport community, while offering a valuable racing option for triathletes who wish to hone their open water skills.

USA Triathlon, USA Swimming and U.S. Masters Swimming share many of the same members, making the partnership a natural fit. Athletes are not required to be members of any of the three organizations in order to compete in the open water swim events.

“Since the launch of the Time to Tri growth initiative last year, USA Triathlon has operated under the philosophy that a rising tide lifts all ships,” said Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. “This partnership is a perfect example of working with two peer organizations who share our goals as well as our values. Triathletes across the country have found community and camaraderie through USA Swimming and U.S. Masters Swimming programs. At the same time, we believe there is an opportunity we haven’t fully realized to reach aspiring triathletes from the swimming community.” 

The organizations will also collaborate on marketing and promotional efforts, while encouraging participation across their respective membership bases.

“Swimming is a lifelong sport, and finding ways for our membership to experience it in new ways, develop new skills and have fun is definitely a winning proposition,” said Joel Shinofield, Managing Director of Sport Development at USA Swimming. “Partnering with like-minded organizations such as USA Triathlon and U.S. Masters to continue to engage the membership and to get more athletes in the water is important to our respective long-term successes.” 

“We’re excited for the opportunity to partner with USA Triathlon and USA Swimming on these events,” said Dawson Hughes, CEO of U.S. Masters Swimming. “Providing more opportunities for our members to participate in open water swimming, as either a fitness challenge or competitive endeavor, is a goal for all three of our organizations. We hope these initial events serve as a platform for further collaboration.”

The races are open to all skill levels, and each participant will receive a swim cap and event-specific t-shirt.

At both events, the open water swim will be held the day before triathlon racing begins. 

The Legacy Triathlon open water swim will take place July 19 at 6 p.m. PT off the coast of Alamitos Beach in Long Beach, California. Both 750-meter and 1,500-meter options are available, and registration is now open at thelegacytriathlon.com. The action continues July 20 with the Legacy Triathlon age-group sprint-distance race, followed that same day by the Toyota USA Paratriathlon National Championships.

The open water swim at the Toyota USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships is set for Aug. 9 at 11 a.m. ET in Cleveland’s Lake Erie. The distance is 750m, and registration is now open at usatriathlon.org/agnc2019. (The open water swim is not considered a national championship event.) Triathlon racing gets underway Aug. 10 with the USA Triathlon Age Group Olympic-Distance National Championships, followed by the Sprint National Championships on Aug. 11. 

At Age Group Nationals, a bundled discount is available to athletes who register for the open water swim in addition to the sprint- or Olympic-distance race the same weekend. Visit the Age Group Nationals and Legacy Triathlon event websites for complete pricing details.  

About USA Triathlon
USA Triathlon is proud to serve as the National Governing Body for triathlon, as well as duathlon, aquathlon, aquabike, winter triathlon, off-road triathlon and paratriathlon in the United States. Founded in 1982, USA Triathlon sanctions more than 4,300 events and connects with more than 400,000 members each year, making it the largest multisport organization in the world. In addition to its work at the grassroots level with athletes, coaches, and race directors — as well as the USA Triathlon Foundation — USA Triathlon provides leadership and support to elite athletes competing at international events, including International Triathlon Union (ITU) World Championships, Pan American Games and the Olympic and Paralympic Games. USA Triathlon is a proud member of the ITU and the United States Olympic Committee (USOC). 

About USA Swimming
As the National Governing Body for the sport of swimming in the United States, USA Swimming is a 400,000-member service organization that promotes the culture of swimming by creating opportunities for swimmers and coaches of all backgrounds to participate and advance in the sport through clubs, events and education. Our membership is comprised of swimmers from the age group level to the Olympic Team, as well as coaches and volunteers. USA Swimming is responsible for selecting and training teams for international competition including the Olympic Games and strives to serve the sport through its core objectives: Build the base, Promote the sport, Achieve competitive success. For more information, visit www.usaswimming.org.

About U.S. Masters Swimming
U.S. Masters Swimming encourages adults to enjoy the health, fitness, and social benefits of swimming by providing more than 2,000 adult swimming programs and events across the country, including open water and pool competitions. USMS’s nearly 65,000 members range from age 18 to 99 and include swimmers of all ability levels. USMS, a nonprofit, also trains and certifies coaches and provides online workouts, a bimonthly member magazine, monthly newsletters, and technique articles and videos at usms.org.

U.S. Olympian Joe Maloy to Lead USA Triathlon Collegiate Recruitment Program

From USA Triathlon

Maloy to lead talent transfer of single-sport NCAA runners and swimmers to elite triathlon

Photo: Nils Nilsen

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced that 2016 U.S. Olympian Joe Maloy has been hired as coordinator of the USA Triathlon Collegiate Recruitment Program (CRP), which identifies and recruits top-level NCAA runners and swimmers to elite triathlon. A member of the USA Triathlon High Performance staff, Maloy started on June 24 and will work remotely out of Southern California.

Maloy fills the role previously held by 2004 U.S. Olympian Barb Lindquist, who founded the CRP in 2009 and resigned as program manager last month. Lindquist remains a consultant for the USA Triathlon high performance staff.

“USA Triathlon is proud to bring another Olympian onto our staff — not only to build on the strong foundation of the CRP, but also to develop its future in new and innovative ways,” said John Farra, High Performance General Manager at USA Triathlon. “Joe’s background as a collegiate swimmer, ITU triathlete and Olympian lends him an authenticity that will be key to recruiting the right athletes to the CRP. I know Joe is ready to hit the ground running as we approach Tokyo 2020 and the next Olympic quadrennial.”

The CRP fast-tracks the talent transfer of single-sport collegiate runners and swimmers who have the potential to be elite triathletes. Through active recruitment, assessment, mentorship, support and a full-time coaching environment within an elite squad, USA Triathlon has increased the quality and quantity of the next generation of potential Olympic medalists.

“Collegiate athletes who’ve transitioned to triathlon have enjoyed success at the sport’s highest levels,” Maloy said. “Barb Lindquist recognized an opportunity to introduce these athletes to our sport when she started USA Triathlon’s Collegiate Recruitment Program, and I’m looking forward to building upon that work. This is not only a great opportunity to help USA Triathlon find podium contenders for the Paris 2024 and Los Angeles 2028 Olympic Games, but it’s also a chance to introduce hard-working women and men to both a sport and a community that will positively impact their lives for years to come. “

Read the full press release here

National Triathlon Week Approaching – June 24-30

From USA Triathlon

National Triathlon Week is a nationwide initiative to celebrate the sport of triathlon and all its constituency groups. It is taking place from June 24-30, 2019. This week is geared toward education, celebration and participation in the multisport lifestyle. A different theme will be featured each day, starting with a spotlight on each discipline of triathlon: swim, bike and run. Don’t be fooled — National Triathlon Week is a celebration of not only triathletes, but all members of the multisport community, including officials, coaches, race directors, families and friends of triathletes and more.

There are many ways to get involved in National Triathlon Week! Whether you have 5 minutes or a full day, you’ll find a way to join the celebration. Check out the Get Involved page for ideas on how to share your excitement for the sport of triathlon, and be sure to use the hashtag #TriWeek on social media. This is your chance to share your story and compete against friends and triathletes across the country for daily prizes.

New to triathlon? Visit mytimetotri.com to get started today! Triathlon is an amazing sport, and we want to share it with you.

We’re going to raise the roof during National Triathlon Week, and we want to celebrate with everyone! We look forward to hearing your best stories and advice, seeing your favorite photos and sharing the multisport lifestyle all week long!

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Tri Coach Tuesday – I Will Be Fearless Today

From USA Triathlon
By Courtney Culligan

“Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from indomitable will.” -Mahatma Gandhi

Triathlon can be an intimidating sport. The idea of training for and completing three sport disciplines for one race can feel overwhelming for many people. Even the most experienced triathletes can let their worries get in the way of optimum performance. With proper training, support and mental preparation, those worries can fade away as you swim, bike and run your way to that finish line. It’s an amazing experience and one of great accomplishment. For athletes new to the sport or ones considering doing a triathlon for the first time, the importance of mental training is often overshadowed by the emphasis put on physical training in swimming, cycling and running. But, the physical and the mental must work together for the best outcome.

USA Triathlon Ambassador – Courtney Culligan

As an ambassador for USA Triathlon, when I go out into the community to encourage athletes to try a triathlon, I often hear these doubts: “I’m not athletic enough. I don’t think I can do that.”, “I am not a good swimmer. I’m too scared to try this.”, “I don’t have the right gear. My bike is too old.” But, guess what? As an athlete myself and a coach, I hear the experienced triathletes express worries as well. Every single triathlete in the world has had doubts about what he or she can accomplish. I completely understand this feeling. Testing ourselves in new ways is scary. Fear of failure is real. I said a lot of these same things to myself right before my first triathlon, “What the heck am I doing?? I can’t do this.” But, unless we take that first step towards a new challenge we can never know how that accomplishment feels. As athletes, we train our bodies to be strong but we often underestimate the need to train our minds to be resilient and think positively. We need to teach ourselves to believe in our strengths and follow that road to success.

Read the full article here

Podium Sweep in Yokohama Highlights Great Weekend for USA Triathlon

From USA Triathlon
By Nick Hehemann

Photo: Tommy Zaferes, ITU Media

ITU World Triathlon Series Yokohama

Three Americans on the podium and a third straight World Triathlon Series (WTS) victory for Katie Zaferes (Santa Cruz, Calif.) made it an incredible weekend for the USA Triathlon women in Yokohama. Summer Rappaport (Thornton, Colo.) earned silver for the second WTS medal of her career, while Taylor Spivey (Redondo Beach, Calif.) continued her impressive 2019 season with a bronze medal to help the red, white and blue round out the podium. It was the fourth U.S. podium sweep in ITU World Triathlon Series history and the first since 2016.

With a perfect start to 2019 — securing wins in Abu Dhabi, Bermuda and Yokohama — Zaferes has a commanding lead in the WTS Standings with 3,000 points. Spivey is tied with Great Britain’s Jessica Learmouth for second with 2,458 points. Rappaport is now in seventh after her podium finish.

Tamara Gorman (Rapid City, S.D.) was the fourth American to crack the top 10 in the women’s field, finishing ninth overall.

Morgan Pearson (Boulder, Colo.) was the top U.S. finisher on the men’s side, placing 15th overall. France’s Vincent Luis broke the tape.

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USA Cycling and USA Triathlon Join Forces

Exciting news from Colorado Springs, triathlete cyclists can rejoice in the partnership between USA Cycling and Triathlon!

From USA Cycling

USA CYCLING AND USA TRIATHLON ANNOUNCE NEW PARTNERSHIP

The Partnership will serve to collectively grow the sports of Cycling and Triathlon in the U.S.

Colorado Springs, Colo. – USA Cycling and USA Triathlon have announced a new partnership, offering joint programs and promotions to better serve existing members while attracting new participants to both sports. The U.S. Olympic National Governing Bodies are both headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado — allowing for frequent collaboration around the shared goal of growing the endurance sports community.

The first-of-its-kind partnership is highlighted by a joint annual membership option that provides access to all USA Triathlon- and USA Cycling-sanctioned events. The organizations will cross-promote their respective National Championships and select sanctioned races to each other’s members in an effort to expand racing opportunities for both groups.

The joint membership is now available for purchase for $99, a $31 savings versus purchasing the two memberships separately. More details and a registration link can be found at usacycling.org and usatriathlon.org.

In addition, USA Triathlon and USA Cycling will work together on promotional and educational programs benefitting athletes who compete in both sports. Landing pages will be created on usacycling.org and usatriathlon.org offering content specific to cyclists who want to become triathletes, and vice versa.

“As we see our members expand their interests and look for new challenges, the partnership with USA Triathlon is a great way to further service our members who are looking to build additional strength, endurance and spark their training,” said Rob DeMartini, USA Cycling CEO. “Triathletes will benefit from the partnership by having access to cycling coaches and bike-handling skills clinics to help them through the longest leg. As draft-legal triathlons become more popular among age-group athletes, learning to ride safely in a crowded field of athletes will become increasingly important.”

“Most triathletes in the U.S. come to us from a single-sport background such as swimming, cycling or running. Triathlon provides a unique challenge, a change of pace while cross-training and the opportunity to learn new skills — all of which can complement a single-sport focus,” said Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. “USA Cycling is an ideal partner in this initiative, as triathletes can also significantly improve their fitness and technical skills with cycling-specific training and racing. We are proud to align with a fellow U.S. National Governing Body to grow both sports while providing valuable perks to our members.”

For more information:

The joint membership option at $99 is now available for purchase here: https://endurancecui.active.com/event-reg/select-race?e=62166551

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Barry Siff Resigns as USA Triathlon Board of Directors President


Barry Siff talking to folks at Colorado Multisport about The Peak Triathlon in 2017

editors note: Barry Siff, for those newer to triathlon or Colorado, has had a major impact on the sport of triathlon. For years he headed 5430 which produced iconic races such as the Boulder Peak (now owned and run by Without Limits, Info here)

We at 303Endurance Network wish him the best in his future endeavors and thank him for his contribution to our sport and his kindness throughout the years.

Email

PrintAPRIL 15, 2019, 11:59 A.M. (ET)

USA Triathlon today announced that Barry Siff has resigned as President of the USA Triathlon Board of Directors, effective immediately, in order to accept the role of Chief Executive Officer for USA Team Handball. It is a full-time, paid staff position for the National Governing Body in the U.S. Olympic Movement. 

Jacqueline McCook, Vice President of the Board of Directors, has accepted the role of interim President. 

Siff joined the USA Triathlon Board of Directors in 2012, and was elected President in 2014. A former race director, he was integral in identifying and advancing USA Triathlon’s key organizational priorities, including development of the current 2020 Quad Strategic Plan. Siff also led the hiring process for Rocky Harris, who was named USA Triathlon’s CEO in August of 2017. 

“I have been a triathlete since 1986, and it has been an incredible honor and privilege to help lead USA Triathlon as its Board of Directors President for the past five years,” said Siff. “The current team at USA Triathlon is truly world-class, and I leave knowing that we have laid an incredibly strong foundation to achieve its mission of growing, inspiring and supporting the triathlon community.”

A champion for gender diversity within USA Triathlon governance, he helped to exponentially increase female representation on the Board of Directors. Siff also added an integral perspective to the Board as a former event organizer, and was a strong voice for all race directors while pushing the organization to better serve this key constituency group. 

As a member of the Executive Boards of the International Triathlon Union (ITU) and the American Triathlon Confederation (CAMTRI), Siff has served on several committees guiding the global direction of the sport over the last two years. His roles with the ITU and CAMTRI remain unchanged moving forward. Similarly, Siff was USA Triathlon’s top international ambassador, and directly supported triathlon development programs in Africa and Panama.

Siff was also a driving force for USA Triathlon’s ambitious efforts to grow participation and expand awareness for the sport — highlighted by the launch of the unprecedented Time to Tri initiative in partnership with IRONMAN, as well as the Legacy Triathlon, a new event leading up to the LA 2028 Olympic and Paralympic Games and set to debut this July in Long Beach, California.

Siff, who currently serves as Chair of a newly formed group comprised of Board Chairs from U.S. Olympic National Governing Bodies, has been an integral part of the multisport scene since 1986 as an athlete, coach, race director, writer and executive leader. He first became involved with USA Triathlon in a volunteer leadership role in 2009 as Chair of the Race Director Committee. 

“Barry Siff has made an indelible impact, both in the U.S. and internationally, during a span of nearly 30 years in multisport,” said Harris. “USA Triathlon has been incredibly fortunate to have such a passionate and dedicated leader at the helm of its Board of Directors, as well as his innumerable roles over the years. We are grateful for his service and passion, and we know that he will remain an integral part of the triathlon landscape for the foreseeable future.”

“Under Barry’s leadership, USA Triathlon has focused on better serving each of its constituent groups, as well as creating meaningful programs and initiatives to grow the sport, and investing resources strategically to ensure long-term, sustainable success,” said McCook. “Barry has always brought his unbridled enthusiasm, dedication and passion for the sport to his role as Board President, and for that we are extremely grateful. I look forward to working with the Board, Rocky and his team, to continue our work to grow, inspire and support our amazing triathlon community as I step into the role of interim President.”

McCook has served on the USA Triathlon Board as an Independent Director since 2013. She was elected the first-ever President of the Board of Directors for the USA Triathlon Foundation in 2014, and served in that role until 2018. McCook brings significant consumer-facing strategic, marketing and operational experience to the Board. She has served in senior executive positions in the consumer foods, retail and restaurant industries, including with PepsiCo, YUM! Brands, Diageo and ConAgra Foods. 

Her professional career also includes the consulting firm, McKinsey & Company; the national retailer, Target; and the investment-banking firm, Morgan Stanley. McCook received her Bachelor of Arts in international relations from Stanford University, and her Master of Business Administration with honors from the Harvard Business School. She completed her first triathlon in the early 1990s, and was a founding member of the Stanford Women’s Water Polo Team.  

Women’s Wednesday: My Daughter has Angelman Syndrome. She’s The Reason Why I Race

From USA Triathlon
By Deanna McCurdy

I signed up for my first triathlon nine years ago. My 16-month-old daughter, Hayden, had just been diagnosed with Angelman Syndrome (AS), a rare genetic disorder that affects one in every 15,000 births. As Hayden pushed herself every day to learn how to stand, to walk, to communicate using assistive devices (she is nonverbal), and even eat, I challenged myself with learning the sport of triathlon. I wanted to use the sport to help raise money and awareness for her condition.

I soon discovered that triathlon became a metaphor for our life. I wasn’t a natural swimmer, so learning proper swim techniques was a challenge for me. Swimming in a race was new territory to navigate, similar to the special-needs world I had been thrown into. Just when I thought I had figured out the swim, a wave would splash me in the face or I would get kicked by another swimmer fighting for space in the water.

Here’s the thing I’ve discovered with swimming: No matter how hard you get pummeled, you have to keep moving your arms and legs or you will sink to the bottom, just like in life. Many days I want to throw in the towel, but I have a child who needs me to not only care for her, but be her voice, to fight for her and help her reach her full potential—so I have to keep moving forward.

I’ve always loved the outdoors. I grew up riding bikes with friends around the small Georgia town where I grew up. I learned how to mountain bike while dating my husband, who has become my training partner and biggest cheerleader on this journey. Little did I know that something I did for fun on the weekends before having a family would help pave the way for not only mental therapy sessions in the woods, but also success in the sport of triathlon.

Learning how to race on a bike was work, but it was such rewarding work, just like overcoming daily challenges and not giving in until they are figured out. Grinding away over steep, rocky terrain with burning lungs and straining legs is incredibly hard, but unbelievably rewarding once you reach the top of a mountain and look back on where you came from to get to where you are now.

Read the full article here
https://www.teamusa.org/USA-Triathlon/News/Blogs/My-Story/2019/March/25/Deanna-McCurdy-My-Daughter-has-Angelman-Syndrome-Shes-The-Reason-Why-I-Race