Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Mancos named among the Top 10 Towns for High-Altitude Running

With just over 104,000 square miles of beauty, 53 peaks above 14,000 ft, and an overall average elevation of 6,800 ft it is no surprise three Colorado towns popped up on Outside Magazine’s top 10 towns for high-altitude running list.

The Top 10 Towns for High-Altitude Running

From Outside Magazine
By Stephen Wayne Kasica

Photo: Getty Images/Stockphoto/Varsescu

Hello, red blood cells!

Want to breathe with unconstrained lungs, cruise over hills as if they were pesky speed bumps, and shave down your PR? Then you’ll need to spend some time huffing and puffing in thin mountain air. Although there’s no conclusive sweet spot for optimal elevation training, USA Track & Field has recommended that athletes live between 7,000 and 8,000 feet above sea level. Sparse oxygen at such altitude forces your body to increase its number of red blood cells, thus increasing the amount of oxygen delivered to muscles during exercise and improving performance.

Lately, some of the best runners in the country have been traveling abroad for their stints at altitude. Nick Symmonds said he trained for a month at around 6,000 feet in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, leading up to the 2014 indoor track national championships. Ryan Hall and his wife, Sara, flew to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to run at 7,000 feet in preparation for this year’s Boston Marathon. Desi Linden trained in Iten, Kenya (elevation 7,900), for the same race.

But there are plenty of high altitude destinations stateside. Flatlanders ought to be cautious when traveling any of these places—and not just because of the lack of oxygen. Visitors often become residents. Marathoner Frank Shorter moved to Boulder, Colorado, in 1970 to prepare for the 1972 Munich Olympics, and Boulderites still see him on area trails.

Read the full article here

Running Through the Fear

From Outside Magazine
By Katie Arnold

In the wake of a bizarre physical attack and the death of her father, Katie Arnold felt paralyzed by the anxieties of parenthood and being a woman alone in the wilderness. She got through it the same way she’d always done, by lacing up and hitting the trail. An exclusive excerpt from her new memoir, Running Home.

There’s one question that people always ask me about running alone in the backcountry. It’s the same question they ask me about taking young children down whitewater rivers. I know because it’s also the one I ask myself. Aren’t you scared?

The answer is: absolutely. In the seven years I’ve been an ultrarunner, I’ve taught myself to tolerate uncertainty, to be comfortable being uncomfortable. I’ve run and won races ranging from 50 kilometers to 100 miles, but I still rarely leave the house without weighing my worries against my desire to run, assessing the risks of being on my own in the wilderness, thinking hard about what’s at stake. Everything.

I’m scared of getting lost and of getting hurt and of being attacked by animals wild and domesticated—even livestock. Dogs that lunge at me from yards; cattle that graze in meadows, staring at me with their mean, blank eyes when I sidle by, daring me to pass. They’re just cows, I chide myself, feeling foolish, but they are large and lumbering and ten times my weight, and they could mow me down in an instant.

I don’t worry about lone coyotes—at 40 pounds, they’re too small and skittish to do any harm—but packs of coyotes, though rarely encountered, are unpredictable. (In 2009, a female solo hiker was killed by a pair of coyotes in Nova Scotia.) Rattlesnakes are uncommon in my hometown of Santa Fe. They don’t do well above 7,000 feet, or so I thought, until the day I came upon a pair of mating rattlers in the middle of a trail. I was nearly on top of them before I realized the coiled brown rope at my feet wasn’t a rope at all, but a knot of amorous vipers, and I yelped and hurdled over them. Now I keep my eyes down.

Read the full article here

Is running outside in all the wildfire smoke bad for you?

From 9News
By Allison Sylte

Smoke from wildfires in California and Canada is making the air tremendously hazy in Denver. Here’s what you should know if you still want to run outside.

KUSA — The best thing about running is that, unlike other things in life such as eating an entire cake, you never regret doing it once you’re finished.

But, with smoke from the wildfires out west blocking out both the sun and Colorado’s mountain views, it’s fair to wonder if it might be time to opt for an indoor workout.

The good news? Unless you have preexisting breathing problems, you likely won’t do lasting damage by getting in your run outside. That’s according to Dr. Anthony Gerber, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health.

RELATED | Thick smoke clouds the air across the Front Range Monday

“It’s pretty unlikely that a young, otherwise healthy person is going to have damage from breathing [wildfire smoke],” Gerber said.

Read the full article

Weekend Preview

Triathlon Events

Saturday August 11th

 

BAM Open Water Swim

Boulder


Sunday August 12th

 

Steamboat Triathlon – SOLD OUT

Steamboat Springs


Leadville 10k

Leadville



Cycling Events

Thursday August 9th

 

BVV Thursday Night Track

Erie


Breck Epic MTB Stage Race – Day 5

Breckenridge


Friday August 9th

 

Breck Epic MTB Stage Race – Day 6

Breckenridge


Saturday August 10th

 

Pikes Peak HC & Gran Fondo

Colorado Springs


Stonewall Century Ride

Le Veta


The Mountains Revenge

Montezuma


Leadville 100 MTB Race

Leadville


Steamboat Stinger MTB Race

Steamboat Springs


Bike MS: Bighorn Country Classic

Sheridan, WY


8th Annual B Strong Ride

Boulder


Scott Enduro Cup Series: Durango

Durango


Trek Travel at Campus Cycles

Denver


Breck Epic MTB Stage Race – Day 7

Breckenridge


Powderhorn 100k – Cancelled

Mesa


Sunday August 12th

 

Darkblade systems Thunderbird Road Race

Colorado Springs


Bike MS: Bighorn Country Classic

Sheridan, WY


Scott Enduro Cup Series: Durango

Durango

Mark Plaatjes Is Getting Back in the Shoe Business

Co-founder of Boulder Running Company is getting back in the shoe game with new store

The man behind making the Boulder Running Company a popular player on the Front Range running scene is getting back into the shoe game after a four-year absence.

Photo by Marty Caivano/June 10, 2011

Mark Plaatjes, a physical therapist and former world champion in the marathon who co-founded BRC with Johnny Halberstadt in 1995, has confirmed rumors that he will open a new running store in Boulder this summer. It will be called In Motion Running.

Plaatjes’ PT practice is called In Motion Rehabilitation.

Plaatjes and Halberstadt sold the BRC stores to the Gart Companies in 2013. Plaatjes remained with BRC as an employee for a year after the sale but left the company in 2014. BRC was sold again last year.

Plaatjes this week said he misses selling shoes and the culture of running specialty stores.

“It was part of my life for 18 years,” Plaatjes said in his PT clinic Thursday. “I love the balance between physical therapy and the store. It’s totally different interactions. I miss helping people in a different way than I do here. And it was just a wonderful  way for me to be in touch with the whole running community. I miss it a lot.”

Plaatjes, a naturalized American from South Africa, won a gold medal in the marathon at the 1993 world championships. His PT clinic is on the second floor above the original BRC store on Pearl Street in Boulder. His new store will be located in Boulder at 30th and Walnut, and his PT practice will relocate there when the store opens. The target date for opening is Aug. 1.

Read the full article here.

Blind runners form a tight community

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Blind runner Amelia Dickerson, right, gets congratulated by her friend and guide Grace Dill, left, after finishing the 5 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

From the Denver Post

By Danika Worthington

About 15 participants enjoy the social nature of race

Members of the tight-knit group pumped up one another at the starting line.

Shoes were retied last minute as the national anthem played from the speakers. When it finished, the announcer asked blind and visually impaired runners to come forward.

The group made their way up. Crosby, a guide dog for runner Kerry Kuck, stood at the front of the pack. The runners prepared for their starting cue, which was a minute before the rest of the participants tackled the 5-mile route at the annual Cherry Creek Sneak.

“Crosby the dog is going to lead the way,” the announcer barked out to the crowd. Then, the start was signaled. The runners and their guides took off, breaking away down the first stretch.

The Colorado Springs based U.S. Association of Blind Athletes partnered with Achilles Denver, the local chapter of an international organization that gives athletes with disabilities a community of support, and Lending Sight, a Colorado sports club that connects those with good vision with blind or visually impaired runners, to recruit about 15 runners and guides to race Sunday.

For some, the sport is about escaping isolation or exploring freedom. For others, it is a fun form of exercise. Regardless of the motivation, the athletes all expressed a similar theme: Blind runners have a tight community in Denver.

Read the full story

From Montana and India, they became friends and training partners in Denver; Sunday they went 1-2 in Cherry Creek Sneak 10-miler

From The Denver Post

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Kailas Kokare, left, and Jordan Jones, second from right, congratulate their friend and competitor Seth Garbett, second from left, after Garbett won the 10 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. Kokare came in second and Jones came in 4th. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

A pair of unlikely training partners — one from a small town in Montana, the other from a village in India — took the first two places Sunday in the Cherry Creek Sneak 10-miler. How Seth Garbett and Kailas Kokare became friends and roommates is an even more improbable story.

Garbett, who won Sunday in 51 minutes, 55 seconds, ran for Montana State after growing up in Darby, a town of 500 near the Montana-Idaho border by the Continental Divide. Kokare, who was second in 54:14, grew up poor in the hills near Mumbai and lost his right hand when he was a year old after placing it in a fire while his mother was distracted.

They met last summer through a mutual friend. When Kokare needed a place to stay, Garbett and his wife invited him to move in with them.

Read the full article

First Sub-4-minute Miler Roger Bannister Dies

From Bleacher Report

Sir Roger Bannister, the first person to run a mile in under four minutes, has died aged 88.

As BBC Sport relayed, the Bannister family released a statement confirming the news on Sunday morning.

In it, they noted the legendary runner “died peacefully” and “surrounded by his family who were as loved by him as he was loved by them.”

Bannister etched his name into athletics history on May 6, 1954, when he completed the mile distance in a time of three minutes, 59.4 seconds in Oxford, England.

Read the full article

Tyler Butterfield tackling Bermuda Marathon this weekend

From the Royal Gazette

Triathlete Tyler Butterfield will run in Bermuda Marathon Weekend as he continues his preparation for the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia, in April.

Butterfield is to return home from Boulder, Colorado, tomorrow and will be among hundreds taking part in the full marathon on Sunday — the final race of the three-day event.

The 34-year-old, whose schedule does not usually allow him to compete in the Bermuda Marathon Weekend, will also take part in the Butterfield & Vallis 5K next weekend, which marks the 100th anniversary of his family’s wholesale business.

“I’m super excited about doing a road race in Bermuda again,” Butterfield said.

“I miss doing May 24, but some years the timing works and others it doesn’t due to other races over here in the United States or internationally.

“I’m pumped to get to do a bit of Bermuda Marathon Weekend, a weekend I used to always look forward to when I lived on the island. I’m not looking at anything special from myself in the marathon; I just want to enjoy it.

“I will be racing off mostly base training and it will be one of my last long, harder runs before I switch to focus on more speed.”

Butterfield left his mark in the schools’ KPMG Front Street Mile races in the early 2000s when he set several records. His schedule will not allow him to return in time to watch those races.

“I would love to come on Thursday to watch the Front Street Mile on Friday night, but I’ve one other sponsor trip I had to do this week, today and tomorrow.”

Butterfield is also looking forward to competing in the Butterfield & Vallis race, along with brother Spencer. He will also be the guest speaker at the Bermuda Triathlon Association’s prize-giving dinner at the Loft at Flanagan’s next Saturday.

“Tickets for that are available at Raceday World, and it should be a fun night talking about modern racing, the old days of triathlon and racing with my dad Jim.

“Then the next day I will be at the Butterfield & Vallis 5k to celebrate the [company’s] 100th anniversary. It’s a perfect distance for everyone to come out and enjoy a family event.

“It’s great to be able to be home for both weekends and three great events. Bermuda always has so much going on.”

Butterfield will then turn his focus to the Commonwealth Games, where he hopes to be a part of a triathlon relay team including Flora Duffy, Tyler Smith and Erica Hawley.

“After this trip to Bermuda, it will be back to Colorado and a training camp in Arizona to start to get ready for Commonwealth Games in April,” he said.

 

Read the full article

303Radio Interviews Stryd’s Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson

303radio was in Boulder recently interviewing Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson of Stryd–the running power meter and finding out why it should be under the Christmas tree this year.

If you aren’t familiar with running with a power meter you will want to listen to this podcast to learn why running with power can help you be faster and more efficient.

 

Also, be sure to check out our full story on Stryd by Rich Soares from our Holiday Gift Guide.