The Collins Cup, Even Super Bowl One Didn’t Sell Out, But it Was a Pretty Good Start–a Few Ideas for the Future

By Bill Plock

In 1966 Lamar Hunt unknowingly named the Super Bowl. The owner of the Kansas City Chiefs in the American Football League led a movement to compete with the National Football League. The champions of each league would play each other in a championship game in 1967 leading to a future merger of the leagues. Lamar Hunt wrote NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle a letter in July of 1966, “I have kiddingly called it the ‘Super Bowl,’ which obviously can be improved upon.” He later said the named popped into his head watching his kids play with a super ball. That super ball, along with Lamar Hunt are the in the Football Hall of Fame and we all know “Super Bowl” stuck and it’s one of the most watched events on the planet. But that first game didn’t even sell out, it takes time.

Triathlon’s “Super Bowl” happened today in Slovakia, it was called the Collins Cup. Yes we have Kona and the IRONMAN World Championships but that is about individuals, today was about the teams and the sport and profession of triathlon.

The Collins Cup was designed to mirror golf’s popular Ryder Cup pitting three teams of 12 athletes (6 men, 6 women) against each other. One team from Europe, the United States and Internationals. 

The goal, to make professional triathlon a better spectator sport thus attracting more money to make the profession more lucrative and sustainable. 

Will it work? Did it work? It’s too early to say but nobody predicted the wild popularity of the Super Bowl. Triathlon will never be that popular but lets see what happens. 

The Professional Triathlon Organisation orchestrated this “made for TV event”. Viewers watched 12 matches with one competitor from each team racing. Each match started 10 minutes apart. The entire race lasted about 5 hours. Cameras were all over the course capturing the 36 athletes racing in their own three person race. It was fun to watch and the coverage was good as was the announcing. It was especially fun to have Tour de France commentator Phil Liggett behind the mic. His voice just adds a tone of familiarity and importance. 

Team Europe won, followed by the United States and the the Internationals. No surprise there. 

By far the story of the day was U.S’s Taylor Knibb, again. She absolutely crushed her competition and notably IRONMAN World Champion and number one ranked Daniela Ryf. Taylor beat her by almost 17 minutes. By far the largest gap of any match of the day. Her final time of 3:30 was the best time by almost four minutes over any women and only three minutes behind IRONMAN male World Champion Patrick Lange! And Taylor did it on a road bike!

Said 303 Podcast Director, Rich Soares, “Having the best triathletes in the world racing for teams makes for great competition.  Having the fantasy competition really added to the engagement and the eventual upsets and surprises.  I Loved seeing the Olympians race against long course champions.  My big question, where was Olympic gold medalist Flora Duffy?  Knibb vs. Duffy right now would be Pay-Per-View worthy!”

But let’s break down the event. It’s a good start if you like triathlon, know some of these athletes and understand what they are trying to do. A better start if you have raced long course to appreciate the speed. And a fabulous start if you know anything about the Ryder cup and how match play works. But even if you don’t know the Ryder cup, the announcers did a good job of explaining what was going on and how the points were earned. Where beating competitors by more minutes meant more team points. That alone kept every race important and each athlete motivated to stay close. The motivation of working for the team was very real. We heard Jan Frodeno say how hard it was when he was told with 2k to go that if he could increase his lead by 30 seconds it would mean an extra point for his team. And he did just that—busted a move and exhausted himself even with a comfortable lead over Sam Appleton. 

The points were key to making the races compelling. Otherwise there were almost no close finishes and little shoulder to shoulder running and drama at the finish line. I think that needs to change somehow. Having 12 matches and virtually no finish line drama was a bit of a miss. 

The television coverage was good with plenty of coverage all over the course. And the interactive “maps” showing arial views of where the athletes were, sort of like Harry Potter’s Maurader map, was cool. I would’ve like to see a huge arial map showing where all athletes were on the course with “flags” showing speed/pace. 

One thing that was severely lacking, and would’ve added a lot of energy were spectators. Even more riding through towns with fans, but there were barely any. And the finish line was small and not very electric. That was disappointing. 

Rich Soares adds, “The Olympics is a hard act to follow.  After weeks of Olympic village and Odaiba Park with it’s massive blue carpet area, I was a little underwhelmed by the Collins Cup venue.  Great camera angles and on course coverage no doubt.  Being right after the Olympics in the middle of a pandemic might be limiting, but I would love to see this in a bigger city with crowds next time.”

I thought they (PTO) might steal some ideas from NASCAR and feature more data like heart rates and watts and give more stats like min/mile, mph and other effort indications. I think more of that data would be appealing to non-triathlete watchers who get speed and data. I’m sure getting athletes to agree to reveal that data might be hard. 

In general I liked format and match ups. I felt the racing was a bit lonely with not enough dueling on the course. Maybe matches should be with 6 or even 9 athletes so teams can work a bit together on the course with more potential for drama at the finish line. 

But I also have a Super Bowl ticket stub when a ticket cost $30 and my dad thought that was crazy. $30 might get you a parking spot a mile from the stadium these days. You gotta start somewhere! 

By the way the fantasy aspect Rich talked about; fans and media could predict the outcomes and fans could win prizes. I took a few chances hoping for some upsets but finished in the middle of the pack of the Team US media. The European Press mimicked the European athletes and kicked ass!

The final standings:

INDIVIDUAL MATCH RESULTS

Match 1 
Taylor Knibb USA 3:30:11 – 6 points
Daniela Ryf EUR +16:43 – 3.5 points
Teresa Adam INT +22:58 – 1 point 

Match 2 
Lucy Charles-Barclay EUR 3:33:46 – 5 points
Katie Zaferes USA +4:16 – 2 points
Paula Findlay INT +4:53 – 1 point 

Match 3
Jackie Hering USA 3:35:19 – 4 points
Anne Haug EUR +2:23 – 2 points
Jeanni Metzler INT +3:24 – 1 point

Match 4
Ellie Salthouse INT 3:38:36 – 4.5 points
Skye Moench USA +2:01 – 2.5 points
Holly Lawrence EUR +5:29 – 1 point  

Match 5 
Emma Pallant-Browne EUR 3:34:45 – 4.5 points
Chelsea Sodaro USA +1:13 – 3.5 points
Sarah Crowley INT +8:27 – 1 point  

Match 6
Katrina Matthews EUR 3:35:12 – 5.5 points
Jocelyn McCauley USA +5:42 – 3 points
Carrie Lester INT +10:42 – 1 point 

Match 7
Jan Frodeno EUR 3:20:22 – 5 points
Sam Appleton INT +4:38 – 2 points
Sam Long USA +5:09 – 1 point 

Match 8
Gustav Iden EUR 3:13:28 – 6 points
Collin Chartier USA +7:13 – 2 points 
Kyle Smith INT + 7:16 – 1 point

Match 9
Lionel Sanders INT 3:19:13 – 3 points
Sebastian Kienle EUR +1:06 – 2 points 
Andrew Starykowicz USA +1:51 – 1 point  

Match 10
Daniel Baekkegard EUR 3:15:27 – 4.5 points
Ben Kanute USA +1:23 – 3.5 points
Max Neumann INT +10:58 – 1 point  

Match 11
Braden Currie INT 3:27:13 – 5.5 points
Matt Hanson USA +5:16 – 2 points  
Patrick Lange EUR +6:44 – 1 point 

Match 12
Jackson Laundry INT 3:18:28 – 3.5 points
Joe Skipper EUR +00:38 – 2.5 points
Justin Metzler USA +3:45 – 1 point

TEAM STANDINGS

Team Europe – 42.5 points
Team US – 31.5 points
Team Internationals – 25.5 points

Heather Gollnick on the 303Endurance Podcast

Check out our most recent podcast with 5x Ironman champ and Spartan Pro team member Heather Gollnick.  She’s the head coach at Liberty University and she and her husband have their own coaching business IronEdge Coaching.  

Listen to the podcast here: https://303endurance.libsyn.com/heather-gollnick-pro-and-coach or you can find it on your favorite podcast sharing platform.

Here are the show notes:

Thanks to last week’s guest, Erin Carson of Rally Sport and ECFIT. Here is a link to that great interview: https://303endurance.libsyn.com/erin-carson-rally-sports

In Today’s Show:

  • Interview with Heather Gollnick
  • Endurance News – Ironman Return To Racing Steps
  • What’s New in the 303 – What’s the status with local races, Colorado Classic and more.

Sponsor UCAN:

Bill, did you get your UCAN Starter Pack yet?  I’ve been going through it myself.  Really loving drinking a bottle prior to a long run and then just carrying the hydration formula with extra salts.

UCAN gives you steady energy so you can finish stronger. UCAN Performance Energy and Bars are powered by SuperStarch®.  Use in your training to fuel the healthy way and recover quickly! Use code MHE2020 for 15% off at generationucan.com, or try the UCAN Tri Starter Pack – 50% off, limit 1 – https://www.generationucan.com/product/ucan-tri-starter-pack-50-off/   

Interview with Heather Gollnick:

Heather Gollnick was at the top of her triathlon career about the time I was discovering triathlon.  She raced a ton as a pro triathlete and races a ton more as a OCR Spartan pro.  As you’ll hear she loves to train as well.  As we mentioned in the intro that she is head triathlon coach at Liberty University and co-owner of IronEdge Coaching.  Let’s chat with Heather Gollnick.

Post interview discussion.

  • I do remember seeing video of Heather doing a cartwheel
  • We didn’t get into it but I read an interview with Heather where she talks about her daughter [Jordon], born with cerebral palsy, and was told by doctors that she would would never walk. She walks with a cane now.  I also read that in her first Ironman in Madison WI she didn’t think she could even start the run.  She saw Jordon and it hit her that Jordon would want that opportunity to run, so Heather ran for her daughter.  She said “I think of Jordan every time I’m in a race and I want to stop or slow down.”

Sponsor VENGA:

Thanks to Jay O’Hare at VENGA for the introduction to Heather.  We didn’t discuss VENGA as much as I was hoping to.  We’ve both been trying the Ultra Gels and the Recovery Balm.  There big thing is the Nano Emulsion Technology which makes it water soluble, getting up to 5x CBD in your Blood Stream.  It’s 100% THC-Free, Works Fast and the Ultra Gels make sure you get a Precise dose.  Great reducing inflammation and helping you get great sleep.

“Venga!” is a Spanish for “Come on! go!

Endurance News:

Ironman Lubbock 70.3 is on.  Check out the Athlete Guide as a template for future races.

IRONMAN Return To Racing https://www.facebook.com/IRONMANtri/

  • Health screening which includes questionnaire and touchless temperature check
  • physical distancing markers
  • Designated check-in times
  • Athlete briefings virtual
  • Reduced touchpoints (bikes per rack, recommended self support,
  • Swim start (pulsed, smaller waves, wider entrance points)
  • More space
  • Shade tents instead of change tents
  • Athletes rack their own bikes
  • Number and location of aid stations.  More emphasis on special needs bags.
  • Volunteers to restock instead of serve
  • More physical space at the finish line
  • Individual race choices

What’s New in the 303:

About Without Limits and Boulder Peak? https://www.withoutlimits.co/boulder-peak-triathlon-race-info

Eight U.S. Olympic and Paralympic triathlon hopefuls, along with USA Triathlon CEO Rocky Harris and one guide for a visually impaired athlete, who will be riding across the state of Colorado in a 24-hour relay on June 19-20 to raise funds for COVID-19 relief. The ride will cover 483 miles in total distance, gaining nearly 23,000 feet of elevation as it extends from the Utah-Colorado state line in Montrose, Colorado, to the Colorado-Kansas state line at U.S. 40 and CR 57 (near the town of Arapahoe, Colorado). The route travels from the Western Slope up into the Rocky Mountains, cresting Monarch Pass at 11,312 feet of elevation before descending into the Front Range via Colorado Springs and into the Eastern Plains.

A local news station in Colorado Springs put together this quick segment yesterday: https://www.kktv.com/content/sports/With-dream-deferred-Olympic-hopefuls-to-bike-across-Colorado-for-charity-571111931.html.

Boulder’s Dede Griesbauer and Kennett Peterson dominate the IRONMAN VR10 Pro Challenge Weekend

The 10th edition of the IRONMAN® VR™ Pro Challenge saw a United States sweep with Dede Griesbauer winning the women’s race and Kennett Peterson taking the top honors in the men’s race as eight top triathletes battled it out over the course of two days. Mixing up the format, athletes took on a 3 km run through the Eagle Trail in Boulder, Colorado before hopping on their trainers. From there, athletes began their 40 km bike ride in Gerry Boyle Park on a portion of the newly offered IRONMAN 70.3 Eagleman bike course, utilizing Official Virtual Cycling partner ROUVY’s augmented reality.

In the closely contested professional women’s race, Dede Griesbauer (USA) fought her way into the top spot with an impressive performance, finishing the 3 km run and 40 km bike in an overall time of 1:07:53, while Lindsey Jerdonek (USA) finished in second place with a combined time of 1:08:42. Danielle Mack (USA) took third position with a finishing time of 1:10:09 and Rachel Olson (USA) rounded out the group with a time of 1:11:19.

Colorado Classic Planning to Roll With “Made for TV” Model

Denver, CO (June 9, 2020) — In response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Colorado Classic® presented by VF Corporation today released an initial statement sharing their intention to continue their August race with a revised format, a ‘Made for TV Streaming’ model.

With a new race model that limits the gathering of crowds and prioritizes the safety of riders, host communities and staff, the race organizers feel optimistic that America’s premier all-women’s professional road cycling race could successfully continue August 27-30, 2020 — pending the appropriate approvals from the State, county and city health departments.

Video of the Week:

Venga CBD Review 2020 – THC-Free CBD For Ultrarunners/Endurance Athletes

Closing:

Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us on social media including @303endurance and @triathlon and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We’d really appreciate it!

Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

Friends DO Let Friends Race Draft-Legal Tri–What a Blast!!

By Rich Soares

A couple of months ago some friends encouraged me to try our first draft-legal triathlon. I’ve been doing non-draft triathlons for nearly 15 years, and thought it was time to try something new. “First” experiences at my age are rare!

Tom, Todd and Rich

This wasn’t just any draft-legal race, this was the Sun Devil USA Triathlon Draft National Championship for age-groupers and collegiate athletes. As a veteran of IRONMAN Arizona in Tempe, I was familiar with the area, except this transition area was on the opposite shore.

On my pre-race shakeout ride, I knew this was going to be a different experience. Packs of riders pre-riding the course passed me on my aluminum Cannondale (the same bike I did my first triathlon with) like I was standing still.

Khem Suthiwan and Rich

Later, in the practice swim, other swimmers passed me at rates leaving no doubt about the high competition level. This was Nationals after all!

On race morning, USAT officials screened every athlete for draft legal rule adherence before allowing entry. For instance, those with sleeved tops or aero bars were stopped. Officials encouraged a clean transition area by asking athletes to locate tri bags to a corner of the transition area, otherwise the transition was just like any other race, aside from the fact that the transition area was under a highway overpass.

As a beach start, the only thing that I noticed being different was the presence of a blue carpet spread across the beach, freshly swept to display numbered start positions which would be used by the NCAA teams later that day.

When the horn blew I felt like I was in a new, unfamiliar type of race. The best swimmers sprinted to the water and dove in with these graceful, arching dives that propelled them forward fast. Stroking and sighting in the 65 degree water, the remainder of the swim played out like any other open water swim.

Once on the bike, the differences of draft-legal racing quickly became apparent. The first pack passed me at dizzying speeds as I was still tightening my bike shoes. Just two minutes out of transition and I was by myself watching the pack speed away.

Before I processed what happened, someone else came upon me pulling half dozen riders behind him. I tried to jump on the last wheel, but within 30 seconds I fell off and enjoyed most of the first of three laps by myself.

On the second lap, I heard a new rider on my wheel. After clearing a couple of corners, he passed me. I jumped on his wheel and noted his Team USA kit with the name “Hefflefinger” on the backside. I soon realized there was another rider on my wheel.

After 30 seconds or so, Hefflefinger called me up for a pull. I was stoked to work with someone on this race! Here I am on the same aluminum road bike I rode in triathlons 14 years ago, riding in a draft-legal pack! I eagerly take the lead and am careful to not let adrenaline get the bettor of me. I don’t want to drop my new alliances!

We took turns pulling and near the Mill Avenue bridge, I heard a train of guys approaching from behind. As they passed, I made a knee jerk decision to go with them and jumped on the last wheel. As we turn the corner on College and over the hill, I maxed my effort trying to hold on to this new train of guys. We crested the hill, made the turn back over the hill and the caboose (that’s me) came off the back of the train.

Great – I’m starting the third lap the way I started the first – alone!

I abandoned Hefflefinger and the train left me to fend for myself. On the final crossing of the Mill Avenue bridge, I heard another group approach from behind. It was my new buddy Hefflefinger and a couple of other guys. Heff shouted, “jump on”! Relieved to be back with a group, I followed them for the last time and headed to transition.

I hit my lap button running out of T2 in :52 seconds. I saw a few Team USA kits ahead of me, but no Heff. I assessed how I felt about this pace while thinking about a nagging calf injury that kept me from running for a month. My only run; one mile at rest stop driving to this race from Denver!

I had no idea how this was going to go. I tried to catch an older guy in a Team USA kit, but can’t seem to close any distance. We ran through Tempe Town Lake park and onto the Ironman run course again with an out and back on the opposite side of the river from the finish line. I continued at a measured 5K pace until I hit the pedestrian bridge at just past two miles into the race. I increased the pace to the edge of what I think I can hold for the remaining half mile to the finish.

I heard foot steps behind me. I don’t want to get passed! I up the effort to squeeze whatever I have left to propel me to the finish!

I’m wiped! I almost throw up! THAT meant I probably raced beyond my fitness. This race tapped the adrenaline and allowed me to find a new level of effort.

I regrouped with my friends Tom and Todd to share our stories of the race, when Hefflefinger came by. We had a good chuckle about the race and working together. It took experiencing it to fully appreciated the magnitude of working with a group on a draft-legal race. The competition at the Nationals level is high in non-draft, but in draft-legal, it’s another level.

This is fast racing that is so stinking fun! The whole experience of being with friends and seeing familiar faces. I actually gave USAT President, Rocky Harris, a hug while still in my sweaty tri suit – sorry Rocky!

I had a decent race, placing 16th in my male 50-54 AG. I didn’t even come close to the top 10 to qualify for Team USA, but that’s not the point. I had an absolute blast and feel proud of the accomplishment and experience. I’m proud of getting outside of my comfort zone and trying something new for sure. But there’s more. I tapped into a rush of adrenaline yesterday that almost made vomit at the finish line! That’s cool!! Not the vomit part, but the tapping into that much human drive. I want more of it and I’ll be back for it next year!

Oktoberfest 2018: A Blast of a Season Closer

by Rich Soares

The Oktoberfest Triathlon has earned a reputation of being the “don’t miss the fun” race of the season.

 

Officially the last local triathlon race of the season, more than 700 athletes come from around the country to say goodbye to the summer triathlon race season by letting their fun flag fly! Oktoberfest featured sprint, relay team and collegiate division races including draft legal and non-draft races from twelve Universities.

 

Sunday’s race began with the draft legal men’s and women’s races. The men’s division had ten athletes representing five universities, including Colorado Mesa, CU Boulder, Utah, Wyoming and Colorado State. The women’s NCAA division had 49 athletes representing twelve universities, including Arizona State, Black Hills State, Colorado Mesa, Colorado State, Daemen College, Northern Vermont University, United States Air Force Academy, University of California Berkeley, CU Boulder, South Dakota, Utah and Wagner College. The non-draft collegiate competition followed with 98 athletes (50 women and 48 men) representing Colorado School of Mines, CSU, CU Boulder, Wyoming, and USAFA. Sprint triathlon and team relay waves followed the collegiate start with 415 athletes in the triathlon and 30 relay teams.

Clear skies and mild temperatures made for perfect conditions at Union Reservoir in Longmont. The course started with a 750-meter square left-hand swim course around four neon yellow buoys. The water was calm and temperatures were in the low-mid 70’s making it reasonably comfortable for those who did not care to swim in wetsuits. The 13-mile bike course led riders out of the reservoir north on County Rd 1, east on Route 66, south on County Road 7 and back east on 119. All intersections were well controlled and large sections of the course were coned off in high traffic areas to provide the riders separation from automobiles. The run course led athletes through the race village past the vendor and club tents, spurring energy and excitement for spectators and athletes alike. Runners donned costumes adding to the “let your fun flag fly” vibe. Costumed or not, the runners headed on to the gravel out-and-back course with an energetic aid station located a mile from the race village. The finish line was lined
with spectator cheering and partying to the beat of race music.

After the race, athletes enjoyed good music and great food catered by Wahoos. The post-race party was capped off with the awards ceremony recognizing the serious competition of more than 700 athletes.

The collegiate competitions posted fast times. Nick Dorsett took out the men’s draft legal race with a time of 00:58:10, while Hannah Henry from ASU bested the rest of the NCAA women with a time of 1:00:04. In the non-draft collegiate race Jack Toland from CU Boulder won the men’s competition with a 00:56:28 and Kelly Grier of USAFA won the women’s with 1:09:58. In the age grouper sprint race 49 year old Kevin Konczak from Boulder won the overall with at time of 59 minutes even and 29 year old Caitlan Standifer of Boulder was the overall winner for women with a 1:05:39.

Complete results here

Thanks to Lance Panigutti, the entire Without Limits Productions crew and volunteers for putting on a fantastic 2018 season. I’m already looking forward to 2019!

Missing Terry Laughlin of Total Immersion Swimming

The swimming and triathlon communities grieve the passing of Terry Laughlin, founder of Total Immersion Swimming.

As reported in Slowtwitch:

Terry Laughlin, the innovative swim technique pioneer whose Total Immersion system taught swimmers of all abilities and ages to swim in a slipperier, more fishlike manner, died Friday of complications related to his two-year fight with metastatic prostate cancer.

In a release on behalf from Laughlin’s wife Alice and daughters Fiona, Carrie and Betsy, the family wrote: “After living with metastatic prostate cancer for two years (about which he blogged widely), Terry passed away on Friday, October 20th, 2017, of complications related to his condition.

303’s own Rich Soares had interviewed Terry a couple of times on his Mile High Endurance Podcast over the last year and has this to say about Terry:

“Terry Laughlin liked to be referred to as the Chief Optimist Officer at Total Immersion. He loved to share his passion for swimming and he generously shared his passion with the Mile High Endurance audience on a number of occasions. Terry described swimming like some people describe an Italian sports car or fine art, or how a foodie describes their favorite dessert.”

In Episodes 62, 71, and 82 Terry took the audience through the Total Immersion methodology, the importance of bi-lateral breathing for open water swimming, and a convincing explanation of why it is possible to take your swim to a new level by finding your ideal stroke rate.

Enjoy the interviews and the legacy our dear friend Terry leaves with us. Happy swimming Terry!

Ben Hoffman on Kona – “It’s a brutal savage race where anything can happen”

By Rich Soares

Ben Hoffman on Kona – “It’s a brutal savage race where anything can happen”

303Triathlon caught up with Colorado native and professional triathlete Ben Hoffman. Bound for IRONMAN World Championship in Kona, Ben talked to us about his training, Kona specific preparations, recent race performances, XTerra World Championships and more.

Three weeks from the Kona contest, Ben is in the middle of his biggest week (40+ hours) of training. He is a self-proclaimed volume responder and talked about some of his key workouts. This week’s training includes double-swims, bricks that include

160 miles on the bike followed by a 45-minute run, and a two hour run at 6 minute/mile pace. His heat adaptation training includes living and training in Tucson where he can train regularly over 100 degrees. His coach has prescribed specific sauna sessions – the exact frequency, duration and temperatures not revealed. Ben prefers to arrive in Kona one week prior to the race. “I’m better when I don’t get to Kona early. I like to finish my training in my own environment. The energy at Kona is amazing, but it starts to wear you down.”

We talked about how previous performances have prepared him for this year’s championship showdown. In 2014, Ben’s 2nd place finish in Kona was pivotal to changing his paradigm of what was possible. “In Kona, that component of self-belief is massive. [2014] confirmed the belief and raised it to a new level…why not win? You have to trust yourself and know that you can contend with the best guys in the world.” Earlier this year, Ben came in 3rd place at Ironman Boulder 70.3 behind Tim Don and Matt Charbot. Just this past month he came in 2nd in a sprint finish at 70.3 Santa Cruz against Braden Curry of New Zealand. Ben raced both Boulder and Santa Cruz 70.3 without much of a taper. Ben plans to use these races in his preparation strategy, and get the proper rest before the big contest on October 15th. “I’ll try to represent Colorado and the USA and make everyone proud. Whatever is in there, I’ll try to get it out on the day.”

Mile High Endurance Podcast: Run Your Fat Off

Another great book from Dr. Jason Karp. Hear key insights on how to get the fat off and keep it off with the book “Run Your Fat Off”. We also talk about the definition of metabolic efficiency, injury prevention and more. Hosts Rich Soares and Khem Suthiwan. Listen to the podcast.