Boulder’s Nick Noone Chosen as USAT’s Amateur Athlete of the Year

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced its roster of 2017 Age-Group Triathletes of the Year, an award presented annually by Garmin and selected by USA Triathlon’s Age Group Committee.

Nick Noone (Boulder, Colo.) claimed top honors for overall Men’s Age-Group Triathlete of the Year, while Kirsten Sass (McKenzie, Tenn.) earned the title of overall Women’s Age-Group Triathlete of the Year for the third consecutive year and fourth year in total (2013, 2015-2017).

Noone’s 2017 season began with an individual Olympic-distance victory at April’s USA Triathlon Collegiate Club National Championships in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, a performance that helped the University of Colorado to its eighth straight team title. He went on to claim the overall win at IRONMAN Santa Rosa in May, his first foray into the full-IRONMAN distance. In June, Noone claimed the men’s 18-24 age group title and placed ninth overall at IRONMAN 70.3 Victoria.

“With a 2017 season full of highs and lows, this is a humbling award to receive,” Noone said. “Many thanks to USA Triathlon, my family, and my CU Boulder and EMJ teammates.”

Full results at USAT

Research Participants Needed

My name is Todd Buckingham and I am a triathlete and PhD student at Michigan State. I’m doing my dissertation on triathletes and specifically, I’m looking at the variables our Garmin multisport watch measures.

 

It can be difficult for triathletes to tell what’s actually important to pay attention to with all the data the watch provides. This is why I am trying to see if any of the factors measured by the watch correlate with faster finish times in each of the three disciplines.

All the athletes have to do is take a short survey after completing an Olympic distance triathlon with his/her multisport watch. It can be ANY Oly race, anywhere! After wearing the watch during the race and pushing the ‘lap’ button after each discipline, they just have to copy the link to his/her data from Garmin Connect and paste it to the end of the survey.

 

Here is a link to Todd’s research website that has all of the details and instructions.

 

Here’s a link to Todd’s blog page

Colorado Triathlete honored with Spirit of Multisport Award from USAT

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – USA Triathlon today announced six winners of the 2016 Multisport Awards presented by Garmin, which recognizes USA Triathlon members who fueled the multisport lifestyle in the 2016 season:

Spirit of Multisport Award: Nancy Reinisch (Glenwood Springs, Colo.)

The Spirit of Multisport Award recognizes individuals who illustrate the positive spirit of the sport through acts of sportsmanship and leadership in multisport, with no deference to athletic ability. This award was given to Nancy Reinisch, a longtime triathlete, coach and cancer survivor from Glenwood Springs, Colorado.

Reinisch has competed in 97 triathlons over the past thirty years, and is hoping to reach 100 this summer to earn her place in USA Triathlon’s Century Club. She is the co-founder of the Roaring Fork Women’s Triathlon Team, where she has led 60 women each summer for the past 18 years to their first experience with the sport. She is also the creator of the Mother’s Day Mile, an immensely popular local race that raises thousands of dollars each year for the Advocate Safehouse Project of Garfield County.

Reinisch also trained, coached and guided visually-impaired paratriathlete Nancy Stevens for two years, ultimately resulting in a gold medal for Stevens in the women’s visually-impaired division at the ITU Triathlon World Championships in Lausanne, Switzerland, in 2006.

A two-time survivor of advanced breast cancer, Reinisch authored and published the 2008 book Chemosabee: A Triathlete’s Journey Through the First Year of Breast Cancer. She is a professional psychotherapist and the founder and facilitator of the Valley View Hospital Cancer Coffee Walk and Talk Group.

Read about the other five recipients HERE

7 Things You (Probably) Didn’t Know You Can Do With Your Garmin 920XT

By Alison Freeman, D3 Multisport

You’ve worn your Garmin for countless hours in the pool, on the road, and out on the trails. But you may not know that your Garmin can do a helluva lot more than just track your distance and pace. Here are seven of my favorite Garmin 920XT features, many of which I use week in and week out. Have a favorite that I didn’t mention? I’d love to hear about it.

Note: Many of these features require the Garmin Connect website, the Garmin Express desktop app, and/or the iPhone/Android/Windows phone Garmin Connect app.

Wireless / Bluetooth Sync

I’m really hoping that this is a super disappointing start to my list because you already know that you don’t have tophysically connect your Garmin to your computer in order to sync your workouts. You can sync wirelessly after setting up your home wireless network using Garmin Express, or you can sync to the Garmin Connect app on your phone using Bluetooth. Either way – no cords required.

More information about wireless setup can be found here

More information about pairing your phone with your Garmin can be found here

Phone Notifications

And just when you were thinking that my list was going to be a total bust … Did you know your Garmin can kinda be an iWatch? First you connect your Garmin to the iPhone/Android/Windows phone app on your phone. Then any time you open the app it will push phone notifications – like incoming texts and phone calls – to your Garmin. So, if you launch the app and head out on a ride with your phone in your jersey pocket (and, really, who doesn’t?), you can read your incoming texts and see who’s calling on your Garmin, while you’re riding, without ever touching your phone.

More information about pairing your phone with your Garmin can be found here

More information on phone notifications can be found here

Intervals

OK, so let’s say today’s workout is a bunch of repeats of the same interval – not hard to remember, but you reallydon’t want to have to stare at your watch and hit your Lap button at the start/end of every interval. Plus: precision. No problem! Just go to “Training,” select “Intervals,” and set up your 10x 1/4-mile intervals with 90 seconds rest. Hit “Do Workout” and your Garmin will tell you when to go fast and when to rest. Voila!

More information about intervals can be found here

Structured Workouts

Maybe today’s workout includes some horribly complex set of run or bike intervals, and – unlike with the single interval repeats – there’s simply no way that you’re going to be able to remember them. Again, no problem! Your Garmin can still tell you exactly what to do and when to do it. Just set up the workout on the Garmin Connect website and send it to your watch using that nifty wireless sync feature we already covered. Then, when you’re ready to do the workout, go to “Training,” select “My Workouts,” select your workout for today and hit “Do Workout.” Voila again!

More information about structured workouts can be found hereNOTE: If your workout intervals are set up in TrainingPeaks’ new structured workout builder, you can send the workout from TrainingPeaks right over to your Garmin. See the TrainingPeaks help article on this here

Routes

Here’s one that I don’t use a lot, but when I do it’s mission-critical: if you’re running/riding a new route and youdon’t want to get lost, you can set up the route on the Garmin Connect website, send it to your watch using that nifty wireless sync feature, and then follow the route on your watch. (It’ll be hidden under “Navigation,” in “Courses.”) It does take some paying attention to follow the route because it’s a line without a map underneath, and so it helps to play with the scale to make sure you see the turn before you miss it. But once you get the hang of it, the course map will keep you from inadvertently adding several errant miles onto your day.

More information about routes (which Garmin calls courses) can be found here

Live Track

A “LiveTrack” is a website with a live feed of your ride (or run), which can be made available for 24 hours after yourride/run ends. This is a feature that I use EVERY SINGLE TIME that I ride outdoors. Why? Because if I don’t come back, then someone knows where to start looking. Also, if I run into mechanical issues, then it’s really easy to let my ride know where to find me. I’ve even used the LiveTrack + Phone Notifications to receive texts from my husband with weather updates based on where I am and where I’m heading. (“Turn around and ride fast! Storm heading straight for you.”) Within the Garmin Connect app on your phone, you simply go to “More” and “LiveTrack,” enter one or more email addresses, then hit “Start LiveTrack” to send the web link to your support crew.

Custom Alerts

The last of my favorite features is great for long rides and runs where you want to stay on schedule for your nutrition: You can set up custom alerts at specified intervals, with specified messages. On bike rides, my watch reminds me every fifteen minutes to “Drink!”. If you want to take salt tabs every 40 minutes, you can set an alert for that. If you want to tell yourself to suck it up every 1.75 miles, you can set an alert for that – just go to “Activity Settings” and “Alerts” and you’re in business. The possibilities are endless. (Just remember that alerts are specific to the activity, so if you set up an alert for Bike, it’ll stop reminding you when it’s time to Run.)

More information about custom alerts can be found here