8 Fitness Trends for 2018

Kickboxing, functional movement flow and brain-training… check out all the latest research-supported trends as reported by by Pete McCall at the American Council on Exercise

This is the perfect opportunity to gaze into the future and attempt to predict what will happen in the fitness industry over the coming year.

Based on wide-ranging research and numerous conversations with colleagues working for health clubs, equipment companies and education organizations, I’ve identified some of the fitness trends we are most likely to see in the coming year. The trends listed below, although not an exhaustive list by any means, represent opportunities for you to increase your knowledge as a health and fitness professional, and identify potential areas of growth in 2018.

(Note: If you’d like to judge the accuracy of my soothsaying abilities, here are the trend lists for 2017, 2016, 2015 and 2014. It’s a shame I can’t make the same predictions about the outcomes of football games or the stock market.)

1
Boxing and kickboxing workouts will experience a resurgence in popularity.

Recently, there has been an increase in the number of studios opening up to offer these physically demanding workouts, as well as an increase in the number of boxing/kickboxing classes showing up on group fitness schedules.

2
2018 will make a rediscovery of functional training.

After years of high-intensity interval training reigning supreme, 2018 will make a rediscovery of functional training that emphasizes movement quality over load and intensity. Lashaun Dale, vice president for content and programming at 24 Hour Fitness who specializes in being a futurist for the fitness industry, suggests that class programming will shift toward an emphasis on what she calls “conscious movement,” as opposed to simply pushing the intensity of a workout to reach the point of exhaustion.

3
Fitness programs will become more mindful with instructors and trainers incorporating various strategies to promote flow states via exercise…

Check out the full article for more trends including mindful exercise, brain training, and more.

 

Read the full story

Resolution Ready: Brain Training in conjunction with Physical Training Aids Memory

From The New York Times

A recent NY Times article discussed a study examining how exercise may enhance the effects of brain training.

Exercise broadly improves our memories and thinking skills, according to a wealth of science.

The evidence supporting similar benefits from so-called brain training has been much iffier, however, with most people performing better only on the specific types of games or tasks practiced in the program.

But an interesting new study published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience suggests that combining intense exercise and brain training might, over time, amplify the benefits of both for the brain, even in people whose minds already are working well…

… To find out, the researchers decided to study a group of healthy, young college students, a group that would be expected to have robust and vigorous memories. If an experimental program resulted in better memories in these people, the scientists reasoned, it should also have implications for those of us whose aging memories might be starting to stutter and fade…

… In general, the young people who had exercised, whether they also brain trained or not, were then more physically fit than those in the control group. They also, for the most part, performed better on memory tests. And those improvements spanned different types of memory, including the ability to rapidly differentiate among pictures of objects that looked similar, a skill not practiced in the brain-training group.

These enhancements in memory were most striking among the volunteers whose fitness had also improved the most, especially if they also practiced brain training.

In effect, more fitness resulted in stronger memories, Dr. Heisz says, with the brain training adding to that effect, even for a type of memory that was not part of the training.

Read the full article (link)