303’s Coverage of Kona, Why? For You and Us–all of Us.

By Bill Plock, President of 303Endurance/Triathlon/Cycling

People often wonder why 303 goes to Kona to cover the IRONMAN World Championships. Or ask why 303 even exists? Who we are and so forth. When Sandi Weibe crossed the finish line last year wearing a shirt we had given athletes from Colorado, it just seemed so clear and that picture pretty much answers our why. We go to Kona and to the local school yard bike rallies, local triathlons and crits and everything in between as much as possible to help make our endurance community that much better. That much more connected and simply that much more celebrated.

At arguably the worlds most prestigious endurance event, stories unfold, missions come to life and the triathlon world converges in a showcase unique to the sport. It’s the place to be.

We are there to celebrate the journey of the 52 Colorado athletes racing on October 12th. We want to tell their stories. We have asked each one of them to share their journey and hopefully in the next 10 days you will read and hear many of them.

If there is one gesture that defines the reason, it is our offer to each athlete of a handmade Christmas Ornament designed and made by Glassmith2. They are a second generation engraving company based in Boulder and they make the age group awards for IRONMAN.

Braden Todd, Owner of Glassmith2

But more, they are a couple, Alison and Braden Todd, with kids and a dog and an entrepreneurial spirit trying to make a small business succeed. They are great people and Braden is a sixth generation Boulderite. Braden’s great grandfather was the first person ever graduate from the University of Colorado. It’s this kind of connection that we strive to bring to the endurance community.

When Sandi crossed the finish line wearing a shirt, not really designed to race in, I was so touched she wanted to represent Colorado, just like we do. In such an international atmosphere, to see our logo cross the line meant a lot.

Khem Suthiwan
Rich Soares

We try to make it fun, we work hard. We interview all kinds of people, give you podcasts to listen to all week and find stories and cover the race. We try to share the experience of the island and bring you more than just recap of who won. We strive to share the culture, the atmosphere and the friends we see and make along the way. And Khem Suthiwan’s food scavenger hunt was a big hit last year—lets see what she comes up with this year.

We have Rich Soares’ awesome finish line interviews and podcasting excellence and Kenny Withrow’s artistic views through the camera–he also on assignment for a major publication so we won’t have him full-time–dang it!!

We have great sponsors that make this possible with some outstanding exclusive discounts to offer you from Clever Training and BASE Performance, and a chance to win a frame from Blue Competition Cycles and much more to be announced soon. Check out that deal on an indoor trainer from CycleOps. We have a landing page that shares not only the names of who is racing, but a place to find articles and podcasts, sponsors specials and some fun stuff–and of course the sponsors offers and more https://303triathlon.com/kona2019/

We will be bringing you events all week and feature stories on people like Beth and Liza from Crested Butte, check out this video on them from NBC https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MA5AJCtQRaY

Kennett Peterson with Mike Reilly at IM Boulder 2019

We just finished a podcast with professional Kennett Peterson of Boulder as he prepares for his first trip to Kona, keep an eye out for that. He gives some really great insight on what he is thinking and feeling heading into his race and some other thoughts on being a pro triathlete.

Simon Butterworth winning Kona

Locally we have some the best resources around to offer you tips if you are racing. One such person (“lad” is a better word in his Scottish accent) is Simon Butterworth has offered three major tips for racing in Kona. That article will be published soon. Very interesting tip about waiting to drink at least 30 minutes after the swim to let the sea water invariably “drank” settle in.

But settle in, follow us here, on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, grab a cup of coffee, a beer, a friend and enjoy our coverage.

Aloha,

The 303 Team!

Staying motivated in the Winter

Pro Triathlete, Brittany Warly of Blue Competition Cycles

I get asked the question “how do you stay motivated in the winter?” quite often really. I am human, like everyone else, and the cold, dark mornings make it that much more difficult to get out of my warm bed in the morning. I have a number of tricks/ideas that I use in the winter months especially to stay motivated and maintain consistency in my daily training.

  1. Find yourself some training partners.
    Having training partners is a great way not only to hold yourself accountable, but also to keep the sport fun and fresh. A training camp can also be a great way to change your perspective and environment, while motivating you to work hard on the daily. Surround yourself with like-minded people and it’s amazing what you can do together.
  2. Plan out your season goals.
    Before the next season begins, I like to write out specific outcome-based goals, and then process-related goals of how I will get there. I also like to plan my early season races, which gives me incentive to build fitness in the off-season. A goal on the horizon, can make a significant difference when it comes to finding motivation to train.
  3. Music.
    Music has been a great friend of mine in the winter, especially to keep me motivated and entertained while on the trainer with my Blue AC1 Limited Road Bike or running on the dreadmill (yes I spelled that correctly). I also like to have different genres of music based on the purpose of each workout. Even when the body doesn’t feel great, music has a way of inspiring.
  4. Go outside
    Even when it is cold outside, sometimes it can be beneficial and give you a fresh perspective to bundle up and run outside. Think of the snow on the ground as a change of scenery and fresh perspective on your typical running routes. Every Wednesday, I run a 6 am sunrise run with my roommate, Caryn. We both bundle up and hit the roads with our headlamps. It’s a nice morning adventure that motivates me to wake up early 🙂
  5. Yoga.
    Practicing mindfulness in the form of yoga or meditation can be very helpful in defining your purpose, letting go of your past, and channeling your energy to future goals. Given I have a body-type that struggles in the cold, the heated sessions especially are beneficial to my overall recovery and ability to relax.
  6. Get in the gym and hit it hard!
    In the summer season, it’s typically race season so gym training is usually a supplement to training and not the core part of training/racing. In the winter time, change it up by hitting the gym hard three times per week. Gym has become one of my workouts in the winter. Building strength will translate to a stronger, healthier body when the season comes around.

303 Cyber Monday Specials

Tis the season for discounts for your favorite endurance athlete! Here are a few partners from 303 offering you smoking deals to kick off your holiday season!

 


Blast Radius Coffee
Check out the special Blast Radius Gift Pack. It’s perfect for those coffee-loving caffeine junkies on your holiday gift list. Enjoy the Cyber Monday discount of 15% off on all online orders. Enter the code “303C15″at checkout. Promotion expires Dec 3rd.

https://blastradiuscoffee.com/


Blue Competition Cycles
Special Cyber Monday Offer from Blue Competition Cycles. Get a FREE Stages Power Meter with the purchase of any Triad Elite triathlon super-bike.  Use discount code: “Stages303exclusive”

https://rideblue.com/triathlon-bikes/


Coeur Sports
40% off Coeur Clothing online purchases. Use discount code: “COEURNACOPIA” at checkout.

http://www.coeursports.com/


D-Curve Optics
Enjoy 40% OFF all Snow Goggles, Helmets and Sunglasses from DCURVE, a Colorado optics company. Use code “303deal40” at checkout.

https://www.dcurve.com/


Feedback Sports
20% off any order PLUS free shipping on Cyber Monday with the code “elf20” at https://www.feedbacksports.com/.


iKOR Labs
20% Cyber Monday discount, use the discount code “Endurance” at checkout.

http://ikorlabs.com/


Infinit Nutrition
20% off site-wide (excludes gift cards). Yes, even custom blends are included in the Cyber Monday deal!

https://www.infinitnutrition.us/


Inspired Training Center
Buy two rides get one free for $40. This Give and Receive package makes you look like a hero, AND you get an extra training session to use at your convenience.

Please follow THIS LINK to access your Give and Receive package


Solos Smart Glasses
Get your $150 of Cyber Monday Savings by using the discount code: SOLOS+303 at checkout.

https://www.solos-wearables.com/product/solos-smart-glasses/


Stryd Running Power Meters
Buy two Stryds for $345.60 ($26.20 off per Stryd).

To access this Cyber Monday promotion, click here.


 

303 Team’s Takeaways from Kona

By Bill Plock

The 303 team kept busy all last week in Kona bringing you news and stories, here are few highlights.

 

People wonder why we send such a group to this race and the answer is not simple, but yet it is. Kona showcases the greatest triumphs. It celebrates athletes from around the world with 2,400 stories from over 50 countries. Colorado is everywhere. From third most represented state of athletes to having many companies and industry and media professionals present. At the USAT partner party, half of the people there were from Colorado. Colorado has a big impact on Kona.

 

 

1. Colorado rocks with 38 amateur athletes competing and five of them ending up on the podium:

– Nicholas Noon 2nd
– Kelly Phuah 3rd
– Diana Hassel 3rd
– Matthew Malone 4th, this was also a 45th place finish Overall
– Simon Butterworth 4th

2. Four Colorado based pro’s ended up in the top 10:

– Tim O’Donnell 4th
– Mirinda Carfrae 5th
– Kaisa Sali 7th
– Andy Potts 8th

 

3. Records were broken

– Fastest Male race: 7:52, Patrick Lange, first time finish was under 8 hours.
– Fastest Female race: 8:26, Daniela Ryf, broke her own record by 20 minutes!
– Fastest Male swim ever: 46:30 (amateur set the record)
– Fastest Female swim ever: 48:14 (Pro Lucy Charles, 4 min faster than the next pro)
– Fastest Female Bike Split, (Pro Daniela Ryf, 4:26, 18 min faster than previous)
– Oldest finisher, 86 year old Inada Hiromu of Japan

 

 

4. Presumably, the most weight loss finisher with Marcus Cook losing about 250 pounds and carrying a life size cut-out of himself at his most weight through the finish line that brought a massive roar from the crowd.

 

 

 

 

5. More people seem interested in what Khem was eating than almost anything else based on our Facebook post of her “guess what I am eating contest”.

 

 

 

 

 

6. Colorado has great industry representation: BASE Performance, Newton, BOCO Gear, Triathlete Magazine, Rudy Project, Ceramic Speed, Stryd, Scratch, Stages, and TrainingPeaks.

 

 

7. Simon Butterworth and Bob Babbitt do look like Elvis

 

8. The Pros have fun too: Patrick Lange proposed to his girlfriend right after he crossed the finish line saying it “was the best part of day”, after winning and breaking a record. Sarah True said, “I felt like I was just riding bikes with friends,” after finishing her first Kona.

 

9. Bill Plock Sleepwalks and tries to get out of a condo in the middle of the night.

 

10. The 303 team went through six bags of gummy bears, 2 tanks of gas, shot over 500 pics, conducted 8 live podcast interviews, swam to the coffee boat a few times, was up at 4am and back home at 1am covering the race from beginning to end.

The team was graciously sponsored by:

 

 

Infinit Nutrition

Coeur Sports

Base Performance

Blue Competition Cycles

30 DAYS TO KONA: Sponsor Spotlight: Blue Competition Cycles

Thinking about a triathlon bike for next season? Or maybe adding aero bars to your road, here are some thoughts from Blue Competition Cycles.

Everyone knows you can go faster by increasing your power output on the bicycle. Those who are into triathlon have spent hundreds, if not thousands of hours working to improve their power and efficiency on the bike. But a missing element for many is how to improve their speed on the bicycle at the same power. Aerodynamics holds the key to getting a faster bike split – wind drag is the number one force against you and prevents you from going faster on the bike. It’s not tire friction or the weight of the bicycle that matters most but the air force against the forward motion that slows you down. Wind drag increases exponentially with an increase in speed, so, in order to go only a few miles per hour faster you have to overcome a greater force.

Many people start off on a road bike for their first triathlon, maybe next they transition to the road bike with aero bars and then make the leap and buy a triathlon bike. Each time they think it means they will go faster. The real results they see may not change much or they may be going a bit faster because they have now put in more training and have some experience. Some people would be surprised to find they are riding in a non-ideal position for aerodynamics even on a triathlon bike. In order to maximize speed you have to understand how body position plays a key role.

The two primary ways to go faster are to 1. increase the power on the pedals and 2. increase aerodynamics. The trick seems to be doing one without hurting the other.

Lets look at the aerodynamic aspects of both the body and the bike. An example of a bicycle designed to maximize aerodynamics is the latest on the market for BLUE Competition Cycles the Triad Elite. This triathlon superbike utilizes SFT2 (Super Flow Tube Technology) tube shapes that are narrow and wing-shaped. The SFT2 carbon-fiber tubes slip through the wind easier as they allow air to flow over the tubes like the wing of a plane. This bike has aero covers on the front brake to reduce frontal area drag combined with an aero cover over the bottom bracket and rear brake to increase aerodynamics even further. While an aero bicycle will shave time off your Ironman bike split in order to maximize aerodynamics your body needs to also be more aero. This means your torso is in a horizontal position compared to the direction of the air flow and your head is lower than your shoulders. When you get in this position however their are several issues that come up regarding bike fit that may reduce your power with a net zero increase in speed. If you try to get in an aero position on a standard road bike your hips are not tilted forward so it is difficult to lean very far forward. A triathlon bicycle like the BLUE Triad Elite has a steeper seat tube angle than a traditional road bike. This steeper angle allows you to be more directly over the bottom bracket instead of behind it like on a road bike. This helps push your hips into a forward position allowing you to bend forward more and be lower on the front of the bicycle and utilize a lower handlebar position. As an example of the savings for estimation purposes we used a bicycle power vs. speed calculator to see the speed difference of riding a road bike vs an aero triathlon bike in a 112 mile Ironman bike leg. A 150lb rider producing 200 watts on a road bike in a more upright position would take between 5 hrs 20 min to 5 hrs 40 min (making some broad assumptions about factors such as wind and terrain). The same rider outputting the same power on a triathlon bike in an optimized aero position could ride it in 4 hrs 54 min to 5 hrs 10 min. Even if the rider had slightly less power in the triathlon position they are still going substantially faster. As a reference point if the same rider’s road bike was 1lb. lighter than their triathlon bike it would only shave 1 minute from their bike time.

 

The additional benefit to this “triathlon” position is it allows you to utilize your hamstrings and gluts on the bike so that your quads are not doing all the work. Done correctly this can help in that dreaded transition from bike to run so that your quad muscles are fresher for the run part of the race. A critical aspect to a good aero position is a balance between aerodynamics and power. Since you are leaned forward more you don’t want to decrease the angle between your torso and thigh so much that you lose power at the top of the pedal stroke. It is not an easy combination to figure out but a bike fit expert can help you setup your triathlon bike to maximize your power and increase aerodynamics.

If you ever find yourself riding along on the Queen K highway in early October surrounded by three or four Ironman Champions, you better hope you are riding a fast bike and in the best position possible. Why? Because you know you are going to have one heck of a race on your hands and going to need several things to go your way. You are going to need to save as much energy for that run to follow and you are going to need to come off the bike able to use that energy you saved.