IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder: Prices are Gonna’ Rise

IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder – August 4, 2018

With a flat, fast bike course and spectacular views of the Flatirons, IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder is an event you don’t want to miss out on this summer.

Entries are selling fast, as 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder will offer qualifying slots to the 2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in Nice, France.

Register TODAY before the price increases to Tier 3.

Tri Coach Tuesday: Get Ready for your Run

D3Multisport Coach Mike demonstrates three of his favorites exercises for  activating your muscles prior to a run.  This is an important step toward having a smooth, strong run.

Triathlon Minute, Episode 109 – 3 Run Activations from D3 Multisport on Vimeo.

Tri Coach Tuesday: Training with Power

By Tim Cusick, TrainingPeaks

 

For cyclists and triathletes, training with power is likely the most effective way to maximize results. Why? Power meters and the data they provide remove a lot of the guesswork from training by supplying precise, accurate information for accurate measurement of training intensity and load, unlike heart rate training or rate of perceived exertion (RPE) training.

Even when athletes recognize that power training offers significant benefits, many of them are apprehensive about jumping into the power-training game because they’ve heard it’s complex and they aren’t sure they have the knowledge or technical skills to get the most out of it.

I’d like to make it easier. Here are a few simple steps to get started with power training and how to better understand the entire power training process.

 

Step 1: Ride with power

The first thing your should do after you buy a new power meter is set up your head unit with some key metrics to track. I suggest setting power, heart rate, and speed to display on the screen.

And then just ride, observe and record. That’s all you should do for two to four weeks. Don’t change anything about your riding or training yet. Simply observe and begin to quantify your efforts.

Be sure to record all your workouts, no matter how small. It’s pretty simple to automate the recording and uploading process, and these records will become your data diary and will be highly useful in the future.

This first step gives you time to get a feeling for the relationship between power and effort, along with a basic understanding of the quantification of training. If you went up a short hill, did it feel hard? Your power meter now gives a number for “hard.” Hard for you might be 450 watts or 600 watts. Soft pedal down the other side of the hill and watch how many watts that generates.

 

Original post here

IRONMAN Boulder Race Director Tim Brosious was on FB Live

On Thursday evening, IRONMAN Boulder RD Tim Brosious was on FB Live to talk about upcoming changes for the June 10 event. Most notable are the changes to the bike course and the point to point run course.

Watch, learn and prepare.

 

Weekend Preview: SPRING!

Triathlon Events

Saturday March 24th

 

Criterium 101: by ALPS RACING

Boulder


Sunday March 25th

 

Lavaman Waikoloa Triathlon

Waikoloa, Hi

 



Cycling Events

Friday March 23rd

 

GiddyUP! Film Tour

Colorado Springs


Saturday March 24th

 

BRAC MotoRef Clinic

Colorado Springs


Criterium 101: by ALPS RACING

Boulder

Tri Coach Tuesday: Pacing & Nutrition

by Jon (Mace) Mason, Head Coach MPMultisport

 

Long-Course Race Execution: All about Pacing and Nutrition

 

We’ve all witnessed the athlete that posts every workout on social media for months before their big Ironman. Epic days in the saddle over 140 miles, double and triple bricks taking up the entire weekend, runs that would make Alberto Salazar drool.   They approach the starting line looking like a Greek god, lean, strong, and ready to take on the world.  14 hours later they have been limited to the “Ironman Shuffle”, hours from their goal just happy to finish.  What happened?

 

Introducing the 4th and 5th disciplines: Pacing and Nutrition (not in any particular order)

Pacing or racing at a percentage of your threshold Heart Rate, Functional Threshold of Power (FTP), or pace/speed is absolutely imperative to crossing the finish line near the potential of your ability. If you don’t have a specific number in your head for the Bike and the Run as you read this it’s time to get evaluated.  You can ask any qualified coach or sports science institute to have your threshold tested and determined on the bike and run via Lactate Threshold (LT) testing or as simple as a testing protocol on the trainer or treadmill.  Besides LT testing, we have found great success nailing an athlete’s threshold level using the Wahoo Kickr™ trainers for the bike and a treadmill or the track for the run.  Your threshold level will also change as your progress in your training so they need to be reevaluated at least every 6 weeks.  Your pacing plan could be somewhere in the range of 75-88% of threshold for full-distance and 78-90% for half-distance but very individualized based on past race performance, training, and your discipline strengths.

With nutrition, there is no magic ingredient or formula for everyone attempting a long-course race.  Most of us get in the habit of reading Elite athlete blogs or a race report from somebody that just punched their ticket to Kona and adapt to their plan of number of calories, carbs, electrolytes, and funky colored stuff in the water bottle.  It is highly individual based on your body type, physiologically how your body processes and absorbs nutrients, race experience, training, and race day weather. What your coach or nutritionist should do is give you guidance to practice months out in the same environment of your race to develop a nutrition plan as important as a race plan and pacing plan.

  1. Avoid the gut rot of gels and chewables as much as possible by consuming solid “real” foods at least the first 75% of the bike. If you wouldn’t eat this stuff on a normal day in the office, why would you eat it during your most important race?  My favorites are energy balls, pancake sandwiches, broth, and portables.
  2. Don’t forget liquids.  Roughly one bottle of hydration (preferably electrolytes) per hour, more if the weather is hot or if you have a large stature or heavy sweater.
  3. Percentage of calories, carbs, and nutrients from liquids increases as you approach the run leg due to GI distress experienced by most athletes
  4. Percentages from liquids increase as weather heats up.  Your body absorbs and processes slower as temperature increases.
  5. Aim for 200-600 calories, 30-50g Carbs, 500-1000mg of Na PER HOUR from solid and liquid on the bike.
  6. On the run, highly individual to what you can get in.  The numbers above are reduced to the lower range.  Keep the nutrition plan together as long as you can, be flexible and listen to your body.  Sometimes Coca-Cola or a Red Bull is heaven’s nectar!

 

Original blog post here

Doping: Pozzetta Suspended – Always Check “High Risk” List

PICTURE SHOWS COMPLETE ENTRY FROM USADA SUPPLEMENT 411 for MetaSalt.

By Mark Cathcart

Every now and again a triathlete is suspended for failing controlled substance test. More often than not, the announcement is made by the IRONMAN® Anti-Doping Program and sometimes from USAT. This week, it was announced that American professional athlete Lucas Pozzetta  accepted a six-month suspension for an anti-doping rule violation after testing positive for a prohibited substance from a contaminated product.

It’s actually less than easy to find out what the contaminated product is, and since I’ve managed and worked with a number of professional triathletes, and am vehemently against athlete doping, I always do my best to keep up to date, especially when it comes to contaminated products. For various legal reasons(I guess?) the products are almost never discussed in the press release announcing the findings. That’s what happened in this case. No named product.

I went and checked the High Risk List and while there is no indication of a link between Pozzetta and MetaSalt, it’s worth noting that MetaSalt has been updated on the High Risk List (see attached entry). In this case, we had a bottle on the shelf in the pantry. Unfortunately since there is no batch number, or other unique qualifying detail, I can only implore you to discard this if you have it, I did.

Racing Clean is not just the purview of pro’s and age group winners, it is an important stance for all of us to take. It’s not sufficient to just demand more testing, that would come at an enormous cost. It’s estimated it costs some $300,000 to catch one cheat. I don’t want that bill added to my race entry price. Train clean, race pure.

Weekend Preview: Happy Weekend

Triathlon Events

Saturday March 17th

 

MCTC Regional Championships & Havasu Triathlon

Lake Havasu City, Az


Sunday March 18th

 

7th Annual Rock Classic Swim Meet

Castle Rock



Cycling Events

Saturday March 17th

 

Pedaling for St. Pat’s

Colorado Springs


CSU Cobb Lake Road Race

Ft. Collins


St. Patricks Day Ride

Glendale


4SOH

Ft. Collins


Leadville Winter Series 50k

Leadville


Sunday March 18th

CSU Oval Criterium

Ft. Collins


Staunton Spring Fatty Frenzy – Cancelled

Pine

 

Broomfield to host Trail Marathon in November

By Jennifer RiosStaff Writer Broomfield News

 

Broomfield’s first-ever marathon will highlight wildlife, local trail systems and stunning Rocky Mountain views.

Broomfield Rotary Club and A Precious Child will be hosting the city’s inaugural Broomfield Trails Marathon along with a half marathon, 10K and 5K race. The four races will take place Nov. 4.

“Runners start planning out their year and races early on,” Sara Farris, spokeswoman with North Metro Fire Rescue District, said, “so we want to give people ample time to set their schedules and be able to register early, get a spot and set their training schedule.”

Farris, who is helping with marketing for the race, said organizers thought this race would provide another opportunity for long-distance runners. The race begins and ends in Broomfield and travels through portions of Westminster and Boulder County.

“Another unique aspect to the race that really drove the inspiration for this is really highlighting the trail system in Broomfield and the surrounding area,” Farris said. “It sets Broomfield apart and focuses on open and green space. We want to show off those great features and bring people to the area and show what it has to offer.”

 

Complete article HERE