Arizona State, Colorado Mesa Win at Women’s Collegiate Triathlon West Regional Qualifier

From USA Triathlon

Photo by Jessica Welk/USA Triathlon

The second of three Regional Qualifiers for the varsity women’s collegiate triathlon season was held Sunday in South Dakota, hosted by NCAA Division II triathlon program Black Hills State University. The race marked the second opportunity for teams and individuals to qualify for the Women’s Collegiate Triathlon National Championships, set for Nov. 16 in Tempe, Arizona.

Athletes completed a sprint-distance 750-meter swim, 20-kilometer draft-legal bike and 5-kilometer run. Awards were presented to the top-two individuals in each NCAA Division (DI, DII and DIII) and the top-two teams in DI and DII. There were not enough competing athletes from DIII programs to award a team score in that division.

Arizona State’s Kyla Roy, Audrey Ernst, Kira Stanley and Hannah Henry were the first four athletes across the line overall, as Roy took the DI individual victory with a time of 1 hour, 1 minute, 12 seconds. Colorado Mesa University’s Mazzy Jackson was the top DII finisher in 1:06:04, placing eighth in the overall field. Earning the DIII individual win was Northern Vermont University-Johnson’s Ellery Kiefer in 1:15:41, taking 22nd overall.

ASU was the top NCAA DI team on the day with six points, followed in the DI standings by the University of South Dakota with 19. USD’s Ella Kubas led the Coyotes with a fifth-place finish both overall and in her division, crossing the line in 1:05:30.

Colorado Mesa took top honors for DII teams with seven points, and Black Hills State was second with 16. Mathilde Bernard led the Black Hills State squad, finishing third in the DII standings and 13th overall with a time of 1:08:25.

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Paralympians Allysa Seely, Mark Barr Win ESPYS

From USA Triathlon

Two of paratriathlon’s biggest stars were honored Wednesday night in Los Angeles at the ESPY Awards, ESPN’s annual celebration for all things sports.

Paralympians Allysa Seely and Mark Barr took home the ESPYS for best female and male athletes with a disability, honored for their dominant 2018 seasons.

Seely, who won gold at the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, logged a perfect season in 2018 on the ITU Paratriathlon World Series circuit, culminating in a gold medal at the ITU Paratriathlon World Championships in Gold Coast, Australia, which marked her third career world title in the women’s PTS2 category. Seely’s season earned her USA Triathlon’s Elite Paratriathlete of the Year honors for 2018.

She has continued that win streak this season with first-place finishes at the first three stops on the circuit in Milan, Italy; Yokohama, Japan and Montreal, Quebec.

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U.S. Olympian Joe Maloy to Lead USA Triathlon Collegiate Recruitment Program

From USA Triathlon

Maloy to lead talent transfer of single-sport NCAA runners and swimmers to elite triathlon

Photo: Nils Nilsen

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced that 2016 U.S. Olympian Joe Maloy has been hired as coordinator of the USA Triathlon Collegiate Recruitment Program (CRP), which identifies and recruits top-level NCAA runners and swimmers to elite triathlon. A member of the USA Triathlon High Performance staff, Maloy started on June 24 and will work remotely out of Southern California.

Maloy fills the role previously held by 2004 U.S. Olympian Barb Lindquist, who founded the CRP in 2009 and resigned as program manager last month. Lindquist remains a consultant for the USA Triathlon high performance staff.

“USA Triathlon is proud to bring another Olympian onto our staff — not only to build on the strong foundation of the CRP, but also to develop its future in new and innovative ways,” said John Farra, High Performance General Manager at USA Triathlon. “Joe’s background as a collegiate swimmer, ITU triathlete and Olympian lends him an authenticity that will be key to recruiting the right athletes to the CRP. I know Joe is ready to hit the ground running as we approach Tokyo 2020 and the next Olympic quadrennial.”

The CRP fast-tracks the talent transfer of single-sport collegiate runners and swimmers who have the potential to be elite triathletes. Through active recruitment, assessment, mentorship, support and a full-time coaching environment within an elite squad, USA Triathlon has increased the quality and quantity of the next generation of potential Olympic medalists.

“Collegiate athletes who’ve transitioned to triathlon have enjoyed success at the sport’s highest levels,” Maloy said. “Barb Lindquist recognized an opportunity to introduce these athletes to our sport when she started USA Triathlon’s Collegiate Recruitment Program, and I’m looking forward to building upon that work. This is not only a great opportunity to help USA Triathlon find podium contenders for the Paris 2024 and Los Angeles 2028 Olympic Games, but it’s also a chance to introduce hard-working women and men to both a sport and a community that will positively impact their lives for years to come. “

Read the full press release here

American just made it cheaper to travel with bikes, surfboards, skis and tubas

American Airlines is eliminating its hefty oversize bag fees for large sports equipment and musical instruments ahead of the summer travel season.

From USA Today
By Dawn Gilbertson

Passengers checking items including surfboards, skis and bikes will now pay standard checked bag fees instead of an oversize bag fee of $150 each way on domestic flights. The fine print: like all checked bags, the items must not weigh more than 50 pounds or overweight bag fees of$150 for those items will kick in, though fees may vary.

The savings are significant: American charges $30 each way for the first checked bag and $40 for a second checked bag.

American said the new policy, which takes effect immediately, was based on feedback from customers and employees.

It also likely was a competitive move. Alaska Airlines eliminated a $75 surcharge for oversized sports equipment in 2017 and last year United Airlines cut the fees for surfboards on nonstop flights to and from California

American said certain oversize items, including antlers, hang gliders, scuba tanks and kite/windsurfing gear, will still be subject to the flat $150 fee because they require special handling.

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How These Colorado Students Learn to Run With a Buffalo

From Runner’s World
By Lisa Jhung

Photo: Dustin Bradford/Getty Images

Can you imagine corralling a 1,300-pound animal at full sprint?

Running with a 1,300-pound bison is not your average college extracurricular. Yet, each spring in late April as the semester draws to an end, students line up with hopes of being part of one of the University of Colorado-Boulder’s proudest traditions.

This year, 35 current and incoming students came out hoping to be handpicked to earn the coveted title of being one of the school’s “Ralphie Handlers.” Ralphie is the name of the bison, or buffalo as is the school mascot, that has led the home team onto the field at football games for the past 52 years.

As you can imagine, the university can’t let the large animal run by itself across the field. That’s where the handlers come in. They run by its side as Ralphie reaches speeds of up to 19 mph in a horseshoe-shaped route before being directed into a trailer by handlers who hold onto ropes on Ralphie’s harness.

“We have two people up front; they’re typically our faster people,” program director John Graves told Runner’s World. “They’re helping to control Ralphie’s direction as she runs around the field.” In back, you’ll find the biggest, strongest handler. “His job is to slow her down a little bit.” Two other handlers run on either side of her to help both direct and slow her down.

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Boulder’s Sam Long wins Chattanooga 70.3, 28mph Bike Split!

There are many story lines to Boulder’s Sam Long taking first place at yesterday’s IRONMAN Chattanooga 70.3, but this quote from the Facebook page of the Wednesday Morning Velo, sums up the local cheering (and maybe some jeering) that accompanied Sam to Tennessee. And is a testament to just how awesome of a performance he had finishing in 3:48:50.

Congrats to “Threshold Group” honcho, Sam Long, for taking the WIN at yesterday’s IRONMAN 70.3 Chattanooga, including a race best bike split of 2:04:06 for 56 miles… that’s almost 28mph! See if you can hang on next time Sam joins us at WMV

The official news from IRONMAN:

Boulder’s Sam Long worked hard to eliminate all of his +3:20 time deficit and 14th place finish in the swim over the 56-mile single loop bike course. Coming off the bike with lead and then laying down a solid 1:15:22 run, Long took the victory by a 1:53 winning margin over Jackson Laundry (CAN).

You can hear more about Sam on this interview on Mile High Endurance Podcast with Rich Soares and Bill Plock (of 303), LINK HERE

Kara Goucher Nearly Collides With Mountain Lion on Morning Training Run

The big cats are a regular part of life in Boulder, but the former Olympian wasn’t expecting to see one on a populated road.

From Runners World
By Jacob Meschke

Photo: Todd Ryburn Photography/Getty Images
  • Former Olympian Kara Goucher nearly collided with a mountain lion during a morning training run last Monday in Boulder, Colorado.
  • After an injury forced her to drop out of Houston Marathon in January, the 2:24:52 marathoner decided to try her hand at trail running.

Even Kara Goucher, 2:24:52 marathoner and mainstay of U.S. women’s distance running for over a decade, gets spooked sometimes. But when it’s a dangerous wild predator just inches away from you, that’s understandable.

Since the return of an old hamstring injury forced Goucher to drop out of January’s Houston Marathon after 16 miles—her first marathon attempt since her heartbreaking fourth-place finish at the 2016 Olympic Trials—Goucher has taken her running in a new direction: the trails.

After so much success on the road and track, the 2007 IAAF World Championships silver medalist in the 10,000 meters and three time top 10 Olympic finisher, now 40, is training to run the Leadville Trail Marathon on June 15.

Photo: Allen Krughoff/Hardcastle Photography LLC

Though she wants more time to acclimate to the new discipline, Goucher told Runner’s World, training in her home of Boulder, Colorado has been going well. That is, until she nearly collided with a mountain lion.

Read the full article here

Dirty Duo race, something Different!

This race is a bit different: All athletes start 150 meters from the start line (LeMans start) and run to their bike; AND there are no age or gender groups, pretty cool!

Lory State Park, just west of Fort Collins, boasts some of the best trails, views and surroundings for outdoor enthusiasts and athletes. The “Dirty Duo” Off Road Ride & Run puts athletes right in the center of those surroundings for an all out multisport race!

Athletes start 150 meters from the transition area in what’s called a LeMans start. When the horn goes off they’ll sprint to their bikes and take off! Racers can go as easy or hard as they’d like in this first section to attack for position.

Once on the bikes this unique 11.25 mile two loop course will challenge their legs and keep them inspired as they climb to see epic views of Horsetooth Reservoir. There are two loops down Lodgepole Rd which is flat, open and fast. This gives faster riders a chance to pass other athletes before getting back onto the tight & technical single track trails.

As riders blaze into transition they’ll start to climb again almost immediately once they leave on the 4 mile run. The run course is technical, twisty and offers great scenery just like the bike course.

This race has NO age groups, NO gender groups and a small athlete capacity of just 100 racers. The course promises soaring skies and some awesome trail terrain that will leave smiling and dirty by the end.

We created an event like this to connect athletes with a “grassroots” type of race experience. There’s no formal sanctioning, no formal age/gender rankings and it’s essentially you vs you on the mountain trails.

Fort Collins is a short 10 minute drive east. The area boasts some of the best local breweries around, bike friendly paths at every turn and a ton of activities all within minutes of iconic downtown – also known as “Old Town”. Don’t take our word for it – make a weekend out of this event and plan to get a little extra sight seeing done after your cleaned up from the mountain 🙂

IRONMAN officially coming back to Penticton

By Khem Suthiwan

It’s official! IRONMAN Canada is coming back to where it all started in the Okanagan Valley upon the shores of Okanagan Lake. Athletes will be able to partake in frozen goodies from the iconic giant peach (The Peach Ice Cream) and authentic poutine from establishments like burger 55.

IRONMAN Canada (Penticton) holds a special place in many people’s hearts. It was the first IRONMAN race in North America. For me it was my first ever IRONMAN finish, that race was the last time IRONMAN Canada was in Penticton (2012), and the 30th Anniversary.

Aside from Kona, this was by far my favorite 140.6 race on the circuit, and the oldest and longest running IRONMAN race (outside of Kona). That last year our favorite IronNun Sister Madonna Buder’s raced. There were also three friends known as the Three Dick Eds (Ed Wong, Ed Russell, and Dick Enslie), who have finished all but one of 30 races since its inception. So much history here and we are glad to know that it’s not over.

Here’s the official word from Penticton:

Ironman coming home

From Castanet.net
By Colin Dacre

Ironman is coming home to Penticton.

City council voted unanimously Tuesday to have city staff move forward with negotiating a five-year agreement with Ironman Canada to bring the iconic race back to the city.

“Ironman coming back to Penticton is like a divorced couple getting back together again,” said Coun. Julius Bloomfield, explaining he’s “delighted” by the idea.

While a contract needs to be finalized, councillors heard the preliminary proposal will see Penticton host the full-length edition of the race for five years starting in 2020 at an annual cost to taxpayers of $299,000 in cash and $111,000 in-kind support.

Mayor John Vassilaki was on council with Judy Sentes in 2012 when Penticton dumped Ironman during a disagreement over finances.

“At that time it was the right thing to do in the circumstances,” he said. “But you know, times change and we have to change with the times.”

“We need to bring this event back to the community,” Vassilaki, calling the required outlay required of taxpayers “smart money.”

Since Ironman left, MB Events has organized a triathlon in Penticton first under the Challenge banner and now Super League. Both races did not attract numbers anywhere near what Ironman did, although the ITU World Championships in 2017 drew more than 3,500 athletes.

Earlier Tuesday council heard a presentation from Ironman representative Dave Christen, who highlighted $8.8M in visitor spending recorded during the 2017 Ironman in Whistler.

He shared figures that showed the average athlete comes from a household income of $247,000, is 40 years old and is 92 per cent university educated.

“This is where Ironman Canada was born,” Christen said.“The energy that we built here, is something that we try to emulate everywhere else.”

Photo: Colin Dacre
Ironman’s Dave Christen before council Tuesday

The required $663,000 host city contribution is being softened considerably by the business community, with local hotels, Tourism Penticton and others pitching in $200,000. It’s hoped additional sponsors can be found.

The proposal expects 2,600 athletes in the first year, which would translate to upwards of 10,000 visitors to Penticton during Ironman weekend.

A large crowd packed into council chambers broke into applause and cheers when the unanimous vote passed.

Read the full article here

Eliud Kipchoge to challenge two-hour marathon time this Autumn

From INEOS.com

The sub two-hour marathon is the last great barrier of modern athletics.

Eliud Kipchoge, the world’s greatest marathon runner, will attempt to break the two-hour barrier in the INEOS 1.59 Challenge, a special marathon being run between late September and early October 2019.

Eliud Kipchoge, the world’s greatest marathon runner, will attempt to break the two-hour barrier in the INEOS 1.59 Challenge. Photo credit: DAN VERNON

The event will be supported and managed by INEOS. A London venue is being considered.

“Running the fastest ever marathon time of 2:00:25 was the proudest moment of my career,” says Eliud Kipchoge. “To get another chance to break the magical two-hour mark is incredibly exciting. I always say that no human is limited and I know that it is possible for me to break this barrier.”

Find out more at The INEOS 1:59 Challenge website at: https://www.ineos159challenge.com/ 

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