2020 U.S. OLYMPIC TRIATHLON TEAM TO BE NAMED WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16

From USA Triathlon

Summer Rappaport and Taylor Knibb have already punched their tickets to Tokyo.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon will announce its full 2020 U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team on Wednesday, June 16, unveiling the roster of athletes who will represent the United States at the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 this summer. The announcement will be made via press release and on USA Triathlon’s social channels at 9 a.m. MST. An hour later, the athletes will appear on Facebook Live to share their reactions and discuss preparations for the Tokyo Games, joined by Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO; John Farra, USA Triathlon High Performance General Manager; and Dedra DeLilli, Group Manager, Sponsorship, Integration & Auto Shows, Toyota Motor North America.

Athletes will be available for interviews on Zoom starting at 10:30 a.m. MST for the women’s team, and 11 a.m. MST for the men’s team. Click here to RSVP (must be a member of the media to attend); Zoom links will follow.

Olympic Qualification Process

A maximum of three athletes per country and gender (i.e., three men, three women) can race in Tokyo if three athletes rank in the top-30 of the World Triathlon Individual Olympic Qualification Rankings by the end the World Triathlon Olympic qualification window on June 14, 2021. Based on rankings as of June 14, the U.S. will qualify three women’s spots and two men’s spots for Tokyo.

USA Triathlon designated two Auto-Selection Events for the U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team, in which athletes had the opportunity to auto-qualify for Tokyo by meeting specific criteria. The two Auto-Selection events were the 2019 ITU World Olympic Qualification Event on Aug. 4, 2019, and the 2021 World Triathlon Championship Series Yokohama on May 15. Summer Rappaport (Thornton, Colo.) became the first woman to qualify for the U.S. Olympic Team with a fifth-place finish at the 2019 Tokyo event. Taylor Knibb (Washington, D.C.) joined Rappaport on the women’s roster by way of her victory May 15 in Yokohama, Japan, while Morgan Pearson (Boulder, Colo.) claimed the first spot on the men’s team thanks to a bronze-medal performance in Yokohama.

All remaining spots on the 2020 U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team, including at least one male and one female, will be named via discretion by USA Triathlon’s Games Athlete Selection Committee. For a complete explanation of U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team qualifying, click here

Rappaport, Knibb and Pearson will participate in the June 16 Facebook Live and media availabilities, along with all athletes who will be newly named to the team on Wednesday.

U.S. OLYMPIC TRIATHLON TEAM ANNOUNCEMENT TIMELINE 
Wednesday, June 16 (All Times MST)

  • 9 a.m. — Team Roster Announced via Press Release, USA Triathlon Social Channels
  • 10 a.m. — Facebook Live on USA Triathlon’s Facebook Page, featuring:
              o Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO
              o John Farra, USA Triathlon High Performance General Manager
              o Dedra DeLilli, Toyota Motor North America
              o All U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team Members
  • 10:30 a.m. — Media Availability, Women’s Team (click here to RSVP)
  • 11 a.m. — Media Availability, Men’s Team (click here to RSVP)

USA Triathlon will provide photos and video of all U.S. Olympic Triathlon Team members to media upon request. To request photo and video, or to schedule interviews outside of the June 16 media availability, contact Caryn Maconi, USA Triathlon Marketing & Public Relations Senior Manager, at caryn.maconi@usatriathlon.org or 443-534-5954. 

To learn more about USA Triathlon at the Olympic Games, visit usatriathlon.org/tokyo2020. USA Triathlon’s Tokyo 2020 Media and Fan Guide will be produced and distributed in the coming weeks.

The Olympic men’s triathlon competition is scheduled for Sunday, July 25, at 5:30 p.m. ET (Monday, July 26 at 6:30 a.m. Tokyo time). The Olympic women’s event is set for Monday, July 26, at 5:30 p.m. ET (Tuesday, July 27 at 6:30 a.m. Tokyo time). The Mixed Relay, which debuts for the first time as an Olympic medal event, is set for Friday, July 30, at 6:30 p.m. ET (Saturday, July 31 at 7:30 a.m. Tokyo time). 

About Tokyo United
USA Triathlon is promoting its elite athletes in the lead-up to, during and beyond the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games with its Tokyo United campaign. Tokyo United showcases the resilience, determination and teamwork shown by U.S. Olympians and Paralympians, and the communities surrounding them, on their path to the Games. Tokyo United also refers to the common experience shared by the USA Triathlon family over the last year — from amateur athletes, race directors, coaches and clubs whose racing plans were upended, to U.S. Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls whose dreams were deferred — and the many ways we lifted each other up in hopes of a more promising 2021.

The three-phased campaign begins with United to Tokyo, showcasing each U.S. Olympic and Paralympic triathlon hopeful’s journey from childhood to the biggest stage in sport — along with the family and support systems that helped them along the way. The second phase, United in Tokyo, brings together the entire multisport community and the global Olympic and Paralympic family to support Team USA at the pinnacle of competition, and to revel in the long-awaited Olympic and Paralympic moment. The final phase, United Beyond Tokyo, will celebrate the achievements of the 2020 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Teams before passing the torch to aspiring triathletes with Olympic and Paralympic dreams for the Paris 2024 and Los Angeles 2028 Games.

About USA Triathlon
USA Triathlon is proud to serve as the National Governing Body for triathlon, as well as duathlon, aquathlon, aquabike, winter triathlon, off-road triathlon and paratriathlon in the United States. Founded in 1982, USA Triathlon sanctions more than 4,000 events and connects with more than 400,000 members each year, making it the largest multisport organization in the world. In addition to its work at the grassroots level with athletes, coaches, and race directors — as well as the USA Triathlon Foundation — USA Triathlon provides leadership and support to elite athletes competing at international events, including World Triathlon Championships, Pan American Games and the Olympic and Paralympic Games. USA Triathlon is a proud member of World Triathlon and the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC).

USA Triathlon Announces Additional Safe Return to Multisport Resources

From USA Triathlon

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced additional resources as part of its Safe Return to Multisport initiative, a comprehensive and multi-pronged set of racing, training and event production guidelines for the multisport community to rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic. The new resources include Guidelines for COVID-19 Contact Tracing, Guidelines for Volunteers, and a Safe Return to Racing Town Hall open to the public this Wednesday, April 7.

“USA Triathlon collaborated with world-class medical experts and leaders at all levels of the sport to develop useful resources to empower our community to get back to racing safely,” said Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. “Many towns and venues across the U.S. approved USA Triathlon-sanctioned races as the first events to be held during the pandemic. This was due in large part to the stringent safety protocols our race directors were ready to present to local authorities, as well as the outdoor and physically distanced nature of the sport itself. USA Triathlon sanctioned hundreds of races across the U.S. in the last year, and there have been no confirmed COVID-19 cases among our participants associated with those events.”

About Safe Return to Multisport
The Safe Return to Multisport initiative was first launched in May 2020 and has been continually updated and expanded as circumstances change. It is developed in coordination with experienced race directors, medical experts, certified coaches, club directors, officials, athletes and endurance sport leaders. It is based on recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization and Occupational Safety and Health Administration, as well as sport-specific guidelines from the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee and World Triathlon. The resources are meant to be used in conjunction with federal, state and local protocols — including mass gathering thresholds and physical distancing requirements.

Safe Return to Racing Town Hall — Wednesday, April 7
USA Triathlon and Triathlete will co-host a Safe Return to Racing Town Hall on Wednesday, April 7, at 7 p.m. ET, designed to help athletes of all levels plan their return to racing in 2021. The virtual discussion is free and open to the public, and will be livestreamed on USA Triathlon’s Facebook page. It will provide an overview of USA Triathlon’s Safe Return to Multisport guidelines and will feature industry professionals covering various topics — from getting back to training safely while managing expectations, to travel suggestions and what athletes should expect on race day. For more details, click here.

Contact Tracing and Volunteer Guidelines

The new resource Guidelines for COVID-19 Contact Tracing, primarily intended for race directors, outlines the actions that should be taken when a COVID-19 infection is identified among an athlete, spectator, official, volunteer or staff member at an event. This includes a step-by-step process for identifying and notifying close contacts, as well as a review of CDC-recommended quarantine, testing and isolation procedures.  

The Guidelines for Volunteers document is provided as a resource for individuals who volunteer at multisport events. This includes a self-screening checklist, a review best practices to mitigate exposure and spread COVID-19, and a set of do’s and don’ts for volunteer participation. Volunteers are vital to the execution and implementation of multisport events. To learn more about local and national volunteer opportunities, click here.

Additional Resources
In addition to the Volunteer Guidelines and Contact Tracing documents, resources also include a Safe Return to Multisport overview; Return to Racing Recommendations for Athletes; Return to Racing Recommendations for Race Directors; Return to Racing Guidelines for Officiating; Recommendations for Organized Mass Gatherings; a Return to Racing Training Program; and Travel Like a Pro, a set of best practices for athletes traveling to events nationally and internationally. All resources are available for download at usatriathlon.org/safe-return.

USA Triathlon continues to monitor the situation surrounding COVID-19, while following the guidance of local authorities, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO), when making decisions regarding the status of USA Triathlon events and programs.

About USA Triathlon
USA Triathlon is proud to serve as the National Governing Body for triathlon, as well as duathlon, aquathlon, aquabike, winter triathlon, off-road triathlon and paratriathlon in the United States. Founded in 1982, USA Triathlon sanctions more than 4,000 events and connects with more than 400,000 members each year, making it the largest multisport organization in the world. In addition to its work at the grassroots level with athletes, coaches, and race directors — as well as the USA Triathlon Foundation — USA Triathlon provides leadership and support to elite athletes competing at international events, including World Triathlon Championships, Pan American Games and the Olympic and Paralympic Games. USA Triathlon is a proud member of World Triathlon and the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC).

USA Duathlon Virtual Run-Bike-Run, presented by RaceX, to benefit USA Triathlon Foundation’s General Fund

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced the opening of registration for the second annual USA Duathlon Virtual Run-Bike-Run presented by RaceX, a virtual multisport challenge set for April 15-May 3. 

The event is free to enter. Participants have the option to make a $35 donation to the USA Triathlon Foundation and receive a finisher’s medal, or a $55 donation to receive a finishers’ medal and a USA Triathlon-branded premium wall-mounted medal hanger. All donations will go to the USA Triathlon Foundation’s general fund to help open pathways for all to swim, bike and run.

The 19-day challenge offers beginner and experienced athletes alike the opportunity to test themselves at the start of the racing season — whether they plan to return to in-person racing in 2021 or tackle their first-ever multisport event. Athletes can complete the challenge on their own time and at their own pace, from anywhere in the world. Registration is open now, and athletes can sign up at any point until the conclusion of the challenge on May 3. Click here to register.

The Virtual Run-Bike-Run is a cumulative challenge, and participants can track their progress on the FitRankings platform using run and bike leaderboards sortable by total mileage, time and elevation gain. Athletes will receive messages from USA Triathlon and FitRankings as they hit overall running and cycling milestones toward traditional duathlon distances: sprint (7.5-kilometer run and 20-kilometer bike) and standard (15k run, 40k bike). 

The virtual event also serves as a precursor to the USA Triathlon Duathlon National Championships, a weekend of in-person racing set for May 22-23 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. As athletes complete the cumulative distances in the Virtual Run-Bike-Run, their progress will be displayed on a map of the Duathlon Nationals standard-distance race course in Tuscaloosa. For more information about Duathlon Nationals, which does not require qualification and which will adhere to USA Triathlon’s Safe Return to Multisport guidelines, click here.

“While multisport athletes across the U.S. will be able to race in-person this year, 2020 revealed the importance of virtual racing in helping attract new athletes to our sport,” said Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. “The USA Duathlon Virtual Run-Bike-Run presented by RaceX enables athletes to test their racing legs on their own time, from their own backyards, as they gear up for a busy season. We also invite beginners who may have newly discovered or rediscovered the joys of running and cycling in 2020 to dip their toes into multisport racing for the first time with this virtual challenge.”

“The USA Triathlon Foundation spent much of 2020 focused on supporting members of the multisport community who were acutely impacted by COVID-19,” said David Deschenes, USA Triathlon Foundation Executive Director. “As we look ahead to a brighter future, we are proud to be able to continue that community support while focusing on broader programs and initiatives that advance our mission of opening pathways for all to swim, bike and run. We are grateful to those who choose to give back to the sport with a donation to the USA Triathlon Foundation as part of their participation in the USA Duathlon Virtual Run-Bike-Run.” 

Athletes can complete the entire challenge on one day or work toward their cumulative distance goal over multiple days or weeks. Workouts may be uploaded to the Virtual Run-Bike-Run platform, powered by FitRankings, at any time throughout the challenge. Run and bike activities can be synced to the platform automatically via most GPS-enabled fitness devices, smartphone apps and smartwatches — including Wahoo, Garmin, Apple Watch, Fitbit, Misfit, Polar, Suunto, Google Fit, RunKeeper, Apple Health and MapMyFitness. Manual uploads are also available. 

Workouts may be completed outdoors or indoors, while observing all local social distancing and safety guidelines: spin bikes and stationary bikes, bike trainers and treadmills are all acceptable.

The Virtual Run-Bike-Run is presented by RaceX, USA Triathlon’s Official Predictive Analytics Technology Partner. One participant will be selected at random to win a one-year subscription to RaceX PERFORMANCE valued at $228, which provides fully optimized race pacing plans, predictions, what-if analysis, and race-rehearsal tools powered by predictive analytics and AI, as well as athletes’ own genetics and training data. 

TrueForm, a global leader in non-motorized treadmill development and running education, is a supporting partner of the Virtual Run-Bike-Run. The first 100 people to register for the event and select the $55 USA Triathlon Foundation premium finisher’s package will receive a $100 gift card, redeemable at trueformrunner.comCompeed, USA Triathlon’s Exclusive Blister Care Partner, is a contributing partner of the event.

Athletes are encouraged to share their progress with members of the nationwide multisport community as they complete the Virtual Run-Bike-Run, using the hashtag #VirtualRBR on social media. 

To learn more and register today for the USA Duathlon Virtual Run-Bike-Run presented by RaceX, click here.

About USA Triathlon
USA Triathlon is proud to serve as the National Governing Body for triathlon, as well as duathlon, aquathlon, aquabike, winter triathlon, off-road triathlon and paratriathlon in the United States. Founded in 1982, USA Triathlon sanctions more than 4,000 events and connects with more than 400,000 members each year, making it the largest multisport organization in the world. In addition to its work at the grassroots level with athletes, coaches, and race directors — as well as the USA Triathlon Foundation — USA Triathlon provides leadership and support to elite athletes competing at international events, including International Triathlon Union (ITU) World Championships, Pan American Games and the Olympic and Paralympic Games. USA Triathlon is a proud member of the ITU and the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC).

USA TRIATHLON ANNOUNCES 2021 TOYOTA U.S. PARATRIATHLON NATIONAL TEAM ROSTER

From USA Triathlon

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced the 16 members of the 2021 Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon National Team, the group of athletes who will represent the U.S. at the highest levels of elite paratriathlon competition during the 2021 season. 

The talented group, which includes four Paralympic triathlon medalists and six world champions, will compete at World Triathlon Para Cup events, World Triathlon Para Series events and the World Triathlon Para Championships throughout 2021. Select athletes will also represent Team USA at the postponed Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020, which will take place this summer from Aug. 24-Sept. 5. 

“USA Triathlon is proud to honor the 16 paratriathletes who will represent us on the world stage this season,” said Amanda Duke Boulet, USA Triathlon Paralympic Program Director. “The 2021 roster includes both veterans of the sport and relative newcomers, but all have the potential to win medals against fierce international competition. Our athletes have adaptability and resilience at their core, and they are eagerly awaiting the opportunity to qualify and compete at the Tokyo Paralympic Games this summer.”

The Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon National Team is supported by Toyota, USA Triathlon’s Exclusive Mobility & Automotive Partner. Toyota has shown unparalleled commitment to the paratriathlon program, serving as the title partner for the Toyota USA Paratriathlon National Championships and in 2019 combining with the Challenged Athletes Foundation and USA Triathlon to offer the first-ever professional prize purse for the event. Toyota also directly sponsors select Team Toyota paratriathletes.

Read the rest of the entire article, including the complete team roster HERE.

A Weight Lifted: Paratriathlete Hailey Danz Shares Her Coming Out Story

From USA Triathlon
By Hailey Danz

In November, 2020, I did one of the most terrifying things I’ve ever done. In this social media post, I came out as gay.

I think I’ve known I was gay since college, but I fought it for a long time. I already fell into one minority group having lost my leg to cancer, and I guess I didn’t want there to be one more thing to make me different. Even as I began to accept this piece of my identity, I was ambivalent toward the idea of coming out publicly. On the one hand, it felt like something I shouldn’t be obligated to do. While my sexuality is a part of me, it’s certainly not the most significant part. I didn’t want to make a big deal about being gay because in the grand scheme of who I am, it’s not a big deal. 

(It’s my hope that one day people won’t feel like they have to “come out” as we know it, because acceptance of differences in sexuality is the norm. And for the record, I think we’re close to this being the case.)

But the reality is, we’re not there yet. And in our current world, if you’re a gay professional athlete who’s not publicly out, you’re hiding something. 

And let me tell you, hiding a part of yourself is exhausting. The weight of that burden is not unlike the weight of a chronically high training load. When you carry it around long enough, fatigue becomes your baseline, and you stop noticing how much effort you’re using just to stay afloat. You get really good at convincing yourself that everything is fine, ignoring that extra edge of irritability or the racing mind that keeps you up at night. And so you power through, believing you’re doing what’s best, until one day you wake up and realize you can’t possibly spend one more second pedaling your bike … or pretending to be someone you’re not. 

This is where I found myself in November. It had been months in the making, but I was finally able to admit to myself that the weight of hiding was too heavy to continue carrying. I decided I had too much to offer this world, and the energy I was using to filter myself needed to be devoted to greater things.

That was when I decided to share the most difficult — and most liberating — thing I had ever written.

Read the rest of the entire article here

How to be a Youth Triathlete

By Bob Seebohar

The year was 2009. I had an idea to expose kids to the wonderful sport of triathlon but had no idea what type of response I would have. Back then, triathlon wasn’t too popular with kids so I held my breath and hoped for the best. My first triathlon summer camp, under my non-profit Kids that TRI organization, was a huge success with close to 20 kids attending. I taught them some skills and drills related to swim, bike, run and transitions and everyone had such a blast learning about triathlon. But the kids didn’t really “train”.

From elementary to high school, kids progress through different developmental stages. Some professionals utilize the Tanner Stages while others use age as developmental markers. Regardless of what model is used, what is important to understand is that kids are not mini-adults. When you say “triathlon” to most people, they think Ironman. I cannot begin to tell you how many discussions I have had about this with parents.

You see, because kids are kids and the developmental process is both fragile and extremely variable (think growth spurts), it is extremely important to remember that kids should really begin with the basics and not be thrown into a volume based training program. The proper progression for having kids enter triathlon is to first teach them proper mechanics and how to move their body efficiently. After a young athlete seems to have a bit of coordination in proper movement patterns, add skills and drills. These are extremely important and should never be overlooked for racking up the training miles. Basic skills for the swim can include learning different strokes, how to get used to open water swimming, sighting, breathing, and proper technique. For cycling it includes how to be safe on a bike, learning rules of the road, hand signals, verbal communication, bike handling skills, how to get on and off a bike properly, and grabbing a water bottle from the cage. On the run, skills really should focus on good technique first and foremost and can include things like how coordinate the arm swing with the leg movement, cadence drills, forward lean drills, proper posture, and breathing techniques.

Not once did you hear me mention train a certain amount of yards or miles as that should not be the focus for youth just beginning the sport. If they progress to more of a high performance level and have graduated their technique, then, and only then, should volume be a conversation. However, I will mention that it is important to note that as kids grow and their limbs get longer, they have to re-learn many functional movement patterns again so even though they know how to implement sound biomechanical technique that works for their body, it may not be the same as they continue through their developmental process.

Youth, and parents, should be patient during the developmental stages and emphasize form, skills and drills over volume of training. The great news is that most youth triathlon races are naturally shorter in distance, which supports the developmental process in a more positive manner.

If you ask me today, now 11 years coaching youth and juniors, if I would have done anything different, I would say absolutely not. I have never rushed the developmental process with any of my young athletes and am extremely proud of that. As a coach and parent myself, there is always pressure on youth being the “best” but rushing the very sensitive developmental time of their lives with too much training volume may not only hurt their physical, emotional and behavioral development, but it may also lead to injury.

Be patient, enjoy the process and find a good team and coach who shares similar philosophies as the ones I mentioned in this article. Kids are kids and they want to have fun, even at a high level of performance. Don’t rush them into adulthood and certainly don’t treat them like mini-adults.

Bob Seebohar is a Sport Dietitian, Exercise Physiologist, Strength and Conditioning Specialist and one of only a handful of USA Triathlon Level III Elite Coaches in the country. He has been a certified USA Triathlon Coach for 21 years. For more information about Coach Bob’s eNRG Performance Youth and Junior Triathlon team and summer program options, visit www.enrgperformance.com or email him at bob@enrgperformance.com.

Check out this article with a list of youth triathlon camps and races.

Tri Coach Tuesday: 4 Essential Mobility Exercises for Cyclists Over 40


By Danielle Zickl , Bicycling.com

You’re probably already aware of the many benefits strength exercises have on your performance. But there’s another group of exercises that often go overlooked: mobility exercises.

According to Rod Murray, USA Cycling coach and owner of Body4Life Training, mobility exercises are anything that brings a joint (where two bones meet) through its full range of motion, improving your overall posture and flexibility—on and off the bike.

“Doing these types of exercises improves your performance so you can ride better, longer, and more comfortably,” Murray says. “You’re constantly adjusting yourself in the saddle—reaching for your water bottle, turning your neck to see cars—so you want to be able to do things comfortably and pain free.”

And while it’s good to start doing mobility exercises at any age, it’s particularly important for those in their 40s and older to do regularly. That’s because the older you get, the higher your risk of injury becomes. Adding mobility exercises into the mix can help bulletproof your joints and prevent such injuries from occurring.

Complete article and exercises here

Tri Coach Tuesday: Do You Need More Protein?

from Infinit Nutrition

Protein is an essential nutrient that is present in every cell of the body and is critical to supporting athletic training. Protein is responsible for building and maintaining muscles, and is what makes up the enzymes that power all reactions in your body that keep you going.

Proteins are made of amino acids, which are building blocks that help grow and maintain the body’s tissues. Humans are not able to synthesize (or produce internally) certain amino acids, so they need to be consumed through food. The amino acids that need to come from dietary sources are called essential amino acids.1 This inability to produce essential amino acids is why the consumption of an adequate amount of high quality protein is vital for your health, epecially as athletes. 

It is recommended that average adults get a minimum of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day.3 Athletes, on the other hand, should consume higher amounts due to increased needs for muscle repair and training adaptations. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends 1.2 to 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day for athletes, depending on training intensity.4 If you’re not consuming enough protein, your body may be giving you different signs that you need to eat more of it. Some signs that you can look for are decreased muscle growth or strength, getting sick more often, hunger, fatigue, unhealthy hair, skin, and nails, neurological disruptions, and swelling.

1. You can’t seem to build muscle 

Do you feel like you’re not getting the results that you want? You may not be consuming enough protein for muscle growth. When you don’t get enough protein in your diet, your body will start to take it from other sources. Primarily, it will take protein from your muscles. This will cause muscle wasting and decreased strength.2 In order to provide the optimal amount of protein and amino acids to allow your muscles to recover and build, protein intake should be spaced throughout the day and after workouts.4

2. You’re getting sick more often

Are you getting sick more often than you have in the past? You could have a weakened immune system due to lack of protein in your diet. Protein is needed for the creation of antibodies, which are proteins that fight off diseases caused by pathogens that enter the body. Lack of protein can reduce the number of antibodies in your blood which can leave you defenseless to different pathogens.2

Complete Article on Infinit Nuttition HERE

Tri Coach Tuesday: A Case for Zone 1

By Laura Marcoux, D3 Multipsport Coach

Zone 1 is commonly known as the recovery zone. We don’t think of it as a “training zone” like the rest of them. Usually zone 1 is described as “extremely easy”, “embarrassingly easy”, “gentle”, and “slow”. It’s basically one step above sitting on the couch. None of these words make us feel like we’re getting any work done so we tend to avoid zone 1 because it’s typical descriptors devalue its training worth.

In a study from the International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance*, that compared training intensity distribution during the course of an Ironman season, statistically significant performance increases were shown when training time was spent primarily in zone 1, compared to zone 2 and higher. For the purpose of this study, zone 1 corresponds to heart rates below aerobic threshold, and zone 2 corresponds to heart rates at and above aerobic threshold (but below anaerobic threshold), which is the intensity in which an Ironman is primarily performed. The participants that spent the majority of their training time above their aerobic threshold (zone 2), had comparatively slower competition times than those who trained mostly below their aerobic threshold.

Read Laura’s complete article HERE