Tri Coach Tuesday: 4 Essential Mobility Exercises for Cyclists Over 40


By Danielle Zickl , Bicycling.com

You’re probably already aware of the many benefits strength exercises have on your performance. But there’s another group of exercises that often go overlooked: mobility exercises.

According to Rod Murray, USA Cycling coach and owner of Body4Life Training, mobility exercises are anything that brings a joint (where two bones meet) through its full range of motion, improving your overall posture and flexibility—on and off the bike.

“Doing these types of exercises improves your performance so you can ride better, longer, and more comfortably,” Murray says. “You’re constantly adjusting yourself in the saddle—reaching for your water bottle, turning your neck to see cars—so you want to be able to do things comfortably and pain free.”

And while it’s good to start doing mobility exercises at any age, it’s particularly important for those in their 40s and older to do regularly. That’s because the older you get, the higher your risk of injury becomes. Adding mobility exercises into the mix can help bulletproof your joints and prevent such injuries from occurring.

Complete article and exercises here

Tri Coach Tuesday: Do You Need More Protein?

from Infinit Nutrition

Protein is an essential nutrient that is present in every cell of the body and is critical to supporting athletic training. Protein is responsible for building and maintaining muscles, and is what makes up the enzymes that power all reactions in your body that keep you going.

Proteins are made of amino acids, which are building blocks that help grow and maintain the body’s tissues. Humans are not able to synthesize (or produce internally) certain amino acids, so they need to be consumed through food. The amino acids that need to come from dietary sources are called essential amino acids.1 This inability to produce essential amino acids is why the consumption of an adequate amount of high quality protein is vital for your health, epecially as athletes. 

It is recommended that average adults get a minimum of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day.3 Athletes, on the other hand, should consume higher amounts due to increased needs for muscle repair and training adaptations. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends 1.2 to 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day for athletes, depending on training intensity.4 If you’re not consuming enough protein, your body may be giving you different signs that you need to eat more of it. Some signs that you can look for are decreased muscle growth or strength, getting sick more often, hunger, fatigue, unhealthy hair, skin, and nails, neurological disruptions, and swelling.

1. You can’t seem to build muscle 

Do you feel like you’re not getting the results that you want? You may not be consuming enough protein for muscle growth. When you don’t get enough protein in your diet, your body will start to take it from other sources. Primarily, it will take protein from your muscles. This will cause muscle wasting and decreased strength.2 In order to provide the optimal amount of protein and amino acids to allow your muscles to recover and build, protein intake should be spaced throughout the day and after workouts.4

2. You’re getting sick more often

Are you getting sick more often than you have in the past? You could have a weakened immune system due to lack of protein in your diet. Protein is needed for the creation of antibodies, which are proteins that fight off diseases caused by pathogens that enter the body. Lack of protein can reduce the number of antibodies in your blood which can leave you defenseless to different pathogens.2

Complete Article on Infinit Nuttition HERE

Tri Coach Tuesday: A Case for Zone 1

By Laura Marcoux, D3 Multipsport Coach

Zone 1 is commonly known as the recovery zone. We don’t think of it as a “training zone” like the rest of them. Usually zone 1 is described as “extremely easy”, “embarrassingly easy”, “gentle”, and “slow”. It’s basically one step above sitting on the couch. None of these words make us feel like we’re getting any work done so we tend to avoid zone 1 because it’s typical descriptors devalue its training worth.

In a study from the International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance*, that compared training intensity distribution during the course of an Ironman season, statistically significant performance increases were shown when training time was spent primarily in zone 1, compared to zone 2 and higher. For the purpose of this study, zone 1 corresponds to heart rates below aerobic threshold, and zone 2 corresponds to heart rates at and above aerobic threshold (but below anaerobic threshold), which is the intensity in which an Ironman is primarily performed. The participants that spent the majority of their training time above their aerobic threshold (zone 2), had comparatively slower competition times than those who trained mostly below their aerobic threshold.

Read Laura’s complete article HERE

 

CELEBRATE 40 YEARS OF DREAMS 2018 IRONMAN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP ON NBC NOVEMBER 24 AT 4:30 P.M. ET

CELEBRATE 40 YEARS OF DREAMS BY TUNING INTO 2018 IRONMAN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP BROUGHT TO YOU BY AMAZON BROADCAST SPECIAL AIRING ON NBC NOVEMBER 24 AT 4:30 P.M. EST

  • Annual NBC broadcast special returns to spotlight historic victories and the magic of Kona through the Champions and Inspirational Athletes who compete
  • Five-episode broadcast of “IRONMAN: Quest for Kona” to air on November 23 starting at 11:30 a.m. ET on NBCSN following 10 athletes as they attempt to qualify for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon

TAMPA, Fla. (November 21, 2018) – The annual broadcast special of the IRONMAN® World Championship brought to you by Amazon will air this Saturday, November 24 at 4:30 p.m. ET on NBC, chronicling the iconic triathlon that took place on October 13, 2018 in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i. Since 1978, the IRONMAN World Championship triathlon has showcased not only the limitless physical capability and competitive nature of the top endurance athletes in the world, but also some of the most awe-inspiring and impactful stories of courage and resilience from the age-group athletes and everyday individuals competing alongside them.

Producing this year’s 90-minute show is Amaury Sport Organisation (A.S.O.), a best-in-class television production company that is highly experienced in coverage of endurance sports events such as the Tour de France to audiences around the world. The broadcast includes more camera angles than ever before and aerial imagery that will put viewers into the heart of the race, showcasing the amazing beauty and grueling conditions that the island of Hawai`i is known for.

Click on the following link for a preview of this year’s broadcast: https://youtu.be/moVDY_8NWtE

The broadcast special spans from the pre-race build-up beginning with body marking to the final hours of the nighttime finish, unveiling the intensity, emotion, physical demands and dramatic competition of the 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and 26.2-mile run across the rugged Hawaiian terrain. With approximately 2,500 registered athletes, the 40th Anniversary year marked the largest field ever with athletes from a record breaking 82 countries, regions and territories, proving that ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE®.

Among the features of this year’s IRONMAN World Championship special:

  • Exclusive interviews from current and former World Champions and other professional IRONMAN® athletes during a record setting day.
  • Defending women’s IRONMAN World Champion Daniela Ryf of Switzerland looks to make history and join an elite group by claiming a fourth consecutive victory as 2017’s second-place finisher Lucy Charles of Great Britain looks to top the podium. Germany’s Anne Haug looks to make a name for herself at this years event.
  • With a perfect display of form and strength, course record holder and last year’s champion Patrick Lange of Germany battles the likes of Belgium’s Bart Aernouts, Great Britain’s David McNamee and American Tim O’Donnell.
  • Mother of five, lawyer, entrepreneur and cancer survivor, Rachel Brenke takes on the ultimate test while redefining what it means to be a modern-day superwoman.
  • Leigh Chivers, who has suffered great personal tragedy following the loss of his wife and young son, looks to honor them while competing at the IRONMAN World Championship
  • Brothers Brent and Kyle Pease motivated by the Hoyts are the epitome of ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE. Born with cerebral palsy, Kyle turned to his brother Brent to help him complete his dream of becoming an athlete. At the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon, they attempt to become only the second special team in history to complete the course.

Kyle Coon Continues to Excel

Kyle Coon has had quite a 2018 season.

In October he won the Silver medal and the ITU Paratriathlon World Cup Race.

Article here

 

In November he was named as one of three Parathletes to be added to the USA Resident Team at the Colorado Springs OTC.

Article here

 

And, just this past weekend, Kyle and guide Alan Greening, finish IMAZ in under 11 hours!

Video from 12news.com in Phoenix, AZ  here

 

 

 

Local Professional, Cam Dye, Announces Retirement

THE END OF A DREAM CAREER

I was 15-years-old when I entered my first race.

On that day the swim was in a pool, so it felt fitting when I ended my career with a pool-swim at Major League Triathlon in Charlotte on October 6, 2018. For a long time, I’ve made a living by pushing the pace and playing to my strengths.

Now, at the age of 34, I walk away satisfied with how I went about my business: honest, dedicated, and collegial.

We all know that it takes a particular personality to put your whole life into sports; it’s usually the kind of competitor who gets mad when they lose at Candyland. Guilty as charged. As a racer, my goal was always to see if my best was better than your best. Some days it was, other days it wasn’t. On the days that it wasn’t, I am proud to say that I raced against some of the greatest to ever toe the line.

Here’s to you Alistair and Javier, Crowie and Macca. And then there was Greg Bennett who had an uncanny ability to show up on the biggest stages and knock it out of the park.

You all were an inspiration to me. 

Original and complete post here

Monday Masters: Swimming May Slow Down Aging By Decades

by Diane Sewell, Everything Zoomer

 

From cradle to grave, swimming might just be the best exercise ever. Here, eight health benefits of taking a lap or two. 

Swimming is good for just about everyone. It accommodates all ages, stages, abilities and disabilities.

There’s also evidence it can slow down the aging process.

A long-term study at Indiana University Bloomington’s Counsilman Center for the Science of Swimming found that Masters Swimmers (over age 35) who swam roughly 3,200 to 4,500 metres (about 3.2 to 4.8 kilometres) three to five times a week, postponed the aging process. And not just for a few years but for decades, according to traditional age markers like muscle mass blood pressure and lung function.

But you don’t have to be a Masters Swimmer to benefit from swimming. Far from it.

“The health and well-being benefits start with a minimal amount of swimming,” Counsilman Centre Director Joel Stager is quoted as saying in the university’s newsletter. “If you want the fitness effect, you’ll need to look at getting your heart rate up and boosting the intensity.”

Another study, by Dr. Steven Blair at the University of South Carolina, has shown swimming dramatically reduces the risk of dying. The study spanned 32 years and followed 40,000 men, aged 20 to 90. Those who swam had a 50 per cent lower death rate than runners, walkers and those who didn’t exercise at all.

Here are some other known benefits to swimming:

1. It’s kind to your joints and improves flexibility.

 

Original article here

XTERRA 2018 World Championships, What a Day

October 28, 2018 (Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii) – Rom Akerson from Costa Rica and Lesley Paterson from Scotland captured the 23rd annual XTERRA World Championship off-road triathlon elite titles on a sunny but muddy day in Kapalua, Maui.

It’s the first XTERRA World title for Akerson and the third for Paterson, who last won in 2011 and 2012. Both earned $20,000 for their respective victories, their share of the $100,000 elite purse.

 

More than 700 endurance athletes from 44 countries and 39 U.S. states competed in the event, which started with a one-mile rough water swim at D.T. Fleming Beach, continued with a muddy 18.5-mile mountain bike ride that traversed the West Maui Mountains, and finished with a 6.5-mile trail run through forest trails and beach sand.

There was more than 4,000 feet of combined climbing on the technical bike and run courses, which were muddy and slippery due to recent rainstorms on Maui’s northwest coast.

 

On a very difficult and muddy course Colorado athletes made a great showing.

Josiah Middaugh of Vail, rounded out the Pro Men’s race with a 5th place finish and the only American in the top 10.

In the Pro Women’s race, Americans Suzie Snyder, Julie Baker and Allison Baca, of Boulder, all finished in the top 10.

Deanna McCurdy of Littleton and Sharon McDowell-Larsen or Colorado Springs topped the podium in their Age Groups.

 

Full Recap and results here