Are you an IRON-nerd? You could win BIG – Premier IRONMAN event in NYC!

Are you an IRON-NERD?

Tell us how much you love IRONMAN, how it’s changed your life for the better, or any other story how IRONMAN came into your life.

The judging committee at 303Triathlon will choose the best entry and the winner will receive two (2) tickets to the IRONMAN World Championship Broadcast Premiere Viewing Party in New York City (travel and lodging NOT INCLUDED) on Tuesday, December 5th.

Prize valued at $300, the winner and their guest will get to attend the Broadcast Premiere and rub shoulders with Pro-Athletes Patrick Lange, Timothy O’Donnell, the “Voice of IRONMAN” Mike Reilly, and many more IRONMAN celebrities.

Please submit your entries to khem@303colorado.com by November 22 nd . Winning entry will be published at 303Triathlon.com on Tuesday, November 28th.

Good luck!!!

IRONMAN World Championships Broadcast Premier Viewing Party in NYC!

Having Kona withdrawals? Here’s a very good reason to book a trip…a trip to the Big Apple!

The Broadcast Premiere Viewing Party of the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship will be taking place on December 5th in New York City. Besides a front row seat at the finish line in Kona, this party is slated to be the Best Night in Triathlon.

The evening will begin with a welcome reception mix & mingle with professional athletes, featured inspirational athletes, and an opportunity to take a piece of IRONMAN World Championship history home with you via a silent auction. There will even be an opportunity to bid on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to race in the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship and 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship during the live auction!

Following the reception, you will experience all the action of the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship NBC broadcast before it airs nationwide. The evening concludes with a Q&A session discussing all the behind-the-scenes details with a panel of IRONMAN Professional Athletes and IRONMAN Hall of Fame members.

Celebrity guests to include 3-time IRONMAN World Champion Mirinda Carfrae, IRONMAN U.S. Champion Timothy O’Donnell, and of course The “Voice” of IRONMAN Mike Reilly.

Tickets are on sale now with proceeds benefitting the IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund. Click here to purchase tickets.

For the Data-Hungry: 2017 IRONMAN® World Championship Interactive Quarq Qollector Pacing Analysis

From Training Peaks

The tape has long been broken, the champagne sprayed and champions crowned at the 2017 IRONMAN® World Championship, but for the first time we have in-depth access to data that paints a new and dynamic picture of the day.

What we saw on the live broadcast on October 14 didn’t fully capture the strategies and pacing that played out on course on a day that resulted in a new course record and several new names making the podium for the first time in both the women’s and men’s professional races.

With the help of the Quarq and their Quarq Qollector, IRONMAN’s® Live Pro Race Tracking Partner, we were able to analyze real-time data, which we shared for various athletes live during the race through the IRONMAN® Live Blog. Additionally, we were able to study comparative data after the race, giving us valuable new insight into the pacing throughout the bike and the run for the top athletes in both the women’s and men’s races.

We recently wrote about the power and pacing of Lionel Sanders during this year’s race. The Canadian pro cracked a major piece of the Kona puzzle on his third attempt by finishing second after being passed by eventual champion Patrick Lange at mile 23. Using the Qollector, we can put his effort into the larger comparative context and see how the fast pace of the bike played out favorably for strong runner Lange, but cost other top pros like Sebastian Kienle the top spot.

On the women’s side, the data shows that despite being the heavy pre-race favorite, it was no cake walk for Daniela Ryf on her way to her third straight victory. We can see that she was fighting hard to stave off the hard-charging dark horse Lucy Charles for much of the bike and the run.

Before we dive into the data for the men’s and women’s pro races, take a look at the interactive tool Quarq has graciously set up for everyone to use to compare pro athletes’ paces throughout the race….

Read the full article and complete analysis

303Radio: Colorado’s Smokin’ Fast Tim Hola

303Radio caught up with smoking fast Tim Hola at the King Kamehameha Kona Beach hotel. Humble as always, but with 15 years of experience racing here, we know he is going to crush it on Saturday at the Ironman World Championship. Good luck Tim! Make Colorado proud!!

Dave Scott’s Perfect IRONMAN World Championship Taper

From TrainingPeaks

By Dave Scott

Over the years I’ve seen many athletes not achieve their full potential in races because they failed to execute a proper IRONMAN taper.

I’ve witnessed triathletes who have not backed off enough and were tired and flat at the event; I’ve also seen those who have dialed back their training far too much, and dulled the fitness that they had taken months to hone.

Follow my prescription as we countdown to race day in Kona, and you’ll arrive at the starting line with that perfect mix of expansive aerobic capability and sharp, high-intensity output that will propel you to an optimal performance.

While this is written with the IRONMAN World Championship in mind, it will work for any IRONMAN you may be racing. Tapering is an art form, so above all else, listen to your own body.

22 Days to 10 Days Before The Race

1. Maintain your schedule. Maintain the same number of training days per week and follow your typical schedule. If you normally run on Tuesdays, then continue to do it! Don’t alter things.

2. Long training days. Your training is nearly complete, and so you should resist “cramming in” your final long workouts too close to the event. If you’re planning a long run, schedule your last one 18 to 22 days before the race. Your last long bike should take place 14 to 21 days from race day. Your long swim: Nine to 10 days prior.

3. Maintain “race-like intensity,” but reduce the segment length of repeats. There is a great physiological return on reducing your sub-threshold and threshold training to between 90 second to 3.5 minutes per repeat.

These shorter segments—even with complete recovery—will not leave you whipped after the workout. By resisting the temptation to lengthen the repeats, you’ll maintain the adaptive stress of the session and enhance your day-to-day recovery.

An example set is: 3 x 3.5 min + 3 x 90 sec + 3 x 2.5 min + 3 x 90 sec. The rest interval between repeats should be long enough to maintain the desired intensity throughout the workout.

4. Notice improved performance. One characteristic of a proper taper is that you’ll begin to feel a bit fresher during and after the workouts, while experiencing a 2 percent to 5 percent increase in performance (either by comparing tangible measurements or Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE)).

For example, all of your training sessions might feel easier with a concurrent increase in speed, watts or simultaneous reduction in heart rate.

Simply, you should begin to feel like you’re flowing at less effort. This sensation is a positive affirmation that your training has been effective and you’re on track for a good race.

Additionally, niggling stiffness or sore spots should subside. Acute soreness means you need to rest more or consider a combination of modalities to expedite the recovery (see #8 below).

5. Reduce overall training time. A reduction in total training time should start during this taper block. Looking at weekly training volumes, my suggestion is not to reduce the volumes by a fixed percentage.

The problem with this math is that the athletes who train 11 to 14 hours per week (i.e. most age-group athletes with full-time jobs and families) cannot compare themselves with those training 30-35 hours weekly (i.e. professional athletes and elite age group athletes).

The following are my percentage reductions based on your hours per week:

  • For those logging 11 to 14 hours per week, reduce your volume by about 15 percent.
  • If you’re typically training 15 to 22 hours, bring the volume down by 20 percent.
  • If you’re at 23 to 30 hours, then reduce that by 25 percent.
  • If you’re training more than 30 hours, then reduce that by 30 percent.

These percentage reductions should be reflected in all disciplines, and particularly in your run workouts. The eccentric load of the run slows the recovery process. Also be sure to look at your personal strengths and weaknesses and reduce accordingly.

6. Maintain your mobility, stretching and strength training. Eliminate the heavy lifts or explosive plyometrics, and reduce the weight and number of reps, but maintain your typical routine.

Take the exercises to fatigue but never to failure. If you’re on a minimal strength program, continue at least twice per week emphasizing core, gluteal, rotator and back strength, plus maintain joint mobility with foam rolling and stretching.

7. Watch your weight. Your goal is to neither gain weight nor hit your optimum race weight during this time block.

Eat nutrient-dense foods with healthy fats and protein at all meals. Cut back on simple carbohydrates.

Don’t alter your macronutrient balance. This is not the time to adjust your diet strategy! If you’re madly driven to lose weight during the final 10 days, then keep this weight loss to no more 0.5 percent of your body weight.

8. Continue your bodywork. Maintain treatments with your physical therapist, massage therapist, acupuncturist or yoga routines. These are all good, but don’t try something new during this period!

Nine Days and Counting to Race Day….

Click here to read the rest of the article, including final taper and race day nerves strategy

IRONMAN Boulder champion Timothy O’Donnell talks with 303Radio: Fatherhood, Kona Strategy

Brought to you by Training Peaks:

Hear 2017 Ironman Boulder champion Timothy O’Donnell tell 303radio hosts Bill Plock and Rich Soares talk about being a father and preparing to race and how his 2017 season played out. Timothy shares how his Santa Cruz 70.3 race went and just life as a pro triathlete, being married to Mirinda Carfrae the motivation that comes from a family and some ideas on how he is gonna attack Kona in 2017 with the help of Mark Allen and Greg Bennett both of Boulder and using the Halo NeuroSport. Road to Kona through Boulder!

Most likeable guy in triathlon? Longmont’s Tyler Butterfield talks with 303Radio about KONA

303Radio‘s Bill Plock interviewed Tyler Butterfield – one of the most likeable guys in pro triathlon. From his youth in Bermuda to his new hobby farm in Longmont, the guy is nothing but friendly from all angles. He has huge respect for his fellow competitors, is humble in his accomplishments, entirely devoted to his family, grateful to his parents and sponsors, and remembers every name his 6-year-old daughter gave to their herd of adorable pet goats (with a seemingly princess theme)… Headed to #Kona, he just might land on the podium again. We’ll be watching and cheering for sure.  (Photo by Bill Plock)

 

303Radio Interviews Chris McDonald of Big Sexy Racing – headed to Kona for the 8th time

By Rich Soares

Chris McDonald of Big Sexy Racing is heading to the Ironman World Championship in Kailua Kona for the 8th time this year.

I had a chance to talk with Chris and Brandt Beal about the partnership between Big Sexy Racing and Indur, a results-based health system that launched earlier this year.

“Indur is a wellness from the inside-out platform,” as Brandt explains. Indur analyzes a comprehensive blood panel and then uses their proprietary robust analytical tool to provide customized advice and give individuals customized plans for improving their health. “For athletes, we’re looking to optimize the performance that they can get out of their body.”

Indur tests give athletes insights into how to improve their metabolism, boost energy, sleep better, build muscle and more. Indur helps individuals transform themselves from a health perspective and the partnership with Chris “really made sense for us at Indur.”

Prior to becoming a professional triathlete, Chris explains, “I was a 260-pound construction working in New Zealand eating pies and sausage rolls.” Inspired by his brother, Chris jumped into triathlon and was encouraged by the transformation that took place over the course of six Ironman races as an amateur.

Now as a professional Chris’outlook has evolved. “Performance is something that I depend on for my livelihood. I’m looking for a 1% advantage over my competition. if I can get a ¼ % edge on my electrolytes, sleep and recovery, it all adds up.”

With his Indur partnership in place, Chris heads to Kona with confidence that his body is dialed in. “This year’s approach to Kona is about keeping normality as close to the race as possible.” He’s learned over time how to acclimate to the heat with specific heat protocols while living and training in Colorado.

Go Big Sexy!

Rich Soares, 303Triathlon

303Radio Talks with Tim Hola before Ironman 70.3 World Championships

303Triathlon recently caught up with Tim Hola before he headed to Chattanooga Tennessee for this past weekend’s Ironman 70.3 World Championship.

Tim lives in Highlands Ranch with his wife Nicole and two children, Connor and Spencer. Triathlon has been in the Hola family since his dad, Ken Hola, introduced Tim to it at age 20. Tim has always been competitive and he believes the height of one’s achievement is a product of the height of one’s goals. Tim talked about his goals for this season and the results that led to a USAT National Championship and qualifying for both the 70.3 and Ironman World Championships.

Tim cranked out a 4:38:23 finish at 70.3 World Championship in Chattanooga this weekend and will now set his sights on Kona in mid-October. This will be Tim’s 16th Ironman on the big island of Hawaii, showing he has the formula for training and competing at the highest level, while balancing work and family.

Tim competes at near-pro level, yet he is a working age-grouper facing the responsibilities and prioritization challenges of those who do triathlon for the passion and not for the paycheck. He gives us insights into how balancing his passion for triathlon with other priorities of a working age grouper and father. When it comes to balance, Tim describes the importance of “knowing your priorities, meeting your partner’s needs and communicating”.

Check out the complete interview.

Butterfield’s Orderly Results: Tyler Scores Another Step Up At Ironman 70.3 Worlds

September 12, 2017 – Professional triathlete Tyler Butterfield logged another world-class performance to score seventh place at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship on Sunday in Chattanooga, Tennessee, his best 70.3 World Championship finish to date. The result marked Butterfield’s steady progression through the top ten at the championship event, having finished ninth in 2013,, eighth in 2015, and now seventh in 2017, and bodes well for his fitness in the final five-week lead into the Ironman World Championship on October 14th in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. His corresponding Kona finishes in those years were his best to date—seventh in 2013 and fifth in 2015—showing a pattern of success when tackling the 70.3 Championship prior to the Ironman World Championship, his primary focus for several years now.

Butterfield clocked 25:20 in the 1.2-mile swim, emerging with the main group of men containing all the key contenders outside of swim leaders Ben Kanute, the eventual second- place finisher, and Javier Gomez, prolific triathlon champion and silver medalist at the Olympic Games, who went on to win.

Ten men—including Butterfield and Ironman world record holder Tim Don—rode in the chase pack, with hard-charging Sebastian Kienle, a two-time victor at the race, coming from behind. Entering T2, Butterfield was in third; within 30 seconds a flurry of six other top rivals flew in and out of transition and quickly sorted themselves out on the road ahead, with Butterfield now running in sixth. Gomez, known for his spectacular run speed, made quick work from further back in the field to knock off every forward challenger and claim the world title. Butterfield held steady and strong, and ultimately crossed the line in seventh with a 1:17:32 half marathon and 3:56:22 finish time.

“I wasn’t able to put in my usual attacks on the bike. It was hard enough just being there! Racing at this level gets more and more competitive every year. I looked around and everyone in the group was a world title holder, world record holder, or at least someone who has won a lot of races. You can’t just get away from these guys whenever you like,” said Butterfield.

“I also wanted to wait and test my run,” he continued. “I wanted to really get a feel for my run fitness in advance of Kona—something you can’t fully gauge outside of a race environment. I haven’t had the opportunity to get in the run training I’d like for a number of years—partly because of injury, but now, looking back, also because of where we lived.”

For more information please visit Butterfieldracing.com

Since the family’s move from their mountain home to a farm in rural Boulder County, Butterfield has been able to run straight out the door, rather than spend time driving to and from town. Living at a lower altitude (5,600 feet, as opposed to 7,400 feet) has also allowed him to cope with a higher workload. Additionally, he has found that the convenience of being able to go home between sessions has helped his recovery.

“I was a little disappointed with my run, considering the training I’ve had. It was solid, but nothing special. Really, I should be running only a little slower than that for an entire marathon if I want to be in the mix in Kona,” said Butterfield, who averaged 5:55 minute miles in Sunday’s race. “I’m not sure if I was still a little tired from the training. I certainly gave this race the respect it deserves and came in tapered, but I think I may have carried in a bit too much long-term fatigue. I’m hoping I can get in the remaining training I need in the next five weeks, as well as shake some of the residual tiredness from my Kona overload. It’s kind of hard to do both at once—get fitter and fresher—but I’ll try.”

Butterfield indeed appears to be on track for another impressive race on the Big Island, as evidenced by a steady pattern of improving results. His 2017 regular season performances started with fourth at Ironman 70.3 Dubai, then third at the Ironman North American Championship, followed by second at Ironman 70.3 Monterrey, and finally a win at Ironman 70.3 Raleigh. This pattern of improvement also shows in his Ironman 70.3 World Championship progression—ninth in 2013, eighth in 2015, and seventh in 2017—and in his Kona performances, where he finished seventh in 2013 and fifth in 2015.

“I guess I like to keep my results orderly,” joked Butterfield. “In all seriousness, I do like the steady progress upward. It’s rewarding to see the results of all the hard work, as my entire family sacrifices year-round to help me be the best I can be. Hopefully with the focused training I’ve had so far and the time remaining, I can continue to improve all the way into Kona.”

Butterfield now heads back home to Colorado for his final Kona training block, with five short weeks remaining until the Ironman World Championship.