Katie Zaferes placed seventh at WTS Abu Dhabi in 2017. ITU Media/Janos M. Schmidt.

From USA Triathlon

World Triathlon Series opener features thrilling sprint-distance course

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Eight American athletes are set to compete in the ITU World Triathlon Series opener in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on Friday, taking on a stacked international field.

The sprint-distance race, which covers a 750-meter swim, 20-kilometer bike and 5-kilometer run, is held on the iconic Yas Island. The course is built for fast and furious racing, with portions of the bike and run taking athletes around the Yas Marina Formula One circuit. The elite men race first at 4:36 a.m. EST (1:36 p.m. local time), and the elite women follow at 6:36 a.m. EST (3:36 p.m. local time). Both races will be broadcast live online at

Five U.S. women will toe the line on Friday, including 2016 U.S. Olympian and 2017 WTS overall bronze medalist Katie Zaferes (Santa Cruz, Calif.). Zaferes had a stellar 2017 season that included two regular-season WTS podiums in Edmonton and Yokohama, in addition to her silver-medal performance at the Rotterdam ITU World Triathlon Grand Final.

Kirsten Kasper (North Andover, Mass.) and Summer Cook (Thornton, Colo.), who finished fourth and 10th respectively in the 2017 WTS rankings, will also look for strong season-opening performances. Kasper earned four top-five finishes on the WTS circuit last year, including a bronze in Yokohama.

Cook was also consistent in 2017, earning a season-best fourth-place finish at ITU World Triathlon Edmonton and placing ninth at the Grand Final in Rotterdam. She and Zaferes are the only two Americans on the start list who have reached the top step of the WTS podium, with Cook winning ITU World Triathlon Edmonton in 2016 and Zaferes taking the win at ITU World Triathlon Hamburg in 2016.

Also set to compete are Taylor Spivey (Redondo Beach, Calif.), who earned her first WTS medal with a silver in Leeds last year, and Chelsea Burns, who cracked the ITU Triathlon World Cup podium for the first time in 2017.

The U.S. women will be up against stiff competition, as 2017 world champion Flora Duffy of Bermuda and 2017 WTS overall silver medalist Ashleigh Gentle of Australia lead the start list. Defending WTS Abu Dhabi champion Andrea Hewitt of New Zealand, Great Britain’s Jessica Learmonth, Canada’s Joanna Brown and the Netherlands’ Rachel Klamer will also be medal threats. Visit for a complete women’s start list.

Representing the U.S. in the men’s race are Kevin McDowell (Phoenix, Ariz.), Ben Kanute (Phoenix, Ariz.) and Tony Smoragiewicz (Rapid City, S.D.). McDowell will look to build on a successful stretch of late-season racing in 2017, which saw him earn podiums at ITU Triathlon World Cup races in Huelva, Spain, and Sarasota-Bradenton, Florida.

Kanute had a strong fall season in non-drafting races, placing second to Spain’s Javier Gomez at the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in September and earning the overall win at the Island House Triathlon in November. He will look to improve upon his 16th-place performance at last year’s WTS Abu Dhabi stop.

Smoragiewicz is making his second career WTS start in Abu Dhabi; in his debut on the circuit last year in Edmonton, he placed 27th. Smoragiewicz was the top U.S. man at the 2017 ITU Under-23 World Championships last September, placing 13th.

The men’s international field is stacked, with 2017 world champion and 2016 WTS Abu Dhabi champion Mario Mola of Spain holding the No. 1 spot. Kristian Blummenfelt of Norway, the 2017 world bronze medalist, and Great Britain’s Jonathan Brownlee, the 2016 Olympic silver medalist, are also both set to compete.

Visit for a complete men’s start list.

ITU World Triathlon Abu Dhabi is the first of eight stops on the regular-season WTS circuit before September’s ITU World Triathlon Grand Final in Gold Coast, Australia.

Boulder’s Nick Noone Chosen as USAT’s Amateur Athlete of the Year

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced its roster of 2017 Age-Group Triathletes of the Year, an award presented annually by Garmin and selected by USA Triathlon’s Age Group Committee.

Nick Noone (Boulder, Colo.) claimed top honors for overall Men’s Age-Group Triathlete of the Year, while Kirsten Sass (McKenzie, Tenn.) earned the title of overall Women’s Age-Group Triathlete of the Year for the third consecutive year and fourth year in total (2013, 2015-2017).

Noone’s 2017 season began with an individual Olympic-distance victory at April’s USA Triathlon Collegiate Club National Championships in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, a performance that helped the University of Colorado to its eighth straight team title. He went on to claim the overall win at IRONMAN Santa Rosa in May, his first foray into the full-IRONMAN distance. In June, Noone claimed the men’s 18-24 age group title and placed ninth overall at IRONMAN 70.3 Victoria.

“With a 2017 season full of highs and lows, this is a humbling award to receive,” Noone said. “Many thanks to USA Triathlon, my family, and my CU Boulder and EMJ teammates.”

Full results at USAT

Triathlete Magazine Makes $100,000 In-Kind Donation to Time to Tri Initiative

Boulder based Outdoor Pocket Media, owners of Triathlete Magazine, VeloNews, Women’s Running, and just announced a huge donation in an effort to support USAT and IRONMAN’s new program “Time to Tri” aimed at getting 100,000 new people into the sport of triathlon. Details of this donation are below.


303’s Bill Plock and Mile High Endurance’s Rich Soares recently interviewed USAT President, Barry Siff, to discuss the program more in depth.  This discussion (podcast) can be heard on Mile High Endurance this Sunday, February 25th, and on 303Radio Friday March 2nd.


Multi-channel advertising donation will reach runners and cyclists to grow triathlon

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Triathlete Magazine announces a $100,000 donation of advertising space to the Time to Tri™ initiative, a new, industry-wide campaign to introduce 100,000 Americans to triathlon by the end of 2020. Pocket Outdoor Media, the publisher of Triathlete Magazine, will donate print, digital and social advertising space across all its leading endurance sports brands, including Triathlete, Women’s Running, and VeloNews, in an effort to bring runners and cyclists into the sport of triathlon.

Time to Tri is a new, industry-wide campaign launched by USA Triathlon and IRONMAN to grow American participation in the sport of triathlon. The campaign will recruit and support athletes as they pursue their first triathlon, one of the most transformative experiences in endurance sports. Time to Tri provides training and racing advice including a free training plan, motivational tools, and other resources through

The site offers editorial content as well as free, customized sprint-distance training plans to athletes who sign up with their email address. Each plan’s workouts were developed by USA Triathlon Certified and IRONMAN U® Certified Coaches and are based on the athlete’s self-selected skill level in the swim, bike, and run. In addition to the digital platform at, USA Triathlon and IRONMAN will also engage in proactive outreach to identify new and aspiring triathletes including single-sport swimmers, cyclists and runners.

“Triathlete’s huge commitment is exactly what we had in mind when we introduced Time to Tri to key industry stakeholders,” said Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. “Our goal is to bring the sport together to grow triathlon, and nothing says that louder than the industry’s leading media brand stepping up to the plate with $100,000 in advertising.”

“As the world’s most read triathlon magazine, Triathlete is uniquely positioned to aid the Time to Tri effort,” said Pocket Outdoor Media CEO Felix Magowan. “Yet it’s the exposure to non-triathletes through, Women’s Running magazine and VeloNews that offers the biggest opportunity to grow the sport. We are delighted to partner with USA Triathlon and IRONMAN in this effort.”

“We are excited about growing participation in the sport of triathlon,” said Chris Stadler, Chief Marketing Officer for IRONMAN. “Our goal is to help potential first-time triathletes overcome their barriers through proper education, and this generous donation provides the perfect platform.”


Previous 303Triathlon post here


Changes include a move from 10 to six Regions, increased communication with National Office

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced a restructuring of its Regions — reducing the number of Regions from 10 to six — to increase efficiency, collaboration and communication with the USA Triathlon National Office. The six Regions moving forward will be: Northeast, Mideast, Southeast, North Central, South Central and West.

Commissions, previously called Regional Councils, are responsible for aiding the development and growth of multisport within the designated states of each Region while acting as a liaison between the USA Triathlon National Office and USA Triathlon race directors, certified coaches, clubs and members.

The new structure will enable Regions to work more closely with USA Triathlon staff at the organization’s Colorado Springs headquarters, and will place a greater emphasis on regional programming that directly supports the 2018 USA Triathlon Strategic Plan.

Regional Representatives, formerly Regional Chairs, will no longer be elected officers. Instead, they will be appointed by USA Triathlon at the recommendation of senior volunteers within each Region.

“USA Triathlon’s Regional Representatives and volunteers are some of our greatest advocates — volunteer leaders advancing our mission at the grassroots level,” said Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. “This restructuring demonstrates our eagerness to work more closely with the regional network, share ideas and best practices, and make the entire multisport community stronger as a result.”

In addition, USA Triathlon is currently hiring three Regional Facilitators, each of which is a newly created, full-time staff position based in Colorado Springs. Each facilitator will serve as a liaison to two USA Triathlon Regions. Each one will also serve as a specialist in one of three key areas for multisport development: youth participation, women’s participation and short-course racing.

The number of USA Triathlon Regional Championship events will be reduced from 10 to six to align with the new regional structure, and six Regional Special Qualifiers will also be added to the calendar. At Regional Championships and Special Qualifiers, the top 33 percent or top-five competitors in each age group — whichever is greater — qualify for the USA Triathlon Olympic-Distance Age Group National Championships. The total number of qualifying athletes at those events will remain consistent with previous years. Regional Championship and Special Qualifier events will be added to each Region’s webpage at as event dates are finalized.

Athletes may also continue to qualify for the Olympic-Distance Age Group National Championships by finishing in the top 10 percent of their age group at any USA Triathlon Sanctioned age-group triathlon. Additional qualification criteria can be found by clicking here.

USA Triathlon is seeking volunteers to help execute and support regional programming. Potential volunteers should enter their contact information in this form, and USA Triathlon will connect each individual with their appropriate region based on state of residence.

Additional details about USA Triathlon Regions — including leadership updates, race calendars and program information — will be added to each Region’s webpage at as they become available.


Forty-four ambassadors selected to help grow multisport participation in their local communities

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced its first-ever Ambassador Program, comprised of 44 multisport athletes who have represented Team USA in international age-group competition. USA Triathlon Ambassadors will provide resources, advice and inspiration to aspiring athletes in their local communities, using their collective stories and experiences to grow multisport participation nationwide.

Ambassadors are tasked with hosting at least three presentations in their communities over the course of the year, which may include school visits, skills clinics and Q&A sessions. These events are meant to introduce prospective and beginner triathletes of all ages to the sport, as well as provide helpful resources for training and racing. Each ambassador will also nominate a support team to help plan the presentations and build interest in the multisport lifestyle.

Of the 44 ambassadors who successfully applied through a comprehensive nationwide selection process, 30 are women and 14 are men. They hail from 20 different states, with California being the most-represented, and range in age from 17 to 87. Ambassadors were selected based on their background in multisport — with the prerequisite of having competed for USA Triathlon’s amateur Team USA — as well as their commitment to the program and innovative ideas for recruiting new participants.

“We are excited to unveil the USA Triathlon Ambassador Program,” said Lauren Rios, USA Triathlon’s Team USA and Research Coordinator. “Our inaugural team of ambassadors is made up of incredibly passionate athletes who have amazing stories to tell. We are confident that this group will inspire the masses to give our sport a try, and support many new triathletes on their journeys to the start line.”

In addition to the presentations, USA Triathlon Ambassadors will also be available on a regular basis to answer training and racing questions via email or social media.

Some ambassadors will focus on specific disciplines of multisport, including triathlon, duathlon, aquathlon or aquabike, while others will focus on topics such as weight loss or mental training.

Read more


Industry-wide effort aims to attract 100,000 new participants to the sport by 2020

TEMPE, Ariz. — IRONMAN and USA Triathlon today announced Time to Tri™, an unprecedented industry-wide initiative to grow the sport of triathlon in the United States by supporting and inspiring beginners to complete their first race. With the end of 2020 as a goal of introducing 100,000 new participants to the sport, Time to Tri provides training and racing advice, motivational tools and other resources at its online hub,

The initiative, a strategic joint effort founded by both parties, was unveiled this morning at the Triathlon Business International Conference in Tempe, Arizona, in a presentation led by IRONMAN CEO Andrew Messick and USA Triathlon CEO Rocky Harris.

“As an industry leader, we are proud to join forces with USA Triathlon to spearhead the development of Time to Tri,” said Andrew Messick, President and CEO for IRONMAN. “While a lot of effort has gone into this for the past few months, the truth is that we are really just beginning. The power, control and responsibility of this initiative lies with the entire industry and is truly something that should lead to the benefit of all, from athletes, to coaches, clubs, race directors and industry endemics. We all have a common interest in bringing new people into our sport.”

“Since coming onboard as USA Triathlon CEO, my focus has been to increase collaboration across the industry and work together on a shared goal of growing participation in triathlon,” Harris said. “Time to Tri is a critical step in that process, and we are proud to partner with IRONMAN in getting this effort off the ground. But, more importantly, this is an industry-wide initiative, and we will need the support of everyone across all of the sport’s constituency groups to be successful.”

By announcing the initiative at the TBI Conference, IRONMAN and USA Triathlon reached three key groups of industry stakeholders — coaches/clubs, race directors and retailers/brand manufacturers — with a call-to-action to sign a public pledge at and make this an initiative powered by the entire industry.

After signing the pledge, which asks stakeholders to spread the word about Time to Tri with their audiences via email and social media, signees will receive a “playbook” and a collection of branded digital assets to use in promoting the initiative. One of four playbooks will be distributed based on the signee’s affiliation as a race director, coach, club or brand, but each playbook includes sample messaging and strategic ideas for recruiting beginners to triathlon. In a public rollout on Monday, February 5, IRONMAN and USA Triathlon will also equip their respective members and athlete database with the tools to get involved.

The content at is inspired by qualitative and quantitative research that addresses key barriers to entry, such as swimming ability and open water swimming experience, triathlon knowledge, and the perception of a financial barrier.

The site will also offer editorial content as well as free, customized sprint-distance training plans to athletes who sign up with their email address. Each plan’s workouts are developed by USA Triathlon Certified and IRONMAN U® Certified Coaches and are based on the athlete’s self-selected skill level in the swim, bike and run.

In addition to launching the digital platform at, IRONMAN and USA Triathlon will engage in proactive outreach to identify new and aspiring triathletes. The running community is a primary target audience, and Time to Tri will have a presence at running race expos across the country in order to reach those athletes.

Time to Tri will also promote pool and indoor triathlons as a non-intimidating first triathlon experience — directly addressing the fear of open water swimming as a barrier to entry — as well as short-course (sprint- and Olympic-distance) racing, relays and beginner waves.

Building on the success of IRONMAN’s Women For Tri® initiative, Time to Tri will join forces with Women For Tri to increase the percentage of women triathletes (currently, that number is 39 percent) by driving the creation of women’s-only events and clinics while further supporting the Women For Tri online community.

Other outreach opportunities include partnering with the USA Triathlon Youth Splash & Dash Aquathlon Series, youth triathlon clubs and summer camps to recruit more young people to the sport; reaching new audiences on social media during the second annual National Triathlon Week this July; and enlisting the help of 44 of the nation’s top amateur triathletes through the USA Triathlon Ambassador Program.

To learn more about Time to Tri, and to sign a pledge to help grow the sport of triathlon in your community, visit For a list of sanctioned triathlon events taking place in 2018, visit

303Radio – Interview with Rocky Harris, CEO of USA Triathlon

303Radio interviewed Rocky Harris who was named CEO of USA Triathlon in August of this year. Since then Rocky has been working on a strategic plan, meeting with many constituents to bring some new perspectives to the governing body of Triathlon in the United States. One of his major objectives is simply increasing participation by embracing all distances and disciplines and growing the sport across all communities.

Rocky has spent much of his career in team sports ranging from Communications director for the Houston Texans to a member of the Super Bowl XXXVIII host committee and Director of Sports and Marketing for Reliant Energy. He most recently work for Arizona State University as Chief Operating Officer with direct oversight of Sun Devil Athletics. Here he was a key proponent in helping ASU become the first NCAA Power Five conference school to adopt triathlon.

Listen in to his great energy and personal passion for the sport of triathlon.

*we apologize for some unforeseen background noise that can be a bit distracting here and there, but still worth a listen!

Forget Triathlons. It’s Time for Aquabike.

From the Wall Street Journal

For triathletes who hate the running part, there’s a new sport that offers a path to glory

Kathleen A. Hughes competed in the ITU Aquabike World Championships earlier this year in Penticton, British Columbia. Photo:

When I proudly told friends that I had qualified for the world championships in aquabike this past August, at age 60, I faced blank stares and concerned questions.

“How does the bike move in the water?”

“Do you practice on a stationary bike in the pool?” my brother-in-law asked.

The answer is that aquabike is a relatively new sport in triathlon, a race that normally includes a swim, bike and run. In aquabike, you get to skip the run.

While races vary, the most common distance is a 1.2-mile swim and a 56-mile bike ride. “Swim, bike, done,” enthusiasts say.

While the number of participants in triathlons has declined in the past few years, aquabike is growing rapidly, partly by appealing to older athletes with running injuries.

“It’s growing like a weed,” says Chuck Graziano, a director of USA Triathlon who has a titanium knee and competes in aquabike. “It doesn’t include the pounding of running. It can be age-related, injury-related, or people who just prefer not to run.”

Indeed, the number of aquabike races sanctioned by USA Triathlon, the sport’s governing body, has more than doubled in five years to 562 races with 5,160 aquabikers last year.

Read the full article


Select elite athlete, age-group athlete and contributor nominees to be inducted next August in Cleveland

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — The deadline to nominate elite athletes, age-group athletes and contributors to the ninth induction class of the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame is approaching quickly, with nominations being accepted until Dec. 1. New inductees to the Hall of Fame will be honored during a banquet in Cleveland on Aug. 9, 2018, in conjunction with the USA Triathlon Age Group National Championships from Aug. 11-12.

Launched in 2008, the USA Triathlon Hall of Fame serves to recognize, honor and commemorate those individuals and groups that have demonstrated excellence in every aspect of multisport, thereby inspiring others to elevate their own performance, participation and community involvement.

Categories of eligibility include elite athletes, age-group athletes and contributors. The elite and age-group athlete categories recognize individuals who, while licensed as an elite or age-group athlete respectively by USA Triathlon, competed with great success in national or world events over a period of years; demonstrated outstanding sportsmanship; and contributed in other ways to the betterment of multisport.

To be nominated in the elite category, an athlete must not have competed as an elite for at least three years prior to consideration or must be at least 40 years old.

For both elite and age-group categories, achievements in all disciplines governed by USA Triathlon may be considered — including triathlon, duathlon, aquathlon, aquabike, paratriathlon, off-road triathlon and winter triathlon.

The contributor category is intended to honor an individual who has made significant contributions to the growth, reputation, character and/or success of any of the disciplines governed by USA Triathlon. A wide variety of roles may be considered under this designation, including but not limited to: sport pioneers; event organizers; officials; coaches; trainers; inventors of equipment, processes or systems; members of the media; volunteers; or others who have served the governing body.

Anyone may submit nominations in one or multiple of the eligible categories. All nominations will be reviewed by a selection committee to ensure that nominees meet the criteria. All nominations meeting the criteria will then be forwarded to a voting committee, which will consider the merits of each nominee and make the final designation.

The nomination form is available at and can be either completed and submitted directly online or emailed to


Jorgensen won the United States’ first-ever Olympic gold in triathlon. Photo by Delly Carr.

From USA Triathlon

Two-time ITU World Champion to pursue professional marathon racing

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — U.S. Olympic gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen today announced her plans to officially transition from professional triathlon and pursue a medal at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in the marathon. Jorgensen, who last year in Rio de Janeiro earned the United States’ first-ever Olympic gold medal in the sport of triathlon, makes the announcement after not competing in the 2017 season to give birth to her first child in August.

“Gwen will be forever remembered crossing the finish line in Rio to claim the gold medal at the 2016 Olympics, a true watershed moment in the history of USA Triathlon,” said Barry Siff, President of the USA Triathlon Board of Directors. “But she has also personified the ultimate role model for all athletes by continually giving back to the sport through efforts like the Gwen Jorgensen Scholarship. On behalf of every triathlete in the U.S., I wish Gwen — as well as her husband Patrick, and their new son Stanley — great joy, success and happiness in every possible way.”

“USA Triathlon brought me into this sport, and now I’m incredibly privileged to step away at the top, with an Olympic gold medal. Though my near-future training will be focused on winning gold in the marathon in Tokyo, I will always be a part of the USA Triathlon family and look forward to embracing every opportunity to help grow the sport of triathlon. In fact, I hope this new adventure in running will play a big part in doing exactly that,” Jorgensen said.

“Gwen has left an indelible mark on triathlon in this country and lifted the sport’s profile to unprecedented heights through her remarkable career over the past eight years,” said Rocky Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. “As a highly accomplished athlete who is yet so balanced in other areas of her life, Gwen has always served as a tremendous ambassador for USA Triathlon and will be sorely missed. We fully support her decision to pursue new dreams as a full-time marathon runner, and wish Gwen and her family nothing but continued success in this exciting new chapter.”

A standout runner and swimmer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Jorgensen was recruited into the sport in 2010 by USA Triathlon through its newly developed Collegiate Recruitment Program (CRP). That year she balanced work as a Certified Public Accountant at EY (formerly Ernst & Young) with training during her first season as an elite triathlete. She was named the 2010 USA Triathlon Rookie of the Year after a standout season in which she earned three podium finishes as a pro.

Jorgensen made the choice to pursue triathlon full-time in 2011, and claimed three ITU World Cup podiums. She qualified for her first U.S. Olympic Team in 2012 and was one of the United States’ top medal contenders in London, but suffered a flat tire on the bike and finished 38th overall.

Her 2013 season included a USA Triathlon Elite National Championship title, three ITU World Triathlon Series (WTS) victories and a bronze medal at the ITU Triathlon Mixed Relay World Championships.

Jorgensen went on to post a record-breaking 2014 season in which she became the first woman in ITU World Triathlon Series history to win eight career WTS events and five in one season. She claimed victory at the 2014 ITU World Triathlon Grand Final and earned the overall world championship title, becoming the first U.S. triathlete — male or female — to win a world title since 2004. Jorgensen’s 2014 season also included a win at the inaugural Island House Triathlon, a two-day stage race in the Bahamas.

In 2015, Jorgensen went undefeated in seven WTS starts and extended her win streak to 12. She became the first U.S. athlete to win back-to-back ITU World Championships, and punched her ticket to the 2016 Olympic Games with a victory at the Rio de Janeiro ITU Qualification Event. She capped her historic season with a successful defense of her title at the Island House Triathlon.

Though her win streak was broken with a silver-medal finish at ITU World Triathlon Gold Coast in April 2016, Jorgensen earned two more WTS gold medals and a bronze as she built toward the Rio 2016 Olympic Games that August. She also helped the United States capture its first-ever ITU Mixed Relay World Championship title in June 2016 alongside teammates Ben Kanute, Kirsten Kasper and Joe Maloy.

As the heavy favorite in Rio, Jorgensen outran defending Olympic champion Nicola Spirig of Switzerland and claimed the gold medal, becoming USA Triathlon’s first-ever Olympic champion. She covered the 1,500-meter swim, 40-kilometer bike and 10-kilometer run in 1 hour, 56 minutes, 16 seconds, crossing the line 40 seconds ahead of Spirig. Jorgensen went on to place second at the ITU World Triathlon Grand Final that September and take silver in the overall 2016 WTS rankings.

“It has been both a pleasure and an honor to work with Gwen over the years and to see her evolve from a newcomer in the sport to dominating the world’s best fields in Olympic-distance triathlon,” said Andy Schmitz, USA Triathlon High Performance General Manager. “Her accomplishments have permanently raised the bar within our U.S. National Team Program — for both women and men. And I have no doubt that her strong commitment to excellence will translate to a tremendous career in marathon racing.”

Shortly after the 2016 Olympic Games, Jorgensen announced her plans to run the New York City Marathon on Nov. 6, as well as her intention to start a family with husband Patrick Lemieux. Racing in her first-ever marathon, Jorgensen placed 14th in the elite women’s field with a time of 2:41:01.

She announced her pregnancy in January of 2017, and welcomed baby boy Stanley Allen Lemieux on Aug. 16.

Known for her strong run, it was a common sight for Jorgensen to make up significant deficits on competitors coming off the bike. In June of 2016, she overcame the largest deficit in ITU World Triathlon Series history in Leeds, England. Trailing Bermuda’s Flora Duffy by 1 minute, 40 seconds at the start of the run, she ran a 33:29 10k and won the race with a 51-second margin over Duffy.

Jorgensen leaves a legacy in the sport through the Gwen Jorgensen Scholarship, which she launched in 2014 to assist junior draft-legal triathletes and paratriathletes in their pursuit of excellence in the sport. More than $90,000 has been awarded to date in conjunction with the USA Triathlon Foundation, which contributes a matching grant. The recipients of the 2017 scholarship will be announced on Nov. 10. Gwen has also directly supported female development athletes by volunteering as a mentor coach at the USA Triathlon Junior Select Camp in Colorado Springs.

For Jorgensen’s personal announcement on Facebook, click here. For her complete career results and bio, visit