Butterfield Wins Bermuda Marathon in 2:27

Always one to recognize and compliment the competition, as well as thanking the cheering crowds, Longmont’s Tyler Butterfield won yesterday’s Bermuda Marathon with grace, and gratitude.

From the Royal Gazette

Tyler Butterfield followed in the example set by Dage Minors in Friday’s Elite Mile when he ran to victory in the Bermuda Marathon yesterday in near-perfect running conditions.

Butterfield, Bermuda’s top male triathlete who returned from his home in Boulder, Colorado to compete for the first time in several years, set the pace after a 1hr 14min time for the first loop on his way to a winning time of 2:27:07 ahead of last year’s winner, Bryan Morseman, of the United States, who clocked 2:28:43. Third was Abu Kebede Diriba, of Ethiopia, in 2:37:44.

“I’ve done one marathon before and that was a 2:42 [time] when I was 21, a good 14 years ago,” Butterfield said after his victory. “I ran a 2:48 in an Ironman, so I knew with a 2:42 I should be able to improve on that.”

Butterfield ran several miles with another local runner, Chayce Smith, who was competing in the Bermuda Half-Marathon.

“Chayce and I ran the first lap together and it was great hearing everyone cheering us on,” Butterfield said. “It was nice to have some locals up the front.

“Bryan led me through the first half and then we ran the first mile or two [second loop] together before I pulled away just after Trimingham Hill.

“There was a slight downhill before the flat to McGall’s Hill and I had speed coming off the hill and just went with it. I thought I might regret it later because it was a little quick. The first lap was a negative split but I have to say there was a lot of people out there cheering. Thank you to the people who come out every year.”

Butterfield and Morseman were tucked in with the Half-Marathon lead pack, before the field started to open up after the two-mile mark and Butterfield carried on to win,

Butterfield still holds the senior schools mile record of 4:27:30, which he set in 1999 when a student at Saltus.

 

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Tyler Butterfield tackling Bermuda Marathon this weekend

From the Royal Gazette

Triathlete Tyler Butterfield will run in Bermuda Marathon Weekend as he continues his preparation for the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia, in April.

Butterfield is to return home from Boulder, Colorado, tomorrow and will be among hundreds taking part in the full marathon on Sunday — the final race of the three-day event.

The 34-year-old, whose schedule does not usually allow him to compete in the Bermuda Marathon Weekend, will also take part in the Butterfield & Vallis 5K next weekend, which marks the 100th anniversary of his family’s wholesale business.

“I’m super excited about doing a road race in Bermuda again,” Butterfield said.

“I miss doing May 24, but some years the timing works and others it doesn’t due to other races over here in the United States or internationally.

“I’m pumped to get to do a bit of Bermuda Marathon Weekend, a weekend I used to always look forward to when I lived on the island. I’m not looking at anything special from myself in the marathon; I just want to enjoy it.

“I will be racing off mostly base training and it will be one of my last long, harder runs before I switch to focus on more speed.”

Butterfield left his mark in the schools’ KPMG Front Street Mile races in the early 2000s when he set several records. His schedule will not allow him to return in time to watch those races.

“I would love to come on Thursday to watch the Front Street Mile on Friday night, but I’ve one other sponsor trip I had to do this week, today and tomorrow.”

Butterfield is also looking forward to competing in the Butterfield & Vallis race, along with brother Spencer. He will also be the guest speaker at the Bermuda Triathlon Association’s prize-giving dinner at the Loft at Flanagan’s next Saturday.

“Tickets for that are available at Raceday World, and it should be a fun night talking about modern racing, the old days of triathlon and racing with my dad Jim.

“Then the next day I will be at the Butterfield & Vallis 5k to celebrate the [company’s] 100th anniversary. It’s a perfect distance for everyone to come out and enjoy a family event.

“It’s great to be able to be home for both weekends and three great events. Bermuda always has so much going on.”

Butterfield will then turn his focus to the Commonwealth Games, where he hopes to be a part of a triathlon relay team including Flora Duffy, Tyler Smith and Erica Hawley.

“After this trip to Bermuda, it will be back to Colorado and a training camp in Arizona to start to get ready for Commonwealth Games in April,” he said.

 

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Most likeable guy in triathlon? Longmont’s Tyler Butterfield talks with 303Radio about KONA

303Radio‘s Bill Plock interviewed Tyler Butterfield – one of the most likeable guys in pro triathlon. From his youth in Bermuda to his new hobby farm in Longmont, the guy is nothing but friendly from all angles. He has huge respect for his fellow competitors, is humble in his accomplishments, entirely devoted to his family, grateful to his parents and sponsors, and remembers every name his 6-year-old daughter gave to their herd of adorable pet goats (with a seemingly princess theme)… Headed to #Kona, he just might land on the podium again. We’ll be watching and cheering for sure.  (Photo by Bill Plock)

 

Butterfield’s Orderly Results: Tyler Scores Another Step Up At Ironman 70.3 Worlds

September 12, 2017 – Professional triathlete Tyler Butterfield logged another world-class performance to score seventh place at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship on Sunday in Chattanooga, Tennessee, his best 70.3 World Championship finish to date. The result marked Butterfield’s steady progression through the top ten at the championship event, having finished ninth in 2013,, eighth in 2015, and now seventh in 2017, and bodes well for his fitness in the final five-week lead into the Ironman World Championship on October 14th in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. His corresponding Kona finishes in those years were his best to date—seventh in 2013 and fifth in 2015—showing a pattern of success when tackling the 70.3 Championship prior to the Ironman World Championship, his primary focus for several years now.

Butterfield clocked 25:20 in the 1.2-mile swim, emerging with the main group of men containing all the key contenders outside of swim leaders Ben Kanute, the eventual second- place finisher, and Javier Gomez, prolific triathlon champion and silver medalist at the Olympic Games, who went on to win.

Ten men—including Butterfield and Ironman world record holder Tim Don—rode in the chase pack, with hard-charging Sebastian Kienle, a two-time victor at the race, coming from behind. Entering T2, Butterfield was in third; within 30 seconds a flurry of six other top rivals flew in and out of transition and quickly sorted themselves out on the road ahead, with Butterfield now running in sixth. Gomez, known for his spectacular run speed, made quick work from further back in the field to knock off every forward challenger and claim the world title. Butterfield held steady and strong, and ultimately crossed the line in seventh with a 1:17:32 half marathon and 3:56:22 finish time.

“I wasn’t able to put in my usual attacks on the bike. It was hard enough just being there! Racing at this level gets more and more competitive every year. I looked around and everyone in the group was a world title holder, world record holder, or at least someone who has won a lot of races. You can’t just get away from these guys whenever you like,” said Butterfield.

“I also wanted to wait and test my run,” he continued. “I wanted to really get a feel for my run fitness in advance of Kona—something you can’t fully gauge outside of a race environment. I haven’t had the opportunity to get in the run training I’d like for a number of years—partly because of injury, but now, looking back, also because of where we lived.”

For more information please visit Butterfieldracing.com

Since the family’s move from their mountain home to a farm in rural Boulder County, Butterfield has been able to run straight out the door, rather than spend time driving to and from town. Living at a lower altitude (5,600 feet, as opposed to 7,400 feet) has also allowed him to cope with a higher workload. Additionally, he has found that the convenience of being able to go home between sessions has helped his recovery.

“I was a little disappointed with my run, considering the training I’ve had. It was solid, but nothing special. Really, I should be running only a little slower than that for an entire marathon if I want to be in the mix in Kona,” said Butterfield, who averaged 5:55 minute miles in Sunday’s race. “I’m not sure if I was still a little tired from the training. I certainly gave this race the respect it deserves and came in tapered, but I think I may have carried in a bit too much long-term fatigue. I’m hoping I can get in the remaining training I need in the next five weeks, as well as shake some of the residual tiredness from my Kona overload. It’s kind of hard to do both at once—get fitter and fresher—but I’ll try.”

Butterfield indeed appears to be on track for another impressive race on the Big Island, as evidenced by a steady pattern of improving results. His 2017 regular season performances started with fourth at Ironman 70.3 Dubai, then third at the Ironman North American Championship, followed by second at Ironman 70.3 Monterrey, and finally a win at Ironman 70.3 Raleigh. This pattern of improvement also shows in his Ironman 70.3 World Championship progression—ninth in 2013, eighth in 2015, and seventh in 2017—and in his Kona performances, where he finished seventh in 2013 and fifth in 2015.

“I guess I like to keep my results orderly,” joked Butterfield. “In all seriousness, I do like the steady progress upward. It’s rewarding to see the results of all the hard work, as my entire family sacrifices year-round to help me be the best I can be. Hopefully with the focused training I’ve had so far and the time remaining, I can continue to improve all the way into Kona.”

Butterfield now heads back home to Colorado for his final Kona training block, with five short weeks remaining until the Ironman World Championship.

Boulder Pro Tyler Butterfield Wins Raleigh 70.3

WATCH FOR TYLER BUTTERFIELD RACING IRONMAN BOULDER SUNDAY!

From Slowtwitch

Tyler Butterfield of Bermuda ran down Andrew Yoder of the U.S. and Stephanie Roy of Canada ran down a U.S. trio of Lauren Brandon, Liz Lyles and Lesley Smith to earn the elite titles at Ironman 70.3 Raleigh.

Men

Antoine Jolicoeur Desroches of Canada led the swim in 24:55 which gave him a 5 seconds advantage on Yoder, 7 seconds on Butterfield, 9 seconds on James Hadley of Great Britain, 1:38 on Jason Laundry of Canada, 3:12 on Luke McKenzie of Australia, and 3:27 on Kennett Peterson of the U.S.

At 24 miles, renowned biker Andrew Yoder seized the lead by 3 seconds over Butterfield at 24 miles, followed by Jackson Laundry and Desroches about 2:20 back. A third pack of five including Matthew Russell, Peterson, Hadley, Derek Kidwell, and Matthew Wisthoff trailed by 3:45 to 3:56.

After a race-best 2:03:14 bike split, Yoder led the way into T2 by 3:14 over Butterfield, 4:22 over Laundry, 5:43 over Peterson, 5:44 over Russell, 7:47 over Desroches, and 10:19 over Hadley.

Yoder held his advantage over Butterfield through 3.47 miles, but by 6.63 miles the Bermudan cut his deficit to 2:20. Laundry was also moving up, trailing Butterfield by just 7 seconds while Peterson fell back to 6:11 arrears.

Two-thirds through the run, Butterfield passed Yoder on his way to a 1:19:22 run and a finish of 3:53:22, 1:48 ahead of runner-up Yoder and 2:54 ahead of 3rd place Laundry.

Read the Women’s results