Weekend Preview: Summer Is Here

Triathlon Events

Thursday June 22nd

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Vixxen Racing OWS Clinic

Boulder Reservoir


Stroke & Stride

Boulder Reservoir


Friday June 23rd

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Saturday June 24th

 

TriBella Women’s Triathlon

Cherry Creek Reservoir


Solstice Swim

Union Reservoir


Alison Dunlap Level II MTB Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Lake to Lake Triathlon

Loveland


Tri the Boat – Sprint & Oly

Stagecoach Reservoir, Steamboat Springs


Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Sunday June 25th

 

South Suburban Indoor TRYathlon

Centennial


Boulder Sunrise Triathlon-Duathlon-Run

Boulder Reservoir


Tri the Boat – Half

Stagecoach Reservoir, Steamboat Springs


Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Alison Dunlap Level II MTB Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


USAT Paratriathlon National Championships

Kenosha, Wi



Cycling Events

Thursday June 22nd

 

BVV Track Night

Erie


Friday June 23rd

 

Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


Chainless World Championships

Crested Butte


Saturday June 24th

 

2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies

The inaugural 2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies will bring seven timed and ranked stages to Colorado June 24-30. In addition to start and finish venues of Boulder and Colorado Springs, the event will visit Winter Park, Avon, Snowmass Village and Crested Butte Organisers expect the 600-rider peloton to sell-out, but a limited number of discounted


Colorado Bike MS

Ft. Collins


Alison Dunlap MTB Level II Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Prestige Imports Snowmass Loop MTB Fondo

Snowmass


Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


WP Epic Single Track: Super Loop

Winter Park


Pedaling 4 Parkinson’s

Lone Tree


Fat Tire 40

Crested Butte


4SOH

Ft. Collins


Art by Bike Tours of Loveland

Loveland


USA Pro Road & TT National Championships


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 MTB Skills Clinic

Boulder


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1.5 MTB Skills Clinic

Erie


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 MTB Skills Clinic

Boulder


Community Cycles Membership Party

Boulder


Sunday June 25th

 

2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies

The inaugural 2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies will bring seven timed and ranked stages to Colorado June 24-30. In addition to start and finish venues of Boulder and Colorado Springs, the event will visit Winter Park, Avon, Snowmass Village and Crested Butte Organisers expect the 600-rider peloton to sell-out, but a limited number of discounted


Parker Mainstreet Criterium

Parker


SMC – Breck Mtn Enduro

Breckenridge


Colorado Bike MS

Ft. Collins


Alison Dunlap MTB Level II Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


SOH

Ft. Collins


Avista Women’s Weekly Ride

Louisville


USA Pro Road & TT National Championships

Women’s Wednesday: The Joy of Participation

“I want to shake the way competitiveness creeps under my skin and into my soul, taking over expectations and suffocating my enjoyment”

By Lisa Ingarfield

The Joy of Participation

One of my friends recently hashtagged #OhSummerHowIveMissedYou. And this one hashtag encapsulated exactly how I am feeling. June is here! I love June because with June comes the Colorado triathlon season, long summer days, and lots and lots of outdoor time. Last year, I vowed that when I looked back on 2017, I would be able to show a fuller life than just swimming, biking, and running. And while that is still a goal I will approach with intention, I am excited to get back in the game. Marathon training is behind me and I am looking forward to one triathlon a month ’til November. Open water swimming is abundant and I get to see the sun rise while quietly slipping through the calm waters of a local lake before work.

My goal for this season is to decouple my participation in triathlon races from stress and nervousness and recouple it with a “whatever happens, happens” attitude. I don’t know that I will ever shake the nerves of preparing to swim in open water but what I more precisely want to shake is the way competitiveness creeps under my skin and into my soul, taking over expectations and suffocating my enjoyment. I think many of us have been there, when participating in a race causes more stress than laughter. It ceases to be enjoyable because we have somehow lost sight of the awesomeness that is our ability to participate in such an event. I want to bounce with joy at the fact I get to participate all summer in swimming, and biking, and running.

While I am eager to challenge myself through racing this season, I can’t help but think racing is a funny thing. It is predicated on winning, competing, and beating others. And while this isn’t necessarily always a negative, it can be. One’s worth is often defined by their place on the results list. Or at least this is what it is for many. And even when scores of people say it’s not about where you land, but the process that gets you there, for many of us, the landing still somehow matters more. I often get sucked into this mentality. This season, however, I am going to actively resist this mindset. I want to disentangle myself from the stress and elitism of competition. When it weaves its way around our brains, we can completely abandon enjoyment as we get so focused on winning and losing, succeeding and failing. And this is not what I want from my season.

Let’s keep it simple this year, 303Triathlon readers. For those of you who have this down already, good for you. Share with your friends how you do it. And for those of us who oscillate back and forth between competitiveness and the joy of participation (I realize these are not necessarily mutually exclusive), let’s work on it. While nerves and competition are not universally bad, and in some cases can be motivating, let’s keep them in check. How great is it that we can swim, bike, and run our way through summer and beyond? And when you feel the insidious creep of putting your time above your enjoyment or someone else’s experience, stop and pause. Be kind. A race is just a race; one moment in time. It is our treatment of others that will be remembered. Go after that goal instead.

Lisa Ingarfield, PhD is a runner, triathlete, USAT and RRCA certified coach. She owns Tri to Defi Coaching and Consulting and provides organizational communication evaluation and consulting services. She is a freelance writer specializing in issues affecting women, particularly in sport and is a member of Vixxen Racing’s 2017 women’s triathlon team.

 

Becky Piper: Xterra Nats qualifier, savagely attacked, comatose & paralyzed, and back to Xterra again – at local Lory race

By Sasha Underwood

Several years ago Becky Piper was attacked while living in Guam by would be armed robbers, severely beaten with a gun and left to die. Local naval doctors immediately evacuated her to San Diego for treatment. She is now partially paralyzed. Yesterday she completed Xterra Lory. What happened in between is remarkable and brought tears to my eyes watching her finish knowing all that she went through to even compete.  You can read about her account HERE.

Prior to the attack, Becky was an ultra-marathon runner. A friend of hers had mentioned the Xterra in Guam and essentially challenged her by saying because he was a guy he would be faster than her and would beat her time – which ignited a small fire in her. She trained and completed the 2013 Xterra Guam, finishing 2nd in her age group and qualified for the Xterra National Championships.  Oh, and her friend, did not even start because he didn’t train.

Shortly after that she was attacked.  When she finally emerged from her coma weeks later and barely started talking, she asked the doctors if she could resume racing. They explained that her paralysis may be permanent – to which she replied, “Ok, well that’s why there’s a Para Athlete division!” After spending some time with her I can only imagine her saying that in a matter-of-fact, upbeat, genuine way with that huge Becky smile of hers!

She is now paralyzed on her right side and uses a brace to walk. Within the past three years, she has become a USAT Coach with Team MPI, and she completed two sprint triathlons last year. Check out her accomplishments on her Facebook page!

When we met last year, I asked if she would be doing Xterra’s again. She explained that she would like to but wasn’t sure of which one would be suitable for her. I immediately thought of Xterra Lory – it’s such a great course for beginners and experts alike. A flowy bike course with a great climb of a run.

She signed up for Xterra Lory at the beginning of this year. I mentioned how I love that race but I can’t run anymore since my hip surgery in November, to which she replied, “then walk! I’m doing it!” Of course I signed up after that. Originally I was going to race the swim and bike portion and have my mom do the run.

Becky was nervous about the bike portion. She pre-rode the course a couple times and a few days before the race I asked her if she would feel more confident if I rode behind her on the bike course. She loved that idea so I planned to stay with her the entire race.

The Swim:

We put on our wetsuits to go do a quick practice swim. It was the first open water swim of the year for both of us – nothing like waiting until race day! Anna, Becky’s transition handler, and Sam, Becky’s husband, helped Becky into her wetsuit. The best part was watching them lift Becky up by either side and try to shake her into her wetsuit! I REALLY wish I had taken a picture of that!

The entrance to the lake was slick and muddy and several athletes slipped while entering. It was a good time to discuss a strategy for Anna to help Becky out of the water when she finished. The water was chilly and both Becky and I had a little cold water shock panic when we put our face in the water.  We were in wave seven so we had plenty of time to practice. By the second wave we were comfortable and I tried to stay slightly to her right and in front of her so she could follow me.

We finished faster than her projected time in under 30minutes!

The Bike:

Sam modified Becky’s bike so all of the shifters and brakes are on the left side. In addition, her bike is a full suspension, more of a down-hill, slack geometry and has a 27.5 wheel on the front with a 26 wheel on the back. Becky can’t stand up to get over obstacles or downhill sections so the wheels and geometry of the bike help put her in a better position to ride that type of terrain.

I had so much fun riding with her! Becky had named many sections of the bike course from pre-riding it. The first section she named ‘Bridges Galore’ (but later renamed it to ‘Why Will Becky’s Foot Not Stay On the Pedal’). Next came ‘Where Becky Endo’d’. Then ‘Holy Crap! Look At All the Uphill!’ And last but not least, ‘The Part I Only Saw Once Because the Other Time I got a Flat Tire.’

This girl would fall over, get back up, and do it again. Over, and over, and over again. I was so impressed with her tenacity and perseverance – all the while with a ginormous smile on her face. At one point she fell over, threw her arm up and with a grin from ear to ear said, “ta-dah!” I’m so glad I was there to help out when I could and put her foot back into her unruly pedal. By the end of the bike we pretty much had that down to a science.

Her family and friends were waiting for her at the bike finish cheering with excitement. Anna and Sam helped her transition, changing her biking brace to her running brace made with carbon fiber which is more comfortable and allows better mobility for hiking.

The Run:

I originally was going to do the run with Becky but I forgot my running shoes. Fortunately my mom, who was already planning to run, ran with her instead.  Becky described her run as an attempt to get over rocks. She fell a few times, ended up with a mysterious scrape down her entire length of her arm, and has a bruised and skinned knee… but she did it. She explained that my mom gasped the first time she fell but by the 5th time she was unphased. That’s just what happens. You fall, and then you just get back up.

Becky’s friends and family ran with her through the last 200 yards leading up to the finisher’s chute. I personally could not hold back the tears of joy, knowing what I know about Becky, knowing how meaningful it is to train and overcome obstacles and push through no matter the odds or what life throws at you… knowing what it feels like to cross the finish line of my first 5k, 10k, Marathon and Ironman… the feeling is the same and I couldn’t help the tears from flowing. Looking around there was not a dry eye among us.

Becky is incredibly motivating, inspiring and her up-beat, nothing-can-get-me-down attitude is infectious. I am honored to have raced with her and call her my friend. I look forward to watching her race the Boulder Half Ironman in August!

 

 

 

 

Mile High Endurance IRONMAN Boulder recap, pro interviews, and cycling safety, fatal auto & cyclist accidents

Mile High Endurance is your weekly connection to coaches, experts and pro athletes to help you reach your endurance and triathlon goals.  In this episode, Rich Soares offers an Ironman Boulder recap and 303Triathlon race day interviews including Rachel Joyce, Timothy O’Donnell, Mike Reilly and more.  Also, this week’s feature interview is with Todd Plymale-Mallory on cycling safety and how to avoid getting hit.  Check out the Cycling Magazine article This Has Got To Stop on fatal auto & cyclist accidents.

IRONMAN Boulder 303Triathlon Recap

By Jen Findley

IRONMAN Boulder week is such a special week.  There are so many activities and events.  So much excitement and energy.  Hard to imagine that in the scope of life, it was over in the blink of an eye.

In case you didn’t have a chance to ‘see it all,’ 303Triathlon had you covered.  Here’s a recap of pre-race events, race-day coverage from predawn bag check and bus loading at Boulder High School to the last athlete crossing the finish line at about midnight Sunday night.

Shortly after the 2016 IRONMAN Boulder race was put to rest, we learned that the 2017 race would have a new Race Director.  We knew that Dave Christen would not let just anyone take over the event.  Tim Brosious was announced as the new race director.  I think we would all agree that Tim did an outstanding job.

So, here’s how the week went.

Thursday Events:

  • Paradox Sports in Eldorado Canyon
  • IRONMAN Staff loving their jobs
  • Team Colorado
  • Boulder Stroke & Stride
  • Pease Brothers at Big Ring Cycles
  • Storytime with Mike Reilly at Colorado Multi Sport

Read all about it HERE

 


Friday and Saturday Events:

Underpants Run
Opening Ceremonies

 

 

 

 

 

 

Race day tips: athlete to athlete

 

 

Rachel Joyce on how she’s feeling going into race day HERE


Race Day Photos:

 

With our staff all over the course, we have so many photos!  Here are a few favorites and links to our Facebook albums.

 


No race would be complete with our a little controversy as several pro men were DQ’d, STORY HERE

 

New this year in our coverage was Rich Soares and 303Radio interviews with Pros, staff & officials and of course the fans.

Pro Interviews with TO, Matt Chrabot, Rachel Joyce and Heather Jackson HERE

 

 

Did you see our Facebook and Twitter Posts?  Great interviews with fans, families, athletes and staff.  From predawn bus load FB live to midnight last athlete across the finish line here.

Facebook videos HERE

Twitter Feed HERE


No event of any kind is successful with out volunteers

Jen Szabo, the best volunteer coordinator any RD could dream of!

Or a Recap video, this one by 303Tri’s Kenny Withrow:

We have such a great time on these big race days cheering for friends we know and friends in triathlon.  So proud of everyone who toed the line and crossed the finish to Mike Reilly’s voice bellowing ” Your Are An IRONMAN!”

Changes for the 2018 IRONMAN Boulder, including lower pricing, and ‘When Can I Register for Next Year?’ HERE

 

 

Tri Hearter: Reflections on IRONMAN Boulder’s Epic Nature

Warren Mine

By Bill Plock

About 20 minutes after the last person crossed the finish line at IRONMAN Boulder, it hit me. That feeling of wow, what a great day. The next day at the awards ceremony it bowled me over just what had happened. The epic nature and vibe of an IRONMAN comes down to thousands of moments, some inspiring, others mesmerizing and many simply beautiful that causes the ultimate appreciation and respect for the race and the athletes. At some point it just becomes overwhelming if you let it–in a good way.

I was walking with 73 year old Warren Mine of California (the oldest to complete IM Boulder in 2017) to help him retrieve his bike talking about his race (his 20th+ IRONMAN) when champion Tim O’Donnell walked by on his way to get his bike. I kind of shook my head in disbelief and reflected. What a crazy sport I thought. Here is one of the top athletes in the world, having just won the race, simply going to pick up his bike, limping a bit and commenting how his legs hurt–like everyone else’s. When LeBron finishes a game I’m guessing he doesn’t even pick up his basketball shoes. The mingling of pro’s and amateurs all aiming for the same goal, with the same vulnerabilities, the same dedication and similar dreams and hopes sets triathlon apart. It endears all of us triathletes. It builds bonds and communities and lasts a lifetime.

To spectate IRONMAN Boulder for the first time convinced me more than ever that through this endeavor lives are changed. Relationships begin, are cemented, and are celebrated by a common event experienced uniquely for everyone. I parked myself for over two hours photographing hundreds of Colorado athletes as they entered the run course from T2. The relief and smiles to be on the run leg permeated most, and their hopeful gaze for a good run was greeted by hundreds of cheering people lining Boulder Creek. Hours passed. I walked miles, taking more pictures, cheering and remembering my runs on this creek for the past three IRONMAN Boulders. All I could think about was the love and support I always felt and that was the only thing I missed about not racing. It’s addictive and appreciated. I thought how lucky all these people were to experience it–especially first timers. They will never forget it.

Champion Tim O’Donnell awards finisher medals during the magical midnight hour

Later that night, during the last hour of the race, I simply sat a few feet from finishers who were greeted by Tim O’Donnell and his wife and three time IRONMAN World Champion, Mirinda Carfrae. The unofficial triathlon king and queen of Boulder graciously medaled each of the final age groupers. Most gazed in disbelief or were too dazed and confused to grasp the significance–but once they understood who was putting their arms around them, the smiles beamed.

To witness the tears, the joy, the pain, the end, and really the beginning of a new journey for so many sticks in my mind. Tears came to my eyes many times.

But no race is complete without recognizing those who win and rise above. Those who persevere the most, overcome amazing challenges and earn one of the toughest and most coveted entries in all of sport–a chance to compete in Kona. A spot reserved for the top 2%. The dreams of the athletes, their families and coaches hang in the balance of getting a spot.

It’s not as clear cut as you might think. Going into the awards all that is known is that 40 spots are awarded. They are then divided among all age groups proportional to how many people raced in the age group.

Some age groups have one entry, others as many as three of four. But not every athlete chooses to go or some have an entry from

EK Endurance Sports, Vixxen Racing & BTC Elite Coach Eric Kenney

an earlier race so their spot rolls down. Each time an athlete’s name is called and there is no response, some athlete hoping and waiting erupts in emotion–some show it more than others and it is wonderful to witness (you must be present to claim a spot). The tension can be thick.

Coach Eric Kenney and his athlete Liz West

In the female 30 to 34 age group, local athlete, Team Vixxen Racing member, Elizabeth West, was third in her age group with two spots up for grabs. She is coached by Eric Kenney of EK Endurance. I knew how anxious Eric was, hoping to see her dream come true. If you know Eric, you know he wears his heart on his sleeve.

As Mike Reilly began to announce that age group I was nervous. My personal connection and empathy for Liz and knowing how close she has been in past years and remembering how I felt missing a spot by one place two years ago, put a lump in my throat in anticipation. Mike called the first name. Silence. He called it again. More silence.

Tears swelled in my eyes and I gazed not at Liz, but at Eric a few feet away, standing alone to the side. He crumpled to a knee and couldn’t fight the tears. That moment will last a lifetime. Liz hugged many and tears came to her as well and her mom sat crying; it was simply beautiful.

Ironman Boulder is over, dreams are cast and inspiring stories will be told for a long long time.

303Radio Interviews IRONMAN Boulder top pro finishers O’Donnell, Chrabot, Joyce, Jackson

IRONMAN Boulder 2017 Pro Champions Rachel Joyce and Tim O’Donnell

Rich Soares of Mile High Endurance now commands 303Radio, and he hit the finish chute to interview Sunday’s top pro champions – take a listen to the fresh-off-the-course thoughts!

303Radio Interviews with IRONMAN Boulder Staff & Officials

Rich Soares of Mile High Endurance interviews IRONMAN Boulder Staff & Officials- Featuring Dave Christen & Mike Reilly-

Enjoy your listen!

303Radio Interviews with IRONMAN Boulder Fans

Rich Soares of Mile High Endurance joins the 303 Team, taking over 303Radio on 303Triathlon with a burst of interviews from IRONMAN Boulder…

Here, a few installments from the “Fans & Spectators” Category-

Enjoy your listen!