Takeaways from the Outspoken: Women in Triathlon Summit

Back in late spring or early summer, I – saw an ad? got an email? – announcing the inaugural “Outspoken: Women in Triathlon Summit.” Outspoken: check. Woman: check. Triathlon: check. So while I wasn’t sure exactly what to expect from the weekend, I knew I wanted to be a part of it. I anticipated inspiring women, new connections, and stimulating conversation, but really didn’t know what else the weekend might hold, right up until I walked onto the rooftop deck at a hotel in Arizona for the first night of the inaugural Summit.

Meredith Kessler may not have realized it at the time, but she set the tone for the weekend as she stood at the podium to present the Opening Keynote and told us, “I need you to come closer.” And we did. Our group of 100, comprised of pros, both relatively new and deeply experienced age-groupers, coaches, and industry leaders, walked forward from corners of the rooftop and gathered together – that night and for the remainder of the weekend. We listened to speeches and panels and asked questions and participated in discussions, all of which were raw and honest and personal. We had come closer.

While I couldn’t possibly recount the entire weekend’s worth of stories and dialogue – and really, if you weren’t there you’re just going to have to accept that you don’t get all the details – here are some of my favorite takeaways from the weekend:

• Me, someone who thinks that wearing any attire not designed for sweating is “dressing up:” A conference that advises wearing comfortable shoes and includes morning coached swim and run workouts is my kind of conference.

Senator-Elect Krysten Sinema

• Sally Edwards, pioneering and incredibly accomplished endurance athlete and former spokesperson for the Danskin women’s triathlon series: Triathlon began in the 1980s with a fascinating cultural juxtaposition, both establishing a progressive policy of equal prize money for pro men and women while simultaneously judging female triathletes based on looks rather than ability, shunning pro female triathletes from magazine covers if they “weren’t pretty enough.”

• Kyrsten Sinema, Congresswoman and Senator-Elect from Arizona: In order from least to most difficult, it goes like this: run for Congress, train for and complete an Ironman, run for Senate.

• Meredith Atwood, a.k.a. Swim Bike Mom: “Words are the house you live in” (although she did attribute the quote to someone whose name she acknowledge she couldn’t quite pronounce). If we look in the mirror and criticize our body’s appearance rather than celebrate its strength, we are going down the wrong path.

• Me, a person who apparently doesn’t set goals unless I understand that they are achievable: I had no idea how many people’s stories include “I didn’t know how to swim or own a bike, but I signed up for a triathlon and here I am!”

Meredith Atwood,
a.k.a. Swim Bike Mom

• Dr. Stacy Sims, Environmental Exercise Physiologist and Nutrition Scientist specializing in sex differences with regards to performance: Women are not small men. It turns out that when you do tests and trials that only include male subjects, the results are often not applicable to women. For example: the common thinking on heat acclimation protocols and the effectiveness – or lack thereof – of ice baths is accurate for men, but not for women. (Want more info on what is applicable to women? Buy her book, ROAR – I just did.)

• Gabriela Gallegos, Race Director of the Mighty Mujer Triathlon: Let’s have the Wonder Woman version and not the Princess version. (Me: oh hell yes!)

Ultimately, the inaugural Outspoken: Women in Triathlon Summit was exactly what I anticipated it would be. I listened to stories from inspiring women, I made new connections with women across the spectrum of the triathlon community, and I had and heard stimulating conversations about where triathlon is today and where it needs to be tomorrow. The Summit provided an environment where one could raise provoking and sometimes challenging questions that might otherwise be reserved for one-on-one conversations. Panelists, speakers, and conference attendees alike stepped away from formal dialogue where certain topics are simply alluded to, and spoke in raw and honest and personal terms about sexism and empowerment, our strong and unique bodies, gender equality, and inclusion for minorities and transgender athletes.

Beyond that, the Summit provided an opportunity for each of us take ownership of growing the sport of triathlon and specifically the representation of women and minorities within the sport. After the closing brainstorming session, each participant – from the pro to the age grouper to the coach to the industry leader – left with actionable items, and a forum for reporting back on her progress. I am excited to see where these action items take us over the next year, and what stories and conversations those actions create for next year’s Summit.

Kyle Coon Continues to Excel

Kyle Coon has had quite a 2018 season.

In October he won the Silver medal and the ITU Paratriathlon World Cup Race.

Article here

 

In November he was named as one of three Parathletes to be added to the USA Resident Team at the Colorado Springs OTC.

Article here

 

And, just this past weekend, Kyle and guide Alan Greening, finish IMAZ in under 11 hours!

Video from 12news.com in Phoenix, AZ  here

 

 

 

Three Athletes Added to USA Paratriathlon Resident Team at U.S. Olympic Training Center

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon today announced the roster for the 2019 USA Paratriathlon Resident Team, an elite squad based at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Melissa Stockwell (Chicago, Ill.), Kendall Gretsch (Downers Grove, Ill.) and Kyle Coon (Carbondale, Colo.) will join current resident team athletes Allysa Seely (Glendale, Ariz.), Howie Sanborn (Denver, Colo.) and Hailey Danz (Wauwatosa, Wis.) as they train for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games and other elite races on the International Triathlon Union circuit.

The resident team first opened its doors in April as the fifth Paralympic sport to call the Colorado Springs campus home. USA Triathlon Level I Certified Coach Derick Williamson (Colorado Springs, Colo.) is the program’s head coach.

Read the complete article here

Melissa Stockwell celebrates victory as a member of Team USA – Photo Credit: USA Triathlon – Joe Kusumoto

Lifetime Fitness Indoor Triathlon

Flatirons, Parker

 

The indoor triathlon is based on time rather than distance — meaning you receive points for going further in a specific period of time, not going faster over a fixed distance. The total event lasts for 75 minutes, consisting of:

  • Swim: 10 minutes in the pool
  • Transition 1: 10-minutes (move from the pool to cycle studio)
  • Bike: 30 minutes on an indoor bike
  • Transition 2: 5-minutes  (move from the cycle studio to treadmills)
  • Run: 20 minutes on a treadmill

New in 2019: Indoor Triathlon Relay Division!
Not quite ready to do it all? Grab your friends and form an Indoor Tri Relay Team!  What better way to get involved, have a great workout while cheering on your teammates to victory! The cumulative distance covered by your swimmer (10 min. swim), cyclist (30 min. bike)  and runner (20 min run) will rank your team in the new Relay Division.  Creative team names are highly encouraged!

 

Event details and registration here

Lifetime Fitness Indoor Tri

Centennial, Colorado Springs, Westminster

 

The indoor triathlon is based on time rather than distance — meaning you receive points for going further in a specific period of time, not going faster over a fixed distance. The total event lasts for 75 minutes, consisting of:

  • Swim: 10 minutes in the pool
  • Transition 1: 10-minutes (move from the pool to cycle studio)
  • Bike: 30 minutes on an indoor bike
  • Transition 2: 5-minutes  (move from the cycle studio to treadmills)
  • Run: 20 minutes on a treadmill

New in 2019: Indoor Triathlon Relay Division!
Not quite ready to do it all? Grab your friends and form an Indoor Tri Relay Team!  What better way to get involved, have a great workout while cheering on your teammates to victory! The cumulative distance covered by your swimmer (10 min. swim), cyclist (30 min. bike)  and runner (20 min run) will rank your team in the new Relay Division.  Creative team names are highly encouraged!

 

Event details and registration here

Kona: It’s More Than Just the Race

It’s generally understood that Kona, i.e. the Ironman World Championship, is different from all the other Ironman races. Often people associate this difference with both the fact that you have to qualify to earn your spot at the start line (or earn it through one of seven other ways), and that therefore the athlete field at the race represents the cream of the crop. And while all of this is certainly true, it’s just scratching the surface of why this race stands out so dramatically from just about any other race you’ve attended.

First off, because this is like the Superbowl / World Series / Stanley Cup of triathlon, the crowds are insane. And Kona is a really, really small little town normally. Just as a comparison, based on some back-of-the-napkin calculations, here’s how Kona compares to, say, IM Boulder:

KONA IM BOULDER
City Population 12,000 111,000
Number of Out-of-Town Athletes 2400 1000
Average Size of Athlete’s Entourage 4 1
Total Entourage 9600 1000
Additional Visitors: Staff, Volunteers, Industry, Media, Triathlon Royalty 3000 200
Total Athletes, Entourage, Visitors 15000 2200
Growth of City Population due to Event 125% 2%

So, as you can start to see, Kona is busting at the seams – and then some – during race week. Not to mention the fact that people start arriving 7 or even 10 days before the race, rather than the Thursday of race week. Because of that, you need to set up lodging and rental cars as early as possible. And you need to anticipate that everything is going to be busy – parking lots, restaurants, local street traffic – everything.

One thing that’s really neat about the crowds, though, is how international it all is. (I mean, it is the World Championship, so this shouldn’t come as a surprise.) Athlete briefings are given in seven different languages – English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, and German. And everywhere you go you hear different languages and accents. It really, truly deserves the title of a world championship event.

Beyond the crowds, there are other things that separate Kona from all other events. Every year, triathlon royalty descends on Kona to celebrate the spirit of Ironman. Legends Dave Scott, Mark Allen, and Paula Newby-Fraser and Hall of Famers Mike Reilly and Bob Babbitt are in attendance virtually every year. Plus you have roughly 100 current pro triathletes in town to compete in the race. All of them are out and about, hosting and participating in events at local restaurants, through Ironman, at vendor booths, and at the Expo. The celebrity selfie opportunities are endless!

Speaking of the Expo, this one is like no other. You’ve got the official Expo, about a quarter-mile from the pier which houses the transition area. Nearer to the pier, you’ve got the main merchandise tent and the mini-merch tent. But then, for a solid half-mile down Ali’i Drive (the beachside road that is famous for the race’s finisher’s chute), you’ve got the “unofficial” Expo: dozens and dozens of tents from every triathlon apparent, equipment, and nutrition vendor you can think of. Some go so far as to create pop-up stores right there on Ali’i drive, and many offer limited edition Kona apparel and swag specially designed to commemorate the race. Which is all to say: if you head to Kona, bring a wad of cash and an extra duffel to accommodate all the shopping you’ll inevitably do during your trip.

Finally, as if you weren’t busy enough chasing down triathlon royalty for that coveted Instagram shot and snagging as much Kona swag as you can without tipping over into overweight baggage surcharges, you’ve also got to make time for the non-stop event schedule. There are daily swims from the Pier, so popular that they require a pop-up bag check tent for several hours each morning and include a stop at the famous coffee boat, about a half-mile off-shore from the pier. There are big-ticket events like the VIP Aloha Reception and the Evening of Champions, the ever-popular Thursday morning Underpants Run, pro meet and greet’s at sponsor tents, Bob Babbitt’s daily “Breakfast with Bob” interviews, and so so so much more.

I think this is why so many make the trip to Kona as spectators, rather than as (or in different years than as) competitors. Race week in Kona is all about soaking in the best of everything the sport has to offer and hoping to pick up just enough good juju from Madame Pele as to get to come back again another year.

Get to Know our 2018 Team Colorado Kona Athletes

ELLEN HART

*What kind of bike do you ride? Trek Speed Concept 9.9–white with multicolored stripes.

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? Qualified at Hawaii 70.3, June 2.

*How many Ironman races have you done? This will be my 13th IM.

*How many times have you raced Kona? This will be my 10th Kona IM.

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about? Walking down Alii Drive both the day before the race and the day after, and taking it all in, reflecting on the magic of race day. Other, just in case that’s too connected to the race!: going to the state park beach between town of Kona and the airport (I forget the name of it).

*What is your favorite bike training route? What else? The Queen K!

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? Chocolate shake with extra protein.

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? Unexpectedly, my foot has been injured since March, and hasn’t healed. So this will be a very different Kona for me this year, just doing the swim and bike. It is not the way I’d intended to wind up my Kona and IM chapter, but there will be different gifts that day. I will try to be alert to receive them!

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? Wouldn’t it be fun if Mirinda Carfrae and Tim O’Donnell both won!?!

Profession Triathlete Field Set for the 2018 Ironman World Championship

From IRONMAN (October 2, 2018) – Triathlon’s top professional talent will assemble at the start line in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i for the 2018 IRONMAN® World Championship brought to you by Amazon, taking place on October 13. The most iconic one-day endurance event in the world will bring together a highly regarded and competitive professional field, headlined by defending champions Patrick Lange (DEU) and Daniela Ryf (CHE).

“This is a monumental year for IRONMAN as we celebrate four decades of racing at the IRONMAN World Championship in Hawai`i,” said Andrew Messick, President & Chief Executive Officer of IRONMAN. “We look forward not only to honoring the historic professional performances from years past, but also showcasing the ever-growing international triathlete talent that will be on full display.”

The women’s professional field will seek to dethrone three-time IRONMAN World Champion Daniela Ryf (CHE), who continues to add to her impressive resume. In addition to earning her fourth IRONMAN®70.3® World Champion title this past September in South Africa, Ryf also came away with victories at the Mainova IRONMAN European Championship in Frankfurt and Enea IRONMAN 70.3 Gdynia in Poland.

Up for the challenge will be a host of strong contenders, including last year’s other podium finishers Lucy Charles (GBR) and Sarah Crowley (AUS), as well as the highly anticipated return of three-time IRONMAN World Champion, Mirinda Carfrae (AUS). Charles, who finished second a year ago, is coming off two impressive showings in Africa with a win in April’s Standard Bank IRONMAN African Championship and a second-place finish at the 2018 Isuzu IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in September. Crowley will be looking to improve upon her third-place finish from a year ago and is in good form following a win at the 2018 IRONMAN Hamburg triathlon and a third-place finish at the 2018 Mainova IRONMAN European Championship in Frankfurt. Carfrae rejoins the ranks of the elite in Kona after spending a year away for the birth of her daughter. With wins this year at IRONMAN 70.3 Santa Rosa and IRONMAN 70.3 Augusta combined with a strong second-place showing at the 2018 Cairns Airport IRONMAN Asia-Pacific Championship in Cairns, Carfrae has been at full force on her comeback trail.

The women’s field only just begins there, as other seasoned and decorated competitors join this elite group. Heather Jackson (USA) is a ten-time IRONMAN 70.3 Champion and multi-time Top 5 finisher at the IRONMAN World Championship, while Kaisa Sali (FIN) finished fifth in last year’s IRONMAN World Championship and earned first-place finishes at the 2018 IRONMAN Switzerland and 2018 Mazda IRONMAN 70.3 Monterrey triathlons. Susie Cheetham (GBR) finished second at the 2018 Standard Bank IRONMAN African Championship, just minutes after fellow British racer Lucy Charles, and joins newcomer Teresa Adam (NZL), who earned a victory at the 2018 Cairns Airport IRONMAN Asia-Pacific Championship in Cairns, as others to watch.

Below is the pro women’s start list for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon:

BIB LAST FIRST COUNTRY REP
F1 Ryf Daniela CHE (Switzerland
F2 Charles Lucy GBR (United Kingdom)
F3 Crowley Sarah AUS (Australia)
F4 Sali Kaisa FIN (Finland)
F5 Cheetham Susie GBR (United Kingdom)
F7 Jackson Heather USA (United States of America)
F8 Jahn Kirsty CAN (Canada)
F9 True Sarah USA (United States of America)
F11 Carfrae Mirinda AUS (Australia)
F12 Hufe Mareen DEU (Germany)
F14 Lester Carrie AUS (Australia)
F15 Siddall Laura GBR (United Kingdom)
F16 McCauley Jocelyn USA (United States of America)
F17 Piampiano Sarah USA (United States of America)
F18 Corbin Linsey USA (United States of America)
F19 Adam Teresa NZL (New Zealand)
F20 Vesterby Michelle DNK (Denmark)
F21 Blatchford Liz AUS (Australia)
F22 Smith Lesley USA (United States of America)
F23 Genet Manon FRA (France)
F24 Robertson Jodie USA (United States of America)
F25 Abraham Corinne GBR (United Kingdom)
F26 McBride Rachel CAN (Canada)
F27 Pallant Emma GBR (United Kingdom)
F28 Frades Gurutze ESP (Spain)
F29 Frederiksen Helle DNK (Denmark)
F30 Huetthaler Lisa AUT (Austria)
F31 Stage Nielsen Maja DNK (Denmark)
F32 Annett Jen CAN (Canada)
F33 Deckers Tine BEL (Belgium)
F34 Kessler Meredith USA (United States of America)
F35 Haug Anne DEU (Germany)
F36 Brandon Lauren USA (United States of America)
F37 Burke Melanie NZL (New Zealand)
F38 Lundstrom Asa SWE (Sweden)
F39 McKenzie Beth USA (United States of America)
F40 Konschak Katja DEU (Germany)
F41 Svensk Sara SWE (Sweden)
F42 Angela Naeth USA (United States of America

The men’s group is equally stacked with titleholders and contenders, including last year’s IRONMAN World Champion, Patrick Lange (DEU). Lange will seek his second win in Kona, where he holds a course-best time of 8:01:40 from his win in 2017, as well as the marathon run-course best time of 2:39:45, set in 2016 when he finished third. Also competing for the title is Lionel Sanders (CAN), who led the race last year through mile 23 of the marathon before giving way to Lange and ultimately earning second. Sebastian Kienle (DEU), the 2014 IRONMAN World Champion, placed fourth in the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship and will be looking for another title after just missing the podium last year. Meanwhile last year’s third-place finisher David McNamee (GBR) looks to follow the trajectory of Lange, moving from a third-place finish to becoming a world champion the following year.

Adding to the competition will be James Cunnama (ZAF), who placed fifth at the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship and Javier Gomez Noya (ESP), an Olympic silver medalist and two-time IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion. Fans will also be keeping an eye on Tim Don (GBR), who was unable to race last year after a pre-race accident left him with a broken neck just days before the event. After a grueling road to recovery, Don has made a remarkable comeback, placing first at the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Costa Rica triathlon, only eight months after the accident. Americans Andy Potts and Ben Hoffman look to rejoin the Top 5 after both finished in the Top 10 in 2018.

Below is the pro men’s start list for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon:

BIB LAST FIRST COUNTRY REP
M1 Lange Patrick DEU (Germany)
M2 Sanders Lionel CAN (Canada)
M3 Kienle Sebastian DEU (Germany)
M5 McNamee David GBR (United Kingdom)
M6 Cunnama James ZAF (South Africa)
M7 Gomez Noya Javier ESP (Spain)
M8 Nilsson Patrik SWE (Sweden)
M9 Amberger Josh AUS (Australia)
M10 Currie Braden NZL (New Zealand)
M11 Van Lierde Frederik BEL (Belgium)
M12 Tutukin Ivan RUS (Russian Federation)
M14 Potts Andy USA (United States of America)
M15 Buckingham Kyle ZAF (South Africa)
M16 Aernouts Bart BEL (Belgium)
M17 McMahon Brent CAN (Canada)
M18 Rana Ivan ESP (Spain)
M19 Wurf Cameron AUS (Australia)
M20 Van Berkel Tim AUS (Australia)
M21 Weiss Michael AUT (Austria)
M22 Amorelli Igor BRA (Brazil)
M23 Hanson Matt USA (United States of America)
M24 Skipper Joe GBR (United Kingdom)
M25 Clavel Maurice DEU (Germany)
M26 Van Berkel Jan CHE (Switzerland)
M27 Costes Antony FRA (France)
M28 Koutny Philipp CHE (Switzerland)
M29 Stein Boris DEU (Germany)
M30 Starykowicz Andrew USA (United States of America)
M31 McKenzie Luke AUS (Australia)
M32 Butterfield Tyler BMU (Bermuda)
M33 Clarke Will GBR (United Kingdom)
M34 Hoffman Ben USA (United States of America)
M35 Collington Kevin USA (United States of America)
M36 Duelsen Marc DEU (Germany)
M37 Petersen-Bach Jens DNK (Denmark)
M38 Viennot Cyril FRA (France)
M39 Phillips Mike NZL (New Zealand)
M40 Degasperi Alessandro ITA (Italy)
M41 Wild Ruedi CHE (Switzerland)
M42 Dreitz Andreas DEU (Germany)
M43 O’Donnell Tim USA (United States of America)
M44 Brown Cameron NZL (New Zealand)
M45 Guillaume Romain FRA (France)
M46 Chevrot Denis FRA (France)
M47 Vinhal Thiago BRA (Brazil)
M48 Plese David SVN (Slovenia)
M49 Chrabot Matt USA (United States of America)
M50 Molinari Giulio ITA (Italy)
M51 Reed Tim AUS (Australia)
M52 Schildknecht Ronnie CHE (Switzerland)
M53 Millward Callum NZL (New Zealand)
M54 Cochrane Simon NZL (New Zealand)
M56 Baldwin Nick SYC (Seychelles)
M57 Don Tim GBR (United Kingdom)
M58 Russell Matt USA (United States of America)

The 2018 IRONMAN World Championship will offer a $650,000 total professional prize purse which will be distributed to male and female first- through tenth-place finishers.

Get to Know our 2018 Team Colorado Kona Athletes

MATT CHRABOT (PRO)

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? I won IM Mar del Plata in Argentina last December

*How many Ironman races have you done? 6

*How many times have you raced Kona? This will be #2

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about?

*What is your favorite bike training route? Hill reps on Flagstaff Road in Boulder

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? Ice cold beer.

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? I didn’t expect PPR Team, an Italian Triathlon Team to reach out and ask me to represent them in 2018

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? Me.

TRINY WILLERTON

*What kind of bike do you ride? Argon18

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? I was granted a slot by the Ironman Foundation and Women for Tri

*How many Ironman races have you done? 7

*How many times have you raced Kona? 0

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about? We are attending several events hosted by the Ironman Foundation including a an event on Monday to give back to the community.

*What is your favorite bike training route? It has changed since my accident I know enjoy going up left hand canyon a lot.

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? I love ice cream

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? I got hit by a truck on May 8th. It has been an incredible journey of support from the community and self discovery.

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? Tim Don and Miranda Carfrae