Tri Coach Tuesday: Making Hard Workouts Easy (Or At Least Easier)

by Will Murray, D3 Multisport Mental Skills Coach

 

When your brain senses pain, it says to itself, “Bad. Make it stop.” When you are doing high-intensity workouts, your brain says, “Pain. Bad. Make it stop.” But you do hard workouts for a reason—they really, really work to make you fitter, stronger and faster.

One easy way to increase the benefit of your high-intensity workouts is to bring your brain along with you. When your brain understands the purpose of these workouts, the benefits of the workouts and what these workouts look like, this brain of yours will help you and stop trying to get you to stop.

 

Here’s how to do it.

1. **State the purpose of your workout.** If it’s a high-intensity workout intending to raise your upper limit (VO2max), state that. If it’s a recovery workout, say that.
2. **State the benefit of this workout to you.** A high-intensity workout brings you benefit by raising your lactate threshold, improving your VO2max, even recruiting mitochondria, the powerhouses of your cells. A recovery workout helps by mobilizing and clearing metabolic products from previous workouts and preparing you for future workouts.
3. **Rehearse your perfect workout.** Make a movie in your mind’s eye, seeing yourself over there, watching a movie of yourself doing your workout. This “seeing yourself over there” is called a dissociated perspective. The key is the perfect movie, just as you want and intend your workout to go. If you hit any snags, stop the movie, back it up, make it perfect, then run it to the end. You are the director of this movie—direct it to be just as you wish it to go.
4. **Rehearse your workout again**, this time seen through your own eyes and feeling it in your own skin (this is called an associated perspective). Once again, make the movie go perfectly, just as you wish it would go.
5. **Make one more perfect movie, in fast motion.** The entire movie should take only five seconds.

 

How does this work?

First, your brain is really good at seeing patterns. It looks for patterns, just as a good golden retriever looks for what you toss at it to retrieve it. So, when you explain to your brain the purpose and benefits of the workout, your brain looks for those things.

Second, there is an area of your brain that stores memories of events that haven’t happened yet (this area is called Brodmann’s Area). You can install a future memory in this area of your brain of exactly what you want to happen in your workout, and that future memory is what your brain is looking for. Therefore, it isn’t surprised by the discomfort of a hard workout, it sees it as desirable. Instead of objecting to the pain, it expects it.

That’s it. The whole five-step process, once you have practiced it two or three times, will take you less than one minute, maybe even half that. And it will recruit your brain to help you do your workout as prescribed, and once and for all eliminate all the negotiations and objections of your mind when you are doing your perfect workouts. Do this process before every single workout and before every race, and soon it will become as automatic as rinsing your swim goggles, buckling your bike helmet or lacing up your running shoes.

BRAVER BOLDER STRONGER. Triathlon workshops designed by women for women.

Join 303Triathlon‘s Bill Plock with Rachel Joyce and Dana Platin via Facebook Live from TriBella on Thursday, May 10th at 10:45am (MDT).

PRESS RELEASE – MAY 7, 2018
BRAVER BOLDER STRONGER. Triathlon workshops designed by women for women.

Boulder, Colorado USA: Rachel Joyce, professional triathlete; 2017 IRONMAN Boulder Champion, and Dana Platin, leadership coach and founder of The Warmi Project, are collaborating on an innovative local workshop series. Each workshop offers a unique blend of practical triathlon skills and mental tools designed to have an immediate benefit on performance. The series will take place at the University of Colorado, Boulder Recreation Center and single workshop registration is available:

Swim Braver Workshop: Sunday May 20 10:00am-3:00pm
Bike Bolder Workshop: Sunday June 3 10:00am-3:00pm
Run Stronger Workshop: Sunday June 24 10:00am-3:00pm

The Swim Braver session will develop the ability to squash the inner critic and lead with a BRAVER self-mentor both on and off the race course. The Bike Bolder session will progress the courage needed to push the comfort zone in order to fear less, take calculated risks, and move BOLDER through life. The Run Stronger session will explore the top three strategies to crush
goals to run STRONGER in life.

“Since transitioning from the corporate world to professional triathlon in 2005, I have learned a huge amount about swimming, biking and running,” said Rachel Joyce. “I understand how the development of everyday skills are essential to truly showcase fitness in the triathlon arena. I am excited to share my experiences through the Braver Bolder Stronger workshops and to be partnering with Dana Platin. Dana’s depth of knowledge and women’s leadership portfolio emphasizes the relevance of mental tools, which is often the missing piece of the jigsaw.”

“Human Interest Group is proud to support this engaging workshop series,” said Heather Nocickis, “Rachel and Dana have created a relevant, effective content program based on their respective paths to success. The result of their vision for women’s leadership is a blueprint that builds confidence and drives change, empowering others to break through barriers – in sport or in the corporate arena.”

“As a passionate, avid athlete, I use my participation in triathlons, cycling, and mountaineering as a way to set personal goals that push my limits beyond what I thought was possible,” says Dana Platin. “Personal triumphs and setbacks have taught me about gratitude, grit, and grace. My 20-years in leadership development, training, and program management are lessons learned for other women aspiring to crush their fear to accomplish their goals. I am thrilled to
partner with Rachel Joyce on this powerful experience that uses the journey of triathlon to tap into that braver, bolder, stronger version of ourselves.”

Each workshop will kick off with a challenging physical component. The swim/bike/run training sessions will be coached by Rachel, instructing on technique and key skills specific to triathlon, such as open water sighting and adapting swim strokes for different conditions; climbing and descending proficiency on the bike; and, finishing with a strong run in the final leg of a triathlon.

This will be followed by lunch and refreshments. Dana will advance discussion during the afternoon sessions, further examining potential barriers to empowerment and those tools and choices that contribute to success and define what braver, bolder, stronger means for women’s leadership and participation.

About Braver Bolder Stronger: Braver Bolder Stronger Workshops is a partnership between Rachel Joyce, Dana Platin and The Human Interest Group. For more details and event registration, click HERE.

Media Enquiries: The Human Interest Group
Heather Novickis email: heather@humaninterestgroup.org
Phone: 303.517.0624

Parking for Workshops
The workshops will take place at CU Student Recreation Center, located at 1855 Pleasant Street in Boulder, CO. We recommend parking at Lot 169 (free parking on weekends) or the Folsom Field Parking Garage (paid parking) as shown here.

Mark on Monday: Aero Do’s and Don’ts

by Mark Cathcart

The triathletes mantra is everything aero. We buy aero helmets, aero wheels, aero frames, wear tight clothes because they are aero, many of us even have aero drink bottles. We epitomize the Team Sky Race Director, Sir Dave Brailsfords’ now infamous “Marginal Gains”.

As I rode home the other day, I turned from CO52 onto 95th and got caught by the wind, it was blowing really hard from the west. Ahead of me were a couple of cyclists, you could see they were battling to stay upright as the wind blew across the fields and caught them square on.  Before we got to Lookout I’d passed both of them. They both could have helped themselves in the wind by being more aero.

Once on Lookout, heading east, with the wind to my back I could see another cyclist ahead, and soon doing 45MPH, I passed him too, and yes, he too could use some help even though he was going fast. So here are my bike aero do’s and don’ts.

 

 

DON’T: Ride with your elbows locked. There is almost never a good reason to ride with your elbows locked. If you do the road vibrations travel straight to your neck and upper back causing fatigue.

DO: Soften your elbows. Bending at the elbows reduces your height, and helps flatten out your back

DON’T: Ride with your palms on the brake hoods.

DO: Ride with your hands back from the hoods, soften your elbows, keep your head up

 

 

 

 

DON’T: Ride sitting up, elbows locked, just because the wind is at your back!

DO: Use your drops, or if you are comfortable, lean on your handlebars, again soften your elbows, and if you have a traditional long nose bike seat, shift forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DON’T: Let your limbs stick out. No matter which way the wind is blowing, or even if there is no wind, let your elbows and knees stick out.

DO: Soften your elbows, keep your arms tucked in, and keep your shoulders narrow.

 

 

 

 

 

DON’T: Attack hills from the bottom! There is nothing worse than “blowing-up” two thirds of the way up the hill.

DO: Pace yourself, nobody ever says I could have taken that hill faster! Use your gears wisely, don’t run out straight away.

DON’T: Battle up a hill in the same bike position.

DO: Make use of all the muscle groups. As a triathlete, you have to run off the bike. Again, traditional saddle? Slide back on the saddle, move your hand to the middle of the bars, don’t forget to soften the elbows.

 

Finally, use those gears. Remember, cycling is about motion, not muscle.

The Best Kept Swim Secret for Training and Racing

Who knew? It’s simple, lightweight AND legal… and no, it’s not a safety device…

There is a tool that not only helps execute one of the most nerve-wracking disciplines of the sport but is also lightweight, inexpensive and legal to use in any USA Triathlon Sanctioned Race in the U.S. What is this magic device?

From USA Triathlon

No one chooses triathlon it for its simplicity. With so many moving parts and countless pieces of equipment and gear, it’s easy to overlook or simply disregard an argument for one more thing to add to your seemingly endless packing list. However, there is a tool that not only helps execute one of the most nerve-wracking disciplines of the sport but is also lightweight, inexpensive and legal to use in any USA Triathlon Sanctioned Race in the U.S. What is this magic device? A snorkel.

A little-known fact is the snorkel is completely legal to use without restriction and without penalty in USA Triathlon racing events in the United States. We reached out to Certified Official Tom Reilly for full disclosure:

“Snorkels are legal equipment for use by triathletes under the USA Triathlon competitive rules. USAT rules outline what you cannot do versus what you can do. Swimming conduct is covered under Article IV in the USA Triathlon competitive rules. Nowhere under Article IV is the use of a snorkel prohibited. Note that 4.9 Illegal Equipment under Article IV, several things that cannot be used are specified during the swim. The use of a snorkel is not one of them. However, keep in mind that this applies only to events using USAT competitive rules. Others such as ITU and WTC may not allow snorkels.”

Read the full article

Intro to Foundation Training for Endurance Athletes

Boulder

 

Join a free class and information session on Foundation Training for Endurance Athletes at the APEX Hub to discover how incorporating Foundations could take your training and racing durability to the next level. APEX Certified Strength Coaches Jeff Hoobler, Joseph Cavarretta, and Cody Moore will be on site to answer any questions you may have about Foundation Training, as well as everything else APEX has to offer.

More information on Foundation Training: https://www.foundationtraining.com/about/

Class Format:
6:00pm – 6:30pm: What is Foundation Training? Why do it?
Presentation by Coach Jeff Hoobler
(Light snacks and drinks will be provided)
6:30pm – 7:15pm: Foundation Training Class at APEX Coaching
7:15pm – 7:30pm: Wrap Up Q&A

What to Bring:
Clothes you are comfortable moving around in
Pen & Notepad (optional)
Your questions!

 

Event details here

Tri Coach Tuesday: Three Workouts for Motivation in the Off Season

by Julie Dunkle, Coach with D3 Multisport

Most triathletes have a long season of training and racing and after the last big race, you hopefully took a nice break. I like my athletes to take 2-3 weeks of unstructured movement. No scheduled swim bike run in Training Peaks, no need to turn workouts green. Some of my athletes go crazy, they simply want to wake up and see Training Peaks workouts and others are so relieved to see nothing pop up. I find after a few weeks most are itching to get back to routine and this is where it can be a lot of fun.

I shy away from traditional triathlon training during these months to keep the athlete engaged and fresh. I like to address the three following areas:

1. Strength

a. This is the time to work on imbalances, test your single-legged squat, deadlift and bosu ball work and see which leg needs work, I guarantee one leg is better than the other.  Work both legs but add 20% to the “weaker” leg.

b. Get strong.   Track your squats, deadlifts and big muscle group exercise and push the max.  You will be sore (yes, sore) but this is the time of year to do that, without a long run on the schedule or hard bike sessions you can and should be sore.

c. Let the strength dictate biking and running efforts.

d. Do a Functional Movement Screening and find your weakness, imbalances.  Pay the money to get the correctional exercises and add those to your daily routine.

 

2. Address your weakness

 

Most of us want to do more in the sports where we are strong.  While that is fun, is it what you need?  This is the time to do a swim, bike or run block.  Here are a few blocks I have given athletes:

a. Swim Block:  3 weeks with a minimum of 25K per week.  I give them workouts that range from 4-7,000 and let them choose how to get to 25k.  Some will do 10k one day and take a day off, others prefer 3,500 each day, some do 2 workouts a day.  By week 2, the fatigue sets in and generally by week 3 they start to see some real gains.    We keep Strength as #2 priority and biking and running take a back seat.

b. Bike Block:  3 weeks with a goal of  200-300 miles per week depending on the athlete, their available time and weather.   I mix in a few harder efforts, which are optional based on how they are feeling, the bigger mileage is attainable when they can knock out 1-2 long rides outside.   Again, strength is #2 priority and swim and run take a back seat.

c. Run Block:  3 weeks for this block which will vary depending on the athlete, their goals, durability, and base.  The focus is 3 weeks of running 6 days a week building mileage each week. For some,  the goal may be the 30/40/50-miles week, others it may be hitting key runs 2-3 times a week and then the rest is base running.    The running carries the biggest risk of injury so be careful.

 

3. 15 hours in 3 days.  This is a fun one!

1-hour swim, 3-hour bike, 1-hour run – 3 days consecutively.    Determining if this is aerobic or has specific pace, HR, power efforts will depend on the athlete and current fitness.

 

There are many, many ways to gain fitness, have fun and be ready for race season.  These are just a few I like.   My #1 goal for the off-season is DON’T GET INJURED and #2 DON’T gain more than 5% of your bodyweight.  A few pounds are okay and likely a good idea if you race lean, but not any more. than that.

Original article here

 

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Boulder

 

Join 303Triathlon, IRONMAN Boulder and Team Colorado for these monthly training events.  Mark your calendars for the second Saturday of each month and join us for a ride, run and much more.

Watch for details on our Facebook event posts for details each month.

 

March 10:

Meet at Tom Watson Park in Boulder for a single loop ride on the June IRONMAN Boulder course.  This loop will be about 50 miles.

Wheels down at 10am

 

Event details here

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Boulder

Join 303Triathlon, IRONMAN Boulder and Team Colorado for these monthly training events.  Mark your calendars for the second Saturday of each month and join us for a ride, run and much more.

Meet at Tom Watson Park in Boulder for a single loop ride on the June IRONMAN Boulder course.  This loop will be about 50 miles.

Arrive at 8, briefing at 8:15, wheels down at 8:30

Return approx 12:30 with routes following the IM Boulder course with at least one loop, possibly two or a modified second loop. Depending on the group and how we split up we will accommodate all levels.

 

Event details here

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Boulder

 

Join 303Triathlon, IRONMAN Boulder and Team Colorado for these monthly training events.  Mark your calendars for the second Saturday of each month and join us for a ride, run and much more.

Watch for details on our Facebook event posts for details each month.

 

April 14:

Meet at Tom Watson Park in Boulder for a single loop ride on the June IRONMAN Boulder course.  This loop will be about 50 miles.

Wheels down at 9am

 

Event details here