Mark on Monday: Aero Do’s and Don’ts

by Mark Cathcart

The triathletes mantra is everything aero. We buy aero helmets, aero wheels, aero frames, wear tight clothes because they are aero, many of us even have aero drink bottles. We epitomize the Team Sky Race Director, Sir Dave Brailsfords’ now infamous “Marginal Gains”.

As I rode home the other day, I turned from CO52 onto 95th and got caught by the wind, it was blowing really hard from the west. Ahead of me were a couple of cyclists, you could see they were battling to stay upright as the wind blew across the fields and caught them square on.  Before we got to Lookout I’d passed both of them. They both could have helped themselves in the wind by being more aero.

Once on Lookout, heading east, with the wind to my back I could see another cyclist ahead, and soon doing 45MPH, I passed him too, and yes, he too could use some help even though he was going fast. So here are my bike aero do’s and don’ts.

 

 

DON’T: Ride with your elbows locked. There is almost never a good reason to ride with your elbows locked. If you do the road vibrations travel straight to your neck and upper back causing fatigue.

DO: Soften your elbows. Bending at the elbows reduces your height, and helps flatten out your back

DON’T: Ride with your palms on the brake hoods.

DO: Ride with your hands back from the hoods, soften your elbows, keep your head up

 

 

 

 

DON’T: Ride sitting up, elbows locked, just because the wind is at your back!

DO: Use your drops, or if you are comfortable, lean on your handlebars, again soften your elbows, and if you have a traditional long nose bike seat, shift forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DON’T: Let your limbs stick out. No matter which way the wind is blowing, or even if there is no wind, let your elbows and knees stick out.

DO: Soften your elbows, keep your arms tucked in, and keep your shoulders narrow.

 

 

 

 

 

DON’T: Attack hills from the bottom! There is nothing worse than “blowing-up” two thirds of the way up the hill.

DO: Pace yourself, nobody ever says I could have taken that hill faster! Use your gears wisely, don’t run out straight away.

DON’T: Battle up a hill in the same bike position.

DO: Make use of all the muscle groups. As a triathlete, you have to run off the bike. Again, traditional saddle? Slide back on the saddle, move your hand to the middle of the bars, don’t forget to soften the elbows.

 

Finally, use those gears. Remember, cycling is about motion, not muscle.

The Best Kept Swim Secret for Training and Racing

Who knew? It’s simple, lightweight AND legal… and no, it’s not a safety device…

There is a tool that not only helps execute one of the most nerve-wracking disciplines of the sport but is also lightweight, inexpensive and legal to use in any USA Triathlon Sanctioned Race in the U.S. What is this magic device?

From USA Triathlon

No one chooses triathlon it for its simplicity. With so many moving parts and countless pieces of equipment and gear, it’s easy to overlook or simply disregard an argument for one more thing to add to your seemingly endless packing list. However, there is a tool that not only helps execute one of the most nerve-wracking disciplines of the sport but is also lightweight, inexpensive and legal to use in any USA Triathlon Sanctioned Race in the U.S. What is this magic device? A snorkel.

A little-known fact is the snorkel is completely legal to use without restriction and without penalty in USA Triathlon racing events in the United States. We reached out to Certified Official Tom Reilly for full disclosure:

“Snorkels are legal equipment for use by triathletes under the USA Triathlon competitive rules. USAT rules outline what you cannot do versus what you can do. Swimming conduct is covered under Article IV in the USA Triathlon competitive rules. Nowhere under Article IV is the use of a snorkel prohibited. Note that 4.9 Illegal Equipment under Article IV, several things that cannot be used are specified during the swim. The use of a snorkel is not one of them. However, keep in mind that this applies only to events using USAT competitive rules. Others such as ITU and WTC may not allow snorkels.”

Read the full article

Intro to Foundation Training for Endurance Athletes

Boulder

 

Join a free class and information session on Foundation Training for Endurance Athletes at the APEX Hub to discover how incorporating Foundations could take your training and racing durability to the next level. APEX Certified Strength Coaches Jeff Hoobler, Joseph Cavarretta, and Cody Moore will be on site to answer any questions you may have about Foundation Training, as well as everything else APEX has to offer.

More information on Foundation Training: https://www.foundationtraining.com/about/

Class Format:
6:00pm – 6:30pm: What is Foundation Training? Why do it?
Presentation by Coach Jeff Hoobler
(Light snacks and drinks will be provided)
6:30pm – 7:15pm: Foundation Training Class at APEX Coaching
7:15pm – 7:30pm: Wrap Up Q&A

What to Bring:
Clothes you are comfortable moving around in
Pen & Notepad (optional)
Your questions!

 

Event details here

Tri Coach Tuesday: Three Workouts for Motivation in the Off Season

by Julie Dunkle, Coach with D3 Multisport

Most triathletes have a long season of training and racing and after the last big race, you hopefully took a nice break. I like my athletes to take 2-3 weeks of unstructured movement. No scheduled swim bike run in Training Peaks, no need to turn workouts green. Some of my athletes go crazy, they simply want to wake up and see Training Peaks workouts and others are so relieved to see nothing pop up. I find after a few weeks most are itching to get back to routine and this is where it can be a lot of fun.

I shy away from traditional triathlon training during these months to keep the athlete engaged and fresh. I like to address the three following areas:

1. Strength

a. This is the time to work on imbalances, test your single-legged squat, deadlift and bosu ball work and see which leg needs work, I guarantee one leg is better than the other.  Work both legs but add 20% to the “weaker” leg.

b. Get strong.   Track your squats, deadlifts and big muscle group exercise and push the max.  You will be sore (yes, sore) but this is the time of year to do that, without a long run on the schedule or hard bike sessions you can and should be sore.

c. Let the strength dictate biking and running efforts.

d. Do a Functional Movement Screening and find your weakness, imbalances.  Pay the money to get the correctional exercises and add those to your daily routine.

 

2. Address your weakness

 

Most of us want to do more in the sports where we are strong.  While that is fun, is it what you need?  This is the time to do a swim, bike or run block.  Here are a few blocks I have given athletes:

a. Swim Block:  3 weeks with a minimum of 25K per week.  I give them workouts that range from 4-7,000 and let them choose how to get to 25k.  Some will do 10k one day and take a day off, others prefer 3,500 each day, some do 2 workouts a day.  By week 2, the fatigue sets in and generally by week 3 they start to see some real gains.    We keep Strength as #2 priority and biking and running take a back seat.

b. Bike Block:  3 weeks with a goal of  200-300 miles per week depending on the athlete, their available time and weather.   I mix in a few harder efforts, which are optional based on how they are feeling, the bigger mileage is attainable when they can knock out 1-2 long rides outside.   Again, strength is #2 priority and swim and run take a back seat.

c. Run Block:  3 weeks for this block which will vary depending on the athlete, their goals, durability, and base.  The focus is 3 weeks of running 6 days a week building mileage each week. For some,  the goal may be the 30/40/50-miles week, others it may be hitting key runs 2-3 times a week and then the rest is base running.    The running carries the biggest risk of injury so be careful.

 

3. 15 hours in 3 days.  This is a fun one!

1-hour swim, 3-hour bike, 1-hour run – 3 days consecutively.    Determining if this is aerobic or has specific pace, HR, power efforts will depend on the athlete and current fitness.

 

There are many, many ways to gain fitness, have fun and be ready for race season.  These are just a few I like.   My #1 goal for the off-season is DON’T GET INJURED and #2 DON’T gain more than 5% of your bodyweight.  A few pounds are okay and likely a good idea if you race lean, but not any more. than that.

Original article here

 

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Boulder

 

Join 303Triathlon, IRONMAN Boulder and Team Colorado for these monthly training events.  Mark your calendars for the second Saturday of each month and join us for a ride, run and much more.

Watch for details on our Facebook event posts for details each month.

 

March 10:

Meet at Tom Watson Park in Boulder for a single loop ride on the June IRONMAN Boulder course.  This loop will be about 50 miles.

Wheels down at 10am

 

Event details here

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Boulder

 

Join 303Triathlon, IRONMAN Boulder and Team Colorado for these monthly training events.  Mark your calendars for the second Saturday of each month and join us for a ride, run and much more.

Watch for details on our Facebook event posts for details each month.

 

March 10:

Meet at Tom Watson Park in Boulder for a single loop ride on the June IRONMAN Boulder course.  This loop will be about 50 miles.

Wheels down at 10am

 

Event details here

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Boulder

 

Join 303Triathlon, IRONMAN Boulder and Team Colorado for these monthly training events.  Mark your calendars for the second Saturday of each month and join us for a ride, run and much more.

Watch for details on our Facebook event posts for details each month.

 

April 14:

Meet at Tom Watson Park in Boulder for a single loop ride on the June IRONMAN Boulder course.  This loop will be about 50 miles.

Wheels down at 9am

 

Event details here

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Boulder

 

Join 303Triathlon, IRONMAN Boulder and Team Colorado for these monthly training events.  Mark your calendars for the second Saturday of each month and join us for a ride, run and much more.

Watch for details on our Facebook event posts for details each month.

 

March 10:

Meet at Tom Watson Park in Boulder for a single loop ride on the June IRONMAN Boulder course.  This loop will be about 50 miles.

Wheels down at 10am

 

Event details here

Blood Flow Restriction device during training key to rapid injury recovery, anti-aging?

From LAVA

Another value is for older triathletes wanting to buffer age-related loss of lean muscle mass, in particular fast-twitch fibers that key to explosive power and speed. BFR has been described by its founder as a form of anti-aging medicine, and the research is backing the claim.

Just 40 days before the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games, Todd Lodwick, an Olympic silver medalist in 2010 and one of the USA’s top Nordic skiers, suffered a crash, breaking several ribs and trashing a rotator cuff. First impressions were that his season was over. Yet when the U.S. team marched in the opening ceremonies, Lodwick was the flag bearer, even using his injured side to carry the flag. He raced in Sochi and finished his 6th Olympic Games.

The miraculous recovery was credited to the use of two-times-day blood flow restriction training overseen by Dr. Jim Stray-Gundersen, MD, a pioneer in BFR as well as high-low altitude training. The crash happened on a Friday and to prevent the wave of atrophy that injury immobilization traditional produces, Stray-Gundersen had Lodwick performing two BFR workouts a day. They monitored Lodwick’s progress through x-rays and watched the shoulder heal.

The origins of BFR suggest that Lodwick’s recovery shouldn’t have been a surprise. Developed in Japan about 50 years ago by Dr. Yoshiaki Sato, a Japanese sports scientist, BFR came about after Sato paid attention to the muscle fatigue he felt after sitting during a long funeral. He later reverse-engineered his observation and after he broke an ankle and injured a knee skiing, he experimented with bike tubes and judo belts to restrict blood flow to the muscles while he wore a cast. When he went in to have the cast changed—a ritual procedure because casts shrink the encased muscle via atrophy—Sato’s doctors were shocked to see a ready-to-go set of leg muscles at full size. . .

Read the full article