Is running outside in all the wildfire smoke bad for you?

From 9News
By Allison Sylte

Smoke from wildfires in California and Canada is making the air tremendously hazy in Denver. Here’s what you should know if you still want to run outside.

KUSA — The best thing about running is that, unlike other things in life such as eating an entire cake, you never regret doing it once you’re finished.

But, with smoke from the wildfires out west blocking out both the sun and Colorado’s mountain views, it’s fair to wonder if it might be time to opt for an indoor workout.

The good news? Unless you have preexisting breathing problems, you likely won’t do lasting damage by getting in your run outside. That’s according to Dr. Anthony Gerber, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health.

RELATED | Thick smoke clouds the air across the Front Range Monday

“It’s pretty unlikely that a young, otherwise healthy person is going to have damage from breathing [wildfire smoke],” Gerber said.

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Weekend Preview

Triathlon Events

Saturday August 11th

 

BAM Open Water Swim

Boulder


Sunday August 12th

 

Steamboat Triathlon – SOLD OUT

Steamboat Springs


Leadville 10k

Leadville



Cycling Events

Thursday August 9th

 

BVV Thursday Night Track

Erie


Breck Epic MTB Stage Race – Day 5

Breckenridge


Friday August 9th

 

Breck Epic MTB Stage Race – Day 6

Breckenridge


Saturday August 10th

 

Pikes Peak HC & Gran Fondo

Colorado Springs


Stonewall Century Ride

Le Veta


The Mountains Revenge

Montezuma


Leadville 100 MTB Race

Leadville


Steamboat Stinger MTB Race

Steamboat Springs


Bike MS: Bighorn Country Classic

Sheridan, WY


8th Annual B Strong Ride

Boulder


Scott Enduro Cup Series: Durango

Durango


Trek Travel at Campus Cycles

Denver


Breck Epic MTB Stage Race – Day 7

Breckenridge


Powderhorn 100k – Cancelled

Mesa


Sunday August 12th

 

Darkblade systems Thunderbird Road Race

Colorado Springs


Bike MS: Bighorn Country Classic

Sheridan, WY


Scott Enduro Cup Series: Durango

Durango

Mark Plaatjes Is Getting Back in the Shoe Business

Co-founder of Boulder Running Company is getting back in the shoe game with new store

The man behind making the Boulder Running Company a popular player on the Front Range running scene is getting back into the shoe game after a four-year absence.

Photo by Marty Caivano/June 10, 2011

Mark Plaatjes, a physical therapist and former world champion in the marathon who co-founded BRC with Johnny Halberstadt in 1995, has confirmed rumors that he will open a new running store in Boulder this summer. It will be called In Motion Running.

Plaatjes’ PT practice is called In Motion Rehabilitation.

Plaatjes and Halberstadt sold the BRC stores to the Gart Companies in 2013. Plaatjes remained with BRC as an employee for a year after the sale but left the company in 2014. BRC was sold again last year.

Plaatjes this week said he misses selling shoes and the culture of running specialty stores.

“It was part of my life for 18 years,” Plaatjes said in his PT clinic Thursday. “I love the balance between physical therapy and the store. It’s totally different interactions. I miss helping people in a different way than I do here. And it was just a wonderful  way for me to be in touch with the whole running community. I miss it a lot.”

Plaatjes, a naturalized American from South Africa, won a gold medal in the marathon at the 1993 world championships. His PT clinic is on the second floor above the original BRC store on Pearl Street in Boulder. His new store will be located in Boulder at 30th and Walnut, and his PT practice will relocate there when the store opens. The target date for opening is Aug. 1.

Read the full article here.

Blind runners form a tight community

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Blind runner Amelia Dickerson, right, gets congratulated by her friend and guide Grace Dill, left, after finishing the 5 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

From the Denver Post

By Danika Worthington

About 15 participants enjoy the social nature of race

Members of the tight-knit group pumped up one another at the starting line.

Shoes were retied last minute as the national anthem played from the speakers. When it finished, the announcer asked blind and visually impaired runners to come forward.

The group made their way up. Crosby, a guide dog for runner Kerry Kuck, stood at the front of the pack. The runners prepared for their starting cue, which was a minute before the rest of the participants tackled the 5-mile route at the annual Cherry Creek Sneak.

“Crosby the dog is going to lead the way,” the announcer barked out to the crowd. Then, the start was signaled. The runners and their guides took off, breaking away down the first stretch.

The Colorado Springs based U.S. Association of Blind Athletes partnered with Achilles Denver, the local chapter of an international organization that gives athletes with disabilities a community of support, and Lending Sight, a Colorado sports club that connects those with good vision with blind or visually impaired runners, to recruit about 15 runners and guides to race Sunday.

For some, the sport is about escaping isolation or exploring freedom. For others, it is a fun form of exercise. Regardless of the motivation, the athletes all expressed a similar theme: Blind runners have a tight community in Denver.

Read the full story

From Montana and India, they became friends and training partners in Denver; Sunday they went 1-2 in Cherry Creek Sneak 10-miler

From The Denver Post

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Kailas Kokare, left, and Jordan Jones, second from right, congratulate their friend and competitor Seth Garbett, second from left, after Garbett won the 10 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. Kokare came in second and Jones came in 4th. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

A pair of unlikely training partners — one from a small town in Montana, the other from a village in India — took the first two places Sunday in the Cherry Creek Sneak 10-miler. How Seth Garbett and Kailas Kokare became friends and roommates is an even more improbable story.

Garbett, who won Sunday in 51 minutes, 55 seconds, ran for Montana State after growing up in Darby, a town of 500 near the Montana-Idaho border by the Continental Divide. Kokare, who was second in 54:14, grew up poor in the hills near Mumbai and lost his right hand when he was a year old after placing it in a fire while his mother was distracted.

They met last summer through a mutual friend. When Kokare needed a place to stay, Garbett and his wife invited him to move in with them.

Read the full article

First Sub-4-minute Miler Roger Bannister Dies

From Bleacher Report

Sir Roger Bannister, the first person to run a mile in under four minutes, has died aged 88.

As BBC Sport relayed, the Bannister family released a statement confirming the news on Sunday morning.

In it, they noted the legendary runner “died peacefully” and “surrounded by his family who were as loved by him as he was loved by them.”

Bannister etched his name into athletics history on May 6, 1954, when he completed the mile distance in a time of three minutes, 59.4 seconds in Oxford, England.

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Tyler Butterfield tackling Bermuda Marathon this weekend

From the Royal Gazette

Triathlete Tyler Butterfield will run in Bermuda Marathon Weekend as he continues his preparation for the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia, in April.

Butterfield is to return home from Boulder, Colorado, tomorrow and will be among hundreds taking part in the full marathon on Sunday — the final race of the three-day event.

The 34-year-old, whose schedule does not usually allow him to compete in the Bermuda Marathon Weekend, will also take part in the Butterfield & Vallis 5K next weekend, which marks the 100th anniversary of his family’s wholesale business.

“I’m super excited about doing a road race in Bermuda again,” Butterfield said.

“I miss doing May 24, but some years the timing works and others it doesn’t due to other races over here in the United States or internationally.

“I’m pumped to get to do a bit of Bermuda Marathon Weekend, a weekend I used to always look forward to when I lived on the island. I’m not looking at anything special from myself in the marathon; I just want to enjoy it.

“I will be racing off mostly base training and it will be one of my last long, harder runs before I switch to focus on more speed.”

Butterfield left his mark in the schools’ KPMG Front Street Mile races in the early 2000s when he set several records. His schedule will not allow him to return in time to watch those races.

“I would love to come on Thursday to watch the Front Street Mile on Friday night, but I’ve one other sponsor trip I had to do this week, today and tomorrow.”

Butterfield is also looking forward to competing in the Butterfield & Vallis race, along with brother Spencer. He will also be the guest speaker at the Bermuda Triathlon Association’s prize-giving dinner at the Loft at Flanagan’s next Saturday.

“Tickets for that are available at Raceday World, and it should be a fun night talking about modern racing, the old days of triathlon and racing with my dad Jim.

“Then the next day I will be at the Butterfield & Vallis 5k to celebrate the [company’s] 100th anniversary. It’s a perfect distance for everyone to come out and enjoy a family event.

“It’s great to be able to be home for both weekends and three great events. Bermuda always has so much going on.”

Butterfield will then turn his focus to the Commonwealth Games, where he hopes to be a part of a triathlon relay team including Flora Duffy, Tyler Smith and Erica Hawley.

“After this trip to Bermuda, it will be back to Colorado and a training camp in Arizona to start to get ready for Commonwealth Games in April,” he said.

 

Read the full article

303Radio Interviews Stryd’s Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson

303radio was in Boulder recently interviewing Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson of Stryd–the running power meter and finding out why it should be under the Christmas tree this year.

If you aren’t familiar with running with a power meter you will want to listen to this podcast to learn why running with power can help you be faster and more efficient.

 

Also, be sure to check out our full story on Stryd by Rich Soares from our Holiday Gift Guide.

Resolution Ready: The Slacker’s Guide to Creating New Habits (Like Running) and Breaking Sh*tty Ones

Longmont Uber runner Beth Risdon – author of the famous “Shut Up And Run” blog has this advice for starting – and cementing – new healthy habits. Remember, KISS.

My son, Sam, was home from college for the weekend. He likes to come home because he misses me so much. Or, maybe it’s because I feed him and provide him with a bed that has clean sheets (I think he told me has not yet changed his sheets on his college bed – I mean, it has only been three months since he got there so it’s not like they’re dirty or anything. It’s not like there’s B.O. and pieces of skin and drool all over them or anything).

Anyhow, I asked him if he was working out anymore. He used to go to the gym pretty regularly. He said, “No. It’s just so hard to get over the hump mentally to get started again.” And, I completely know what he means. The thing is, that’s precisely why I never take a significant break from running or exercise. Because I’m afraid if I’m gone too long and I get out of the habit, it will be that much harder to start up again.

What I’ve learned is that there are two things in life that are really tough (well, there are many more, but these are just two of them): breaking bad habits and starting new, healthier habits.

Take drinking wine, for example. I am very much in the habit of nightly wine drinking, for better or for worse. I know it’s become a habit – a way I reward myself. A glass while I cook dinner. A glass to accompany me when I watch “This Is Us” (although I probably get even more emotionally manipulated by that show when I’m drinking). I know I could stop my nightly drinking (but why would I want to?), but it’s the breaking of the habit that is so hard.

If you’re old enough, you remember that we didn’t used to wear seat belts. Like, not ever. Then it became the law and the norm that you had to wear a seat belt. Buzz kill. There go all of the cross country road trips where we would lay down in the back of the station wagon on the old plaid blanket from the garage. Anyway, at first putting on a seat belt was such a pain in the ass. You had to make a conscious effort to do and you felt so restricted. But, now that it has become a habit? I do it so automatically I don’t even know I do it. Bingo! That’s the point of this post!

Running has become that way for me. Just part of my life and my routine. Kind of like drinking wine and brushing my teeth (not at the same time). I don’t run everyday, but I do run about five days a week and don’t feel like myself if I don’t do it.

So, how do you create a new habit or break a bad one? (I’m going to use the example of someone who wants to start drinking more water every day because their pee should be the color of Crystal Light Lemonade and it looks like Guinness, but you could apply this to running more, drinking less wine, cutting back on coffee or not eating sweets). I call this the “The Slacker’s Guide” because it doesn’t require a ton of imagination or creativity. Even your college kid can do it….

Click here  to read the five key steps to making a new habit stick.

303Radio Interviews Bryan Williams – from newbie Runner to Ultra Runner

Bryan Williams – Having completed his first marathon 7 years ago, At 42 years old, Bryan Williams set out to complete the 490 mile Colorado Trail Run. Bryan took inspiration from Scott Jaime and worked with coach Cindy Stonesmith to prepare for this epic adventure that would take him over 13,000 foot passes and often getting only a couple hours of sleep each night. Bryan has the Fastest Known Time (FKT) of 8 days and 30 minutes.