IRONMAN Boulder and IRONMAN Boulder 70.3 Is Here to Stay Through 2020

Having IRONMAN Boulder withdrawals? Well, we have good news to share! Clear out and make room in your race calendar for the next couple of years!

IRONMAN BOULDER AND IRONMAN 70.3 BOULDER EXTENDED THROUGH 2020

Boulder to continue to host exceptional race experience for an additional two years

TAMPA, Fla./BOULDER, Colo. (June 6, 2018) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, in partnership with the City of Boulder and the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau, have agreed to extend their partnership with the continuation of the IRONMAN® Boulder and IRONMAN 70.3® Boulder triathlons through 2020.

“Boulder is a city that provides a tremendous amount of support to the triathlon community while embracing the IRONMAN spirit,” said Tim Brosious, Race Director for IRONMAN Boulder. “We are thrilled to continue our partnership through 2020 and grow the rich culture that the sport has instilled in Boulder. We are looking forward to this weekend’s race as we continue IRONMAN events in this area.”

Located at the foot of the Flatiron Mountains, Boulder provides a central vacationing and training location for triathletes. The city’s health-conscious culture, refreshing weather and picturesque Colorado mountain views provide a sensational venue for athletes and spectators.

“We have been a proud sponsor of IRONMAN Boulder for five years,” said Tom McGann, Chair of the Board of Directors of the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Our working relationship with IRONMAN and the City of Boulder have only strengthened and grown during this time, and we are happy to announce the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau has committed to continuing our sponsorship of this event for 2019-2020”.

The 2018 IRONMAN Boulder will take place on June 10, 2018, while the IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder will be held on August 4, 2018. Over 4,000 athletes are registered for the 2018 events and approximately 20,000 spectators are expected to attend the races. A dedicated team of over 2,500 volunteers helps to make the event successful. The IRONMAN Foundation will distribute $60,000 in charitable giveback to non-profit initiatives and groups in the Boulder region in 2018.

“The City of Boulder is excited to continue to host both IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events over the coming years,” added Michael Eubank, Special Events Manager from the City of Boulder. “We look forward to what’s in store with this established partnership that brings race participants and our community together.”

Since first debuting in 2014, IRONMAN Boulder has become a staple in the IRONMAN race circuit. The race begins with a one-loop, 2.4-mile swim in the Boulder Reservoir, followed by a multi-loop, 112-mile bike course contained within Boulder County, featuring several pronounced climbs. Athletes then embark on a 26.2-mile marathon run from the Boulder Reservoir through residential neighborhoods to downtown Boulder and onto the Boulder Creek Trail, winding along the creek and through city parks. The finish line is on Pearl Street located in the heart of downtown Boulder.

IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder also provides athletes with a scenic and challenging course. Participants begin their journey with a 1.2-mile swim in the Boulder Reservoir, followed by a fast and flowing 56-mile single loop bike course through north Boulder County. The two-loop, 13.1-mile run course begins and ends at the Boulder Reservoir.

For more information, please visit www.ironman.com/boulder for the IRONMAN event and www.ironman.com/boulder 70.3 for the IRONMAN 70.3 event. Athlete inquiries may be directed to boulder@ironman.com and boulder70.3@ironman.com. For media inquiries, please email press@ironman.com.

Criterium 101: Presented by ALP CYCLES RACING

Boulder

 

Want to try bike racing and don’t know where to start? Already racing and want to learn how to be more efficient? Want to hang out with some really cool women and have fun on bikes? Then this clinic is for you!

USA Cycling certified coaches, Alison Powers (2014 National Criterium Champion), Patricia Schwager and Jennifer Sharp (Current Colorado State Criterium Champion) will teach you what you need to know to race your first criterium. Specifically, we’ll be discussing cornering in a
group, sprinting, race tactics, safety and have a couple of practice races.

Event details and registration here

303Radio Interviews Chris McDonald of Big Sexy Racing – headed to Kona for the 8th time

By Rich Soares

Chris McDonald of Big Sexy Racing is heading to the Ironman World Championship in Kailua Kona for the 8th time this year.

I had a chance to talk with Chris and Brandt Beal about the partnership between Big Sexy Racing and Indur, a results-based health system that launched earlier this year.

“Indur is a wellness from the inside-out platform,” as Brandt explains. Indur analyzes a comprehensive blood panel and then uses their proprietary robust analytical tool to provide customized advice and give individuals customized plans for improving their health. “For athletes, we’re looking to optimize the performance that they can get out of their body.”

Indur tests give athletes insights into how to improve their metabolism, boost energy, sleep better, build muscle and more. Indur helps individuals transform themselves from a health perspective and the partnership with Chris “really made sense for us at Indur.”

Prior to becoming a professional triathlete, Chris explains, “I was a 260-pound construction working in New Zealand eating pies and sausage rolls.” Inspired by his brother, Chris jumped into triathlon and was encouraged by the transformation that took place over the course of six Ironman races as an amateur.

Now as a professional Chris’outlook has evolved. “Performance is something that I depend on for my livelihood. I’m looking for a 1% advantage over my competition. if I can get a ¼ % edge on my electrolytes, sleep and recovery, it all adds up.”

With his Indur partnership in place, Chris heads to Kona with confidence that his body is dialed in. “This year’s approach to Kona is about keeping normality as close to the race as possible.” He’s learned over time how to acclimate to the heat with specific heat protocols while living and training in Colorado.

Go Big Sexy!

Rich Soares, 303Triathlon

Mark on Monday: Face Your Fears

By Mark Cathcart

A discussion about dealing with events, challenges, unexpected problems, and most importantly, those challenges life throws at you during the race season.

When I first agreed the schedule of articles with Dana for my 303 Column, Face your fears seemed like a good end of season challenge, little did I know what challenges would lay ahead of me.

In terms of fears, no matter what you are afraid of, someone else is probably more afraid but will get over it. That’s what makes a champion, looking fear in the “eyes” and fbeating it. That’s your challenge, take something triathlon or sport related that is really different, something you didn’t think you could do, something you were afraid of and do it!

For me this year it will be very different, after 18-years of triathlon, I’m planning to make the start line at the Without Limits Oktoberfest Triathlon. Last time I was at the Union Reservoir for the Outdoor Divas triathlon, to support my partner Kate in her race, I had a full-blown heart attack and was taken away post-race in an Ambulance (3).

I’ve seen people take on and achieve much bigger challenges. A club colleague of mine in the UK, was training for Team GB, when she was hit and paralyzed from the waist down. Just a year later, Paula Craig was the first Team GB Para-triathlete at the ITU Worlds in Cancun in 2002. You don’t have to look far to see incredible stories. I was amazed to see the progress that BBSC Endurance Sports Craig Towler had already made after losing both his legs after being hit by a driver while out training. (1).

I’ve stood at the start line for many races, both open water, with high waves, and frenetic pool based triathlons and heard people expressing grave concerns about their ability to start, much less finish.

To this day I can remember a race in the UK in 2006, pool swim, all the competitors lined up down the side of the pool waiting for the start. The pool was crazy, arms thrashing everywhere, there were as many as 6-people per lane, the noise was crazy, there were almost waves as the water crashed against the sides.

The guy next to me was, like me, 6ft tall, and he was having serious doubts about the swim. I told him it would be fine. He wasn’t convinced. I pointed out that while racking my bike I’d spotted a prosthetic arm in transition. He looked puzzled. We scanned the line of swimmers and couldn’t see the “owner”. It turned out to be the first ever triathlon for Claire Cunningham (nee Bishop). Claire is a medal winning and Champion paratriathlete for Team GB now and just 5’6” tall.

How must Claire have felt that day?

There is nothing special about these athletes. They don’t have a superpower, they take the challenges and setbacks and find a way of getting past them.

Most of us don’t face triathlon with anything like those challenges. Whatever you decide to do over the next few months, tackle something that challenges you, something that proves you are still alive. No matter if that is taking on a greater distance than you thought possible; going faster and placing higher than you think you can; getting out and becoming the hill climber; the cyclocross athlete and more.

Each of these “fears” can be broken down and divided into constituent parts; each of those parts you can find a way to address. As Claire says on her website “Nothing is impossible, you can find a way”. (*2) Create goals for each part, after you’ve achieved those goals, start combining the parts and setting new goals.

Look for help from coaches, books and videos. With not much of a racing season left, why not pick a fear and set about facing it before next season?

Me, I’ll be working the mount/dismount line for the upcoming 5430 Harvest Moon race, and then I’ll be doing everything I can to start, and finish the Oktoberfest triathlon in a few weeks.

  1. https://www.rhone.com/blogs/collective/my-story-by-craig-towler
  2. http://clare-cunningham.co.uk/about-me/
  3. I can’t thank Gaby and the EMT’s at Rapid Response Paramedic Services, the Mountain View Fire emergency crew, especially Carlos who, coincidentally volunteered with me at Ironman Bouler 2016; Dr Paik and everyone at Longmont Unit Hospital enough. Really!
Mark Cathcart took up triathlon in the late 90’s to get fit for adventure racing, which to this day he has never done, and has since taken part in 170+ events. His pragmatic approach to training, racing, and life have lead in from being the Chairman of one of the bigger UK Triathlon clubs 15-years ago; British Triathlon volunteer of the year; a sometime race organizer; The organizer and ride leader for Austin Texas award winning Jack and Adams triathlon shop; doing sometime Sports Management for development and professional triathletes; he has attended all the Triathlon Business International, and Triathlon America conferences, where he usually asks the questions others won’t; moved to Colorado in 2016 and is a co-owner of Boulder Bodyworker

How to Recover like a Pro

From Boulder Sports Clinic

As an athlete of any kind, we are always pushing the limits of our body. Workouts break us down. In order to reach the finish line of our next race we need our body to adapt to the stress of training.

Have you ever been sore after a workout? Of course! That soreness is a sign that you’ve successfully broken down muscle tissue during your activity that is required to become better, faster, and stronger.

We frequently read about the latest training recommendations in the world, which claim to shape you into a better athlete: training supplements, nutritional fads, ice baths, muscle rubs, compression garments, and stretching……

 

What is the optimal recovery routine? To answer that question we sat down with top American professional triathlete Justin Metzler.

In addition to year-round training, Justin raced twelve 70.3s, or half Ironman distance triathlons last year on five continents with multiple podium finishes. This level of consistent racing requires massive weekly hours of swimming, biking, and running with many of those days having multiple training sessions. In order to recover from one session enough to hit the next just as hard, he has dialed in the most effective recovery tools-and he is sharing his secrets with us.

How do you recover from a typical training session?

Immediately following a training session or race I have a recovery drink. Regardless of the type of session or which sport, any type of workout will break down muscle and deplete glycogen stores. My immediate goal is to replenish the glycogen and supply my body with the amino acids it needs to rebuild the muscle I just broke down. After trying a lot of different flavors and brands, I prefer First Endurance Ultragen. It has the optimal balance of carbohydrate to protein in addition to a number of essential vitamins and minerals to help rebuild for the next session. Not to mention, it tastes great!

When I can, I tend to structure the training to have enough down time in between the workouts to allow me to relax, put my feet up, and grab some food. In between sessions I am primarily focusing on foods high in protein and nutrient density. Some examples include lean meats, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables.

What is a typical routine after your training is completely done for the day?

After the training is done I try to relax, answer emails, talk with my nutrition and coaching clients, and make a healthful dinner with my girlfriend- fellow professional triathlete, Jeanni Seymour. Just like everyone else, our day-to-day is quite busy and we often are out training from dawn to dusk. But we always try to make dinner a time that we can cook together, eat together and catch up on the days activities. Once or twice a week, we have a glass of red wine to help relax!

Before bed, I always try to use my Normatec boots for somewhere between 30-60 minutes. On harder days I go for less time at a softer setting. On easier days I bump up the intensity and sit in them for a bit longer. The boots are a great tool to aid in recovery but I try not to disrupt my body’s natural recovery process.

I always have some form of protein before bed. Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, or whey protein are my ‘go-to’s. The protein helps give my body what it needs recover over night, the time when the majority of your recovery gains will be made. People often overlook the fact that your ability to improve is dictated by your ability to absorb training load. So recovery is equally important to any hard training session that you may do.

How much sleep do you get each night?

As I mentioned, sleep is a big priority for me. I have spent the money necessary to have a great mattress, sound machine, ear plugs, etc in order to try to get the most quality sleep I can every night. I aim to get 8-10 hours a night, and I don’t usually nap unless I fail to get my normal amount of sleep.

Do you have recovery days built into your training plan?

My training is structured to have some days of active recovery. On recovery days, I use the lighter workouts as a warm up for any foam rolling, stretching, or rehab exercises I may need to focus on. I also try to schedule chiropractic and massage appointments every week to help address any small issues before they become something I actually have to worry about.

Do you take any supplements?

The only supplements I take are fish oil (I like the KLEAN or Zone Labs brands) and a multivitamin (First Endurance multi-v is my favorite). As a professional who gets drug tested regularly, I watch what I consume carefully. I find that with a proper healthful diet, most people don’t need many supplements. Shoot for a minimum of four fruits and four vegetables every day.

What is the one piece of advice you would give to any runner or triathlete about recovery?

Nail your nutrition. You should have just as much importance placed on fueling correctly as you do building a training schedule. The worst thing to happen to any endurance athlete in a race is hitting the wall and having to slow down or get the dreaded DNF.

In every workout you use stored glycogen for fuel. If you deplete the glycogen stores you hit the wall. To fully come back from depleting your stores, it takes days or weeks. This means your next workouts suffer or you’re not able to complete them.

The key is to never let your glycogen stores get too low. Think of it like the fuel gage on your car. Try to never let it dip below 25-50% capacity.

I try to have a form of carbohydrates every 30 minutes during a workout. A gel, half a bar, banana, or sports drink, helps to make sure my “fuel tank” never falls below the level I am shooting for.

How does Boulder Sports Chiropractic help you?

It is so important to stay on top of injury risk. My body is my livelihood and if I’m injured, I can’t race! Getting weekly treatments to focus on any tightness I may have from shoulder pain to calf tightness keeps me from having any injury set backs. I love the Active Release Technique and dry needling. In addition to massage and rehab; chiropractic care and the modalities Boulder Sports Chiropractic rely on are a critical part to my body work protocol.

More about Justin…

In addition to professional triathlon, Justin has a degree in human physiology and nutrition. He has a unique set of skills developed through hours in the classroom paired with 10 years of multisport experience. When he is not training, he helps athletes like you build customized nutrition plans to address any weakness in training, racing or general body composition.

Services Justin offers: one-on-one monthly coaching, race specific training plans, race nutrition strategies, race weight planning, daily nutrition strategies for optimal body composition and general nutrition guidelines.

If you feel like you could benefit from building a proper nutrition plan for training/racing, or to learn more about the services that Justin offers, contact him at:

Contact Justin

At Boulder Sports Chiropractic, we use movement screens to biomechanically evaluate how your whole body is moving and how it works together.We use the best techniques to address your source of pain and dysfunction including Active Release Technique, Graston, and Dry Needling.

We send every patient home with the rehab exercises or stretches to give you the tools to fix the problem, not just treat the symptoms! Contact us today to schedule your appointment.

Cuba Triathlon Preview

Ten local athletes will travel to Havana, Cuba this week to take part in the Habana Triathlon; 6 of them from Team IPA Endurance. “We are excited to see our athletes participate and experience Cuba and supporting the Cuban athletic scene” said IPA Endurance Co-Founder Bill Garrels. “Team members will participate in either a Sprint or 70.3 race. This is going to be as much a cultural experience as it is a ‘race’ in Cuba. IPA Endurance athletes will be great representatives for the US and the state of Colorado spreading the vibe of helping each other have a great race experience in Cuba.”

The team is also taking donations of wetsuits, goggles, water bottles, etc. to donate to local Cuban triathletes. “This act of International Sports Diplomacy is wonderful … and important.” says Barry Siff, President USAT.

This week brought an unexpected surprise in the form of a bike box embargo from Southwest. Luckily, Chuck Ankeny from local bike shop, Freedom Bikes, stepped in with a loan of Brompton folding bikes. In typical IPA fashion, the athletes are embracing this unexpected challenge. “This race is more about meeting new people and experiencing a different culture, than chasing PRs,” says Donna Shaw.

Racing Burnout and Mid Winter Blues

By 303 Ambassador Marty Rosenthal

I am often asked, “Aren’t you going to burn out?” “Don’t you need a break?” “How can you enter 2 or 3 full distance Ironman races in a year? I need to take a year off after each race.” My reply is typically No, No and it’s easy….

Truthfully, I think it is all a mindset and how one goes about their training and racing. Quite simply, I love it! I love to train and I love to race. I enjoy the comradery. I like staying healthy and fit. I am humbled by the challenges and obstacles that many have overcome to just make it to the starting line of any race, let along a full distance triathlon. I am in awe and inspired by the thousands of people that stand besides me at that starting line.
I believe that people shouldn’t race, if they don’t love it. Why put yourself and your family through months or years of stress and training if you don’t truly love it and desire to be a part of it? Why get monkey butt for hour upon hour of riding unless you love taking it all in and feeling alive. I could not image enduring anything for 10+ hours let alone 2 hours if I didn’t find enjoyment and satisfaction in what I am doing. There is no medal they could give me after crossing a finish line that would be worth it, if I didn’t relish in taking flight and flying to finish with a smile on my face.

Training and racing are times for us to truly be free and experience life and explore our minds our souls and wonderful regions of this world we might not otherwise get the opportunity to experience. This is why for the 3 years that I have been racing, I’ve done it non-stop and toed the line for 7 Ironman races and a countless number of sprints, Olympic distances and half ironman races.

Mindset is not the only way to keep the mid winter blues from destroying your training. I like to mix things up. So besides
just doing triathlons, adding cross training into my routine, is extremely helpful and an essence of me staying fit and having fun. Hitting the slopes, snowshoeing, going to the rock climbing gym, trail running are just a few ways in which I like to stay active in the winter. Another favorite activity for me to do is to enter in ½ marathons in warmer climate cities and plan a great 3 day weekend with my wife. It gives us some great quality time to share together. Visit a city we may not have been to before. Forget about PR’s and racing and age grouping and just enjoy being with one another and having fun running together. Screaming for more cowbell, flying to the finish and sharing Bloody Marys afterwards.

 

Two IRONMAN Wisconsin Cyclists Hit by Cars

IRONMAN Wisconsin finish line
Photo from original article at http://nbc15.com

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) — Ironman Athletes can expect big obstacles, but not many expect a car to get in the way.

“We’ve been doing the Ironman Wisconsin here for many years generally it goes off without any sort of incident,” said Captain Jeffrey Teuscher with Dane County Sheriff’s Office.

But after two cyclists were struck by cars in yesterday’s race, some local cyclists are worried.

“it is scary because its a serious reminder how crashes can be detrimental especially during a big race,” said Zachary Barnes with Wisconsin Bike Federation.

The two accidents happened along the course in Fitchburg and just outside Madison in Pine Bluff.

“We had a section of bicyclists that were trying to go through and the driver went through at the same time of the bicyclists,” said Teuscher.

Read the full article.

An athlete participating in IRONMAN Boulder was hit by a vehicle and killed earlier this year.

Your Next Triathlon: What’s your “Why?”

nicoleBy Nicole Odell

When you plan your race or event season, do you ever sit down to think about why you are doing a race or event?

Often we might think, well, I’m doing a half ironman because it’ll help me get ready for a full-distance race. But the why should be a bit deeper than that.

And I think all athletes at some point in a race, especially when things get a little rough, think, “Why am I doing this?” Having a why will let you answer that quickly so you can get back to focusing on what you are doing.

Every race on your calendar has a purpose, a WHY. The WHYs will vary, but when you go to bed the night before a race, and wake up in race morning, the WHY will put your efforts into perspective.

Let’s look at some common WHYs.

It’s a “training race.”

But why is a training race? What are you training for? What aspects of the event are you testing out? The WHY should be specific: I am doing this race to test out my nutrition plan in a race situation for my A-race. Or: I am doing this race to push hard and work on my ability to work in a group.

It’s a bucket list item.

I am doing this race because I’ve always wanted to and it will be a great accomplishment.

To honor others.

I am doing this race to bring awareness to those who no longer can. Having that additional motivation beyond just finishing can often push you when things get tough.

To win or go for a personal best.

No doubt, this is a WHY for many athletes. If you are a professional athlete, winning gets you your paycheck. If you are an amateur, you might be trying to collect points or qualify for a championship race. But as most of us don’t win, we’re aiming for a personal best. I am doing this race to push my limits as an athlete.

Because I love the sport.

Hopefully this WHY is in all your races or events.

Can you have multiple WHYs? Absolutely. One will likely be your main focus, but other WHYs can help motivate and drive you as well. No matter the level of event, local fun run 5k, IRONMAN triathlon, or charity ride, there is a WHY.

Know the real reason why you have a race on your calendar and you’ll be more motivated for your training, and come race day, knowing that WHY will help you achieve your best.

Read Nicole’s Blog