Oktoberfest 2018: A Blast of a Season Closer

by Rich Soares

The Oktoberfest Triathlon has earned a reputation of being the “don’t miss the fun” race of the season.

 

Officially the last local triathlon race of the season, more than 700 athletes come from around the country to say goodbye to the summer triathlon race season by letting their fun flag fly! Oktoberfest featured sprint, relay team and collegiate division races including draft legal and non-draft races from twelve Universities.

 

Sunday’s race began with the draft legal men’s and women’s races. The men’s division had ten athletes representing five universities, including Colorado Mesa, CU Boulder, Utah, Wyoming and Colorado State. The women’s NCAA division had 49 athletes representing twelve universities, including Arizona State, Black Hills State, Colorado Mesa, Colorado State, Daemen College, Northern Vermont University, United States Air Force Academy, University of California Berkeley, CU Boulder, South Dakota, Utah and Wagner College. The non-draft collegiate competition followed with 98 athletes (50 women and 48 men) representing Colorado School of Mines, CSU, CU Boulder, Wyoming, and USAFA. Sprint triathlon and team relay waves followed the collegiate start with 415 athletes in the triathlon and 30 relay teams.

Clear skies and mild temperatures made for perfect conditions at Union Reservoir in Longmont. The course started with a 750-meter square left-hand swim course around four neon yellow buoys. The water was calm and temperatures were in the low-mid 70’s making it reasonably comfortable for those who did not care to swim in wetsuits. The 13-mile bike course led riders out of the reservoir north on County Rd 1, east on Route 66, south on County Road 7 and back east on 119. All intersections were well controlled and large sections of the course were coned off in high traffic areas to provide the riders separation from automobiles. The run course led athletes through the race village past the vendor and club tents, spurring energy and excitement for spectators and athletes alike. Runners donned costumes adding to the “let your fun flag fly” vibe. Costumed or not, the runners headed on to the gravel out-and-back course with an energetic aid station located a mile from the race village. The finish line was lined
with spectator cheering and partying to the beat of race music.

After the race, athletes enjoyed good music and great food catered by Wahoos. The post-race party was capped off with the awards ceremony recognizing the serious competition of more than 700 athletes.

The collegiate competitions posted fast times. Nick Dorsett took out the men’s draft legal race with a time of 00:58:10, while Hannah Henry from ASU bested the rest of the NCAA women with a time of 1:00:04. In the non-draft collegiate race Jack Toland from CU Boulder won the men’s competition with a 00:56:28 and Kelly Grier of USAFA won the women’s with 1:09:58. In the age grouper sprint race 49 year old Kevin Konczak from Boulder won the overall with at time of 59 minutes even and 29 year old Caitlan Standifer of Boulder was the overall winner for women with a 1:05:39.

Complete results here

Thanks to Lance Panigutti, the entire Without Limits Productions crew and volunteers for putting on a fantastic 2018 season. I’m already looking forward to 2019!

Solstice Sunset OWS

Longmont

 

The Solstice Sunset Swim is a swim created in cooperation with the Longmont Kinetics Festival.  Participants have the opportunity to swim either a 1.2 mile race or a 2.4 mile race.  Awards will be given out to the top three finishers in each division for each race.  Divisions will be both non-wetsuit and wetsuit for both men and women for each race.  Following the race, there will be a bonfire on the lake. Before the event there is the festival.

 

1.2 and 2.4 mile events

 

Event details and registration here

38th Annual Longmont Triathlon

Longmont

 

A Brief History of the Longmont Triathlon

In 1981, the first Longmont Triathlon started with 56 participants.

The event was held as 3 separate events. The run was a 10K that started at 9am, the 25 mile bike race started at noon and the 1000 meter swim began at 3pm – truly an all day event! There were no transition times, but the times for all three individual events were added together to determine the winner. Overall winners that year were Patti McNitt and Dennis Wilson, both in the 20-29 age category. The cost for the race, which included a 50/50 t-shirt and refreshments, was $12. The oldest age group offered was 40 and over.

This format continued for one more year with the bike changing from 25 miles to 19 in the second year. In subsequent years, the race was combined so all events were consecutive. In addition, the course has seen numerous changes most dictated by road construction and the growth of Longmont on the East side of town.

The Longmont Triathlon is becoming a historic event in Longmont and, with a 7-0 vote in 2014, the Longmont City Council unanimously supported continuing the tradition.

 

Event details and registration here

Resolution Ready: The Slacker’s Guide to Creating New Habits (Like Running) and Breaking Sh*tty Ones

Longmont Uber runner Beth Risdon – author of the famous “Shut Up And Run” blog has this advice for starting – and cementing – new healthy habits. Remember, KISS.

My son, Sam, was home from college for the weekend. He likes to come home because he misses me so much. Or, maybe it’s because I feed him and provide him with a bed that has clean sheets (I think he told me has not yet changed his sheets on his college bed – I mean, it has only been three months since he got there so it’s not like they’re dirty or anything. It’s not like there’s B.O. and pieces of skin and drool all over them or anything).

Anyhow, I asked him if he was working out anymore. He used to go to the gym pretty regularly. He said, “No. It’s just so hard to get over the hump mentally to get started again.” And, I completely know what he means. The thing is, that’s precisely why I never take a significant break from running or exercise. Because I’m afraid if I’m gone too long and I get out of the habit, it will be that much harder to start up again.

What I’ve learned is that there are two things in life that are really tough (well, there are many more, but these are just two of them): breaking bad habits and starting new, healthier habits.

Take drinking wine, for example. I am very much in the habit of nightly wine drinking, for better or for worse. I know it’s become a habit – a way I reward myself. A glass while I cook dinner. A glass to accompany me when I watch “This Is Us” (although I probably get even more emotionally manipulated by that show when I’m drinking). I know I could stop my nightly drinking (but why would I want to?), but it’s the breaking of the habit that is so hard.

If you’re old enough, you remember that we didn’t used to wear seat belts. Like, not ever. Then it became the law and the norm that you had to wear a seat belt. Buzz kill. There go all of the cross country road trips where we would lay down in the back of the station wagon on the old plaid blanket from the garage. Anyway, at first putting on a seat belt was such a pain in the ass. You had to make a conscious effort to do and you felt so restricted. But, now that it has become a habit? I do it so automatically I don’t even know I do it. Bingo! That’s the point of this post!

Running has become that way for me. Just part of my life and my routine. Kind of like drinking wine and brushing my teeth (not at the same time). I don’t run everyday, but I do run about five days a week and don’t feel like myself if I don’t do it.

So, how do you create a new habit or break a bad one? (I’m going to use the example of someone who wants to start drinking more water every day because their pee should be the color of Crystal Light Lemonade and it looks like Guinness, but you could apply this to running more, drinking less wine, cutting back on coffee or not eating sweets). I call this the “The Slacker’s Guide” because it doesn’t require a ton of imagination or creativity. Even your college kid can do it….

Click here  to read the five key steps to making a new habit stick.

Most likeable guy in triathlon? Longmont’s Tyler Butterfield talks with 303Radio about KONA

303Radio‘s Bill Plock interviewed Tyler Butterfield – one of the most likeable guys in pro triathlon. From his youth in Bermuda to his new hobby farm in Longmont, the guy is nothing but friendly from all angles. He has huge respect for his fellow competitors, is humble in his accomplishments, entirely devoted to his family, grateful to his parents and sponsors, and remembers every name his 6-year-old daughter gave to their herd of adorable pet goats (with a seemingly princess theme)… Headed to #Kona, he just might land on the podium again. We’ll be watching and cheering for sure.  (Photo by Bill Plock)

 

Longmont Business tells Ironman 70.3 Boulder to “Go To Hell” in very public manner

Raul Bustamante. co-owner of United Wood Products Inc. along the Diagonal Highway, hung this sign on his truck to protest the limited access to his business during the Ironman 70.3 race on Saturday. (Courtesy photo)

From the Daily Camera

The co-owner of a Longmont wood processing yard told the Ironman 70.3 to go to hell this weekend — in big, red letters.

Raul Bustamante is the co-owner of United Wood Products Inc. along the Diagonal Highway between Airport Road and Niwot Road. Bustamante grew frustrated last year when use of the highway for the Ironman 70.3 half-triathlon made access to his business appear nearly impossible.

This year, Bustamante reached out to local law enforcement asking whether a sign could be put out letting passersby know local businesses along the road would still be open during the race. After chatting with the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office and Colorado State Patrol, Bustamante felt reassured that this would be a simple fix.

But when he called to double check with Ironman race organizers that everything was set, his frustrations ballooned.

Read the full story

Silver Creek HS Raptor Run 5k

Longmont

 

Be a part of this great inaugural event.

Come out and support one of Longmont’s great high school communities.  The Raptor Run is a fun, family friendly course in south Longmont.  The course runs on neighborhood streets never crossing a significant road!

 

All proceeds will fund the Raptor Athletic Booster Club (RABC) which provides additional funding for student athletic program needs, After Prom events, Homecoming as well as grants for student projects and other facility need.

 

Event details and registration here

Longmont Try-a-Tri

Are you new to the sport of Triathlon, recovering from injuries, just getting into shape, learning how to swim, bike, and run (all together or learning a new skill), and a full sprint distance triathlon would be a bit too much? Then, the Longmont Try-a-Tri (super-sprint triathlon distance) is the right Triathlon for you to take on!

The Longmont Try-a-Tri is not about what place you finish in, it is about having fun while finishing a TRIATHLON!

Distances:

  • Swim – 200 yards
  • Bike – 4.5 miles – 3x around the bike course
  • Run – 2K (1.2 miles) – an out and back course on the side walk and bike path