IRONMAN Arizona

Tempe, Az

The inaugural IRONMAN Arizona was held on April 9, 2005, in cooperation with the City of Tempe and the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community. With its fast course around Tempe Beach Park and Tempe Town Lake, and spectator-friendly atmosphere, the race quickly gained popularity. Given the desert heat, the race was moved to a much cooler November race date in 2008, where it attracts a wide range of triathletes who’ve had the whole summer to train.

IRONMAN Arizona kicks off with a single-loop swim in Tempe Town Lake, followed by a challenging three-loop bike course through the Sonoran Desert. It finishes with a spectator-friendly run around Tempe Town Lake and Papago Park.

The course will remain a one-loop swim and follow a clockwise flow, with athletes exiting the same stairs that they entered from. Athletes will enter the water in a continuous stream through a controlled access point at the stair entrance as they enter the water, similar to how running road races are started. An athlete’s time will start when they cross timing mats at the stairs. Athletes will be directed to self-seed on race morning based on their projected swim time. Volunteers and staff will be in the staging area with signs and will assist with this process. Self-seeding will not be mandatory, but will be encouraged.

The professional men’s field will start their day at 6:40 a.m., and the professional women will start at 6:45 a.m.  Age group athletes will follow at 6:50 a.m.  We anticipate that all athletes will be in the water by 7:20 a.m. All athletes will still be given the 2 hour 20 minute time limit to complete the swim portion of the race; however, the current overall cut-off times for both the bike and run course, as well as any intermediate cut-offs, will remain in place.

The 2017 IRONMAN Arizona offers 40 qualifying slots for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.

 

 

 

Event details here

IRONMAN World Championships Broadcast Premier Viewing Party in NYC!

Having Kona withdrawals? Here’s a very good reason to book a trip…a trip to the Big Apple!

The Broadcast Premiere Viewing Party of the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship will be taking place on December 5th in New York City. Besides a front row seat at the finish line in Kona, this party is slated to be the Best Night in Triathlon.

The evening will begin with a welcome reception mix & mingle with professional athletes, featured inspirational athletes, and an opportunity to take a piece of IRONMAN World Championship history home with you via a silent auction. There will even be an opportunity to bid on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to race in the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship and 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship during the live auction!

Following the reception, you will experience all the action of the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship NBC broadcast before it airs nationwide. The evening concludes with a Q&A session discussing all the behind-the-scenes details with a panel of IRONMAN Professional Athletes and IRONMAN Hall of Fame members.

Celebrity guests to include 3-time IRONMAN World Champion Mirinda Carfrae, IRONMAN U.S. Champion Timothy O’Donnell, and of course The “Voice” of IRONMAN Mike Reilly.

Tickets are on sale now with proceeds benefitting the IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund. Click here to purchase tickets.

For the Data-Hungry: 2017 IRONMAN® World Championship Interactive Quarq Qollector Pacing Analysis

From Training Peaks

The tape has long been broken, the champagne sprayed and champions crowned at the 2017 IRONMAN® World Championship, but for the first time we have in-depth access to data that paints a new and dynamic picture of the day.

What we saw on the live broadcast on October 14 didn’t fully capture the strategies and pacing that played out on course on a day that resulted in a new course record and several new names making the podium for the first time in both the women’s and men’s professional races.

With the help of the Quarq and their Quarq Qollector, IRONMAN’s® Live Pro Race Tracking Partner, we were able to analyze real-time data, which we shared for various athletes live during the race through the IRONMAN® Live Blog. Additionally, we were able to study comparative data after the race, giving us valuable new insight into the pacing throughout the bike and the run for the top athletes in both the women’s and men’s races.

We recently wrote about the power and pacing of Lionel Sanders during this year’s race. The Canadian pro cracked a major piece of the Kona puzzle on his third attempt by finishing second after being passed by eventual champion Patrick Lange at mile 23. Using the Qollector, we can put his effort into the larger comparative context and see how the fast pace of the bike played out favorably for strong runner Lange, but cost other top pros like Sebastian Kienle the top spot.

On the women’s side, the data shows that despite being the heavy pre-race favorite, it was no cake walk for Daniela Ryf on her way to her third straight victory. We can see that she was fighting hard to stave off the hard-charging dark horse Lucy Charles for much of the bike and the run.

Before we dive into the data for the men’s and women’s pro races, take a look at the interactive tool Quarq has graciously set up for everyone to use to compare pro athletes’ paces throughout the race….

Read the full article and complete analysis

Update from Matt Russell

From Matt’s Instagram: (@mattrusselltri)

Feeling very grateful today. God truly gave me another chance in life.
I have my family, I can walk, the sharpness of my mind is starting to come back. I am physically and very emotionally hurt and shaken up but thankful for so many things. You can not see in the photo but I have stitches on the side of my neck over 7 inches long which was life threatening. Thank you for all of the people that were at the scene that quickly responded to me as I would not be here if it wasn’t for you. Always nice to have my friend and now Ironman World Champ @PatrickLange come visit me. Congrats to all on the day and remember each day truly is a gift from God. Thank you all for the support and even donating. I’m sure everyone has lots of questions but right now I’m going to spend my time with my family and recovering. I’ll try keep everyone updated on this as much as I can. Each day is truly a gift from God.

Matt Russell Update

From Slowtwitch

Fellow American pro Jesse Thomas was riding behind Matt Russell and witnessed the accident.

“He had just caught me about 5-10 min before and was in front of me heading back into town from Mauna Lani at that first intersection that leads to Waikoloa,” said Thomas to Slowtwitch. “Tailwind section, haven’t looked but I’m guessing we were going well over 30mph, he was pushing hard. I saw a truck start to cross the intersection and thought, ‘that’s cutting it way too close’, then the next moment a van pulled out behind the truck to try to cross as well. It looked like the crossing guard was animated in some way, either trying to wave the van quickly through or trying to get it to stop, but I couldn’t tell what was happening in the brief moments it all went down. I sat up immediately and yelled “oh fuck!” Matt saw it too and sat up and hit his brakes but had probably less than a second to do so and the van was too wide to miss from his angle. He went straight into the side of it nearly full speed. Super loud crash, looked like bike parts shattering, etc…

Read the full story

UPDATE from Triathlete Magazine:

Matt Russell’s wife, Gillian has shared this statement on Matt’s condition with us:

At this time, Matt remains in the hospital and he is getting the care he desperately needs.

Since the accident, Matt has had multiple procedures and surgeries to address the life threatening injuries he suffered Saturday.

While Matt is resting more comfortably than yesterday we are not out of the woods yet as Matt’s doctors remain concerned with the magnitude and severity of his concussion and vascular injuries.

Matt loves to race and I know he will want to get back when he’s able. However, it’s way too early to know if and when that may happen.

At this point we just want Matt home. Home with me and his newborn son – it’s going to take months of intense rehab to get him prepared for everyday life – and frankly the sooner we can get started the better.

2017 IRONMAN World Championships Kona – Bill Plock’s Tri Hearter Recap

BEN HOFFMAN

By Bill Plock

I’m struggling to know what to share with you. There is so much. So much. Joy. Triumph. Sadness. Perseverance. Grit. Guts. Tenacity. The list is super long!

The results of the Ironman World Championships are not measured by a clock, or a place on a podium or by a Garmin. They are measured by smiles, tears and hugs. By racing and watching this race, we make huge deposits in the experience bank of our souls that serve us later in life.

Colorado’s Vicki Derrick and Jamie Twedt

It’s hard to share an epic event like this without using a cliche. I need to remember that to “narrow your focus broadens your appeal” and as one of the eyes and ears of 303triathlon, my “job” is to share with you and try to find relativity in this ocean of stories. Imagine you are on the pier and 2,400 boats appear on the horizon intending to land. Each one from a different place, maybe a different continent, maybe even from a country you didn’t know existed. Each boat carries stories and dreams and some are captained alone but most come with a crew. But they all have one goal. To finish.

Being in Kona for race week is like being on a captive island of history and tradition drawing these boats in like a compass faces north. The triathlon world focuses here for the week. Even if the Ironman distance is not your race of choice, the challenge of the sport clearly radiates here. Experts and those in the industry greet all of these boats, and in our case meeting legends like Bob Babbitt and Mike Reilly to share the history and meaning of this race just make the landing that much richer.

D3 Multisport’s Simon Butterworth, on his way to winning his age group

I encourage you to listen to those interviews to gain a true perspective on what happens here and what HAS happened here. What I have learned, and continue to learn each time I am here, is that to know the history, and to respect the race is essential to understand its epic nature.

With the focus on Colorado and our saturation of this race with 54 athletes toeing the line we have a lot share—and a lot to be thankful for. It feels like family. With all those boats landing and people scurrying everywhere, to latch on to a familiar smile, to know just a few stories is like finding a life preserver in rough unknown waters.

303 Ambassador Todd Plymale-Mallory encourages Andy Potts

We at 303 see ourselves as a bridge to you. A place where you can see what happens when your friends and loved ones landed here with 2,346 other athletes. Yes some came here to win it all, and our local pro, Andy Potts, was the first American across the line. We in Colorado have a lot to be proud of.

The other 53 athletes persevered. We tried to share moments of each of their journeys and for any we may have missed, it wasn’t for lack of trying. And you made Colorado proud and it was such an honor to share your journey with our readers and subscribers a few thousand miles away. Even with technology of instant connectivity, it’s the intangible flow of like-minded energy and a love of this sport and a love of every journey we encountered, that hopefully rushed at the speed of light into your hearts. We hope you felt what we did, and sharing that and feeling such a wonderful community in Colorado at the “Super Bowl” of triathlon is what makes being at this race epic.

Be proud 303 Nation. We have the most amazing triathlon community in the world.

Athlete, Matt Russell, struck on Ironman cycling course, suffers serious injuries

KAILUA-KONA — A professional athlete suffered serious injuries after he struck a vehicle on the cycling course of the 39th annual Ironman championship, Saturday morning.

The accident occurred around 11 a.m. Hawaii Police Maj. Robert Wagner said the cyclist was traveling toward Kona on Queen Kaahumanu Highway when he broadsided a vehicle crossing the highway from Waikoloa Road.

According to the Ironman Track app, the athlete was 75 miles into the 112-mile course and had four hours of race time when he was last tracked at mile marker 76.

The cyclist was taken to North Hawaii Community Hospital. Wagner said the cyclist was reported in serious condition around 1 p.m. By 3:30 p.m., his condition appeared to be improving.

Janey Brink said the accident happened right in front of her while she was cheering the athletes on from the highway with family and friends. She said the cyclist was going full speed when the vehicle pulled in front of him in the intersection.

“I’ve never seen a body go through what his body went through,” Brink said. “He came out of his clips.”

Brink splits her time between Hawaii Island and Albuquerque, New Mexico. She said she came to visit with her husband and friends, specifically to watch Ironman.

Brink said police used her umbrella to cover the cyclist. Officials also asked they stay around so they could talk to them about the crash.

“No one ever came to talk to us and we stayed for a long time,” Brink said.

Wagner said there were some cones in the area where the crash occurred but there are also several police officers directing traffic at the intersection. The accident is under investigation.

Brink said those directing traffic were allowing cars to cross the intersection two or three vehicles at a time.

“We couldn’t understand why cars in that intersection were still moving,” she said.

Brink said the riders had no idea there was an incident in the intersection and that it was another incident waiting to happen, almost.

 

“This rider, he could do nothing,” she said. “These riders need to have a clear path and that intersection was not clear.”

There was another collision on the cycling course involving a pedestrian and a competitor. Wagner said the cyclist picked up his bike, but went out of view of the cameras that watch the course. Wagner wasn’t sure if the cyclist continued on, but it appeared that way.

Wagner said Saturday evening no other collisions on the course were reported.

Original West Hawaii Today article HERE

 

A YouCaring page has been started to support Matt and his family.  You can find the link HERE.

 

 

303Radio talks with TrainingPeaks Dirk Friel on Colorado Representation at Swim Start

TrainingPeaks co-founder and Chief Evangelist Dirk Friel talks about the Ironman World Championship swim start and Colorado representation.

Colorado Athletes in Kona: Noone and Campbell

Nick Noone

 

I did my first triathlon when I was twelve years old on a whim, It was called the “YMCA Strong Kids Triathlon” and I only knew it existed because my neighbors were signed up. I did not do another triathlon for a handful of years following that first one as I needed some time to forget about how I almost drowned and threw up simultaneously during the 100 meter swim. As a high school runner and swimmer it was on my radar as a possible progression of my athletic career. At the University of Colorado I raced on the triathlon team for 4 years and solidified my love of the sport. I always said I would never race an Ironman but following  Every Man Jack team camp in February I softened to the idea as it provided a great opportunity to spend more time with my teammates. Later my Dad mentioned he would love to go to Hawaii and I was pretty much sold. A few months later I was on the start line at Ironman Santa Rosa.

Olympic is my favorite distance to race, short and sweet.

This will be my first time racing in Kona and I am super excited to be doing so as a member of the Every Man Jack Triathlon Team


Iain Campbell

Iain started his endurance sports journey back in 2010 during a family vacation to Machu Pichu where he realized that through his focus on a Corporate career that the fitness of his youth had long since dissipated, so started a commitment to fitness and running and in turn Triathlon. Iain now lives in Boulder Colorado where he is Managing Director at the Rocky Mountain Institute, a non-profit working to hasten a transition to a clean energy system. Iain has completed the last 5 Boston Marathons, 5 full Ironman events with his second appearance at Kona coming up in 2017.

303Radio: Colorado’s Smokin’ Fast Tim Hola

303Radio caught up with smoking fast Tim Hola at the King Kamehameha Kona Beach hotel. Humble as always, but with 15 years of experience racing here, we know he is going to crush it on Saturday at the Ironman World Championship. Good luck Tim! Make Colorado proud!!