Quick Notes from Today’s IRONMAN Pre-Race Press Conference and Pro Panel

The 303Triathlon team attending this morning’s pre-race press briefing. Here are some snippets from the introduction by IRONMAN CEO Andrew Messick and the pro panel that followed.

Highlights from Andrew Messick’s “State of IRONMAN”:

The next location for the 70.3 World Championship race was announced! Taupo, New Zealand in November of 2020.

2018 is shaping up to be IRONMAN’s best year ever, with 225,000 unique athletes participating events around the globe – up 10% from 2017.

IRONMAN’s 2018 partnership with Facebook has allowed them to create a bigger, broader broadcast platform with live coverage of many races, including 20 hours of live coverage, from 4 am to 1 am, for Saturday’s world championship race.

2019 will feature 41 full-distance IRONMAN races and 117 70.3s, with new races in Oman, Greece, Russia, and India.

Highlights from the pros:

Javier Gomez is excited to get out of his comfort zone in his first go at Kona. As for his expectations for Sunday, he said: “the race will put me in my place.”

Mirinda Carfrae and Tim O’Donnell both mentioned their daughter Izzy, born just over a year ago, when discussing this year’s race. Rinny has been “pleasantly surprised” with how her season has gone after coming back after giving birth and she’s excited to see how she measures up against the new talent in the sport. Tim acknowledged that he was mentally and emotionally drained at last year’s race, which was only a few weeks after Izzy’s birth; as for this year, he said he’s not phased by pressure to be the next American to win Kona: “it’s not the result, it’s the process.”

Sebastian Kienle, who won in 2014, said he’s motivated more by his disappointing finish last year: “there is nothing more dangerous to success in the future than success in the past.”

The panel concluded with a few questions from the audience. Noah Aldrich (12) asked the first question. Noah has completed 17 triathlons in tandem with his brother, Lucas (10), who suffers from a rare neurological condition called lissencephaly, and asked the pros what advice they would give to a young triathlete who hopes to one day be a pro. Patrick Lange advised him to have “fun, fun, fun” with the sport, and said to Noah, “it’s not that we’re inspiring you, you’re inspiring us.”

More than anything, I was struck by the friendship and camaraderie evident among the pros as they entered and concluded the panel. While they are clearly fierce competitors on the course, there is obvious respect and fellowship between them as well.

IRONMAN World Championship Features 20 Hours of Live Race Day Coverage

From IRONMAN (Oct. 8, 2018) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, is excited to announce unprecedented global coverage from the Island of Hawai`i for the 2018 IRONMAN® World Championship brought to you by Amazon. This year as IRONMAN celebrates 40 Years of Dreams, nearly 20 hours of live coverage is scheduled and will be available through NBCSN, NBC and NBCSports.com in the United States and globally on www.facebook.com/IRONMANNow. Beginning in the early morning hours with athlete body marking, the dynamic coverage will take viewers through the male and female professional races and all the way through the event’s final finisher just after midnight.

“There is no better way to celebrate IRONMAN’s 40th Anniversary and the amazing achievements of our athletes from around the world than with coverage that takes viewers inside the action,” said Matthieu Van Veen, Chief Revenue Officer for IRONMAN. “As we celebrate this important milestone in our history, we are proud to be able to work with premiere global media companies to give an unprecedented look inside the pinnacle event of endurance sports.”

Coverage for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon triathlon begins Tuesday, October 9 with daily live shows at 2 p.m. ET from the Island of Hawai`i, running through race day on www.facebook.com/IRONMANNow. The daily coverage will bring the global audience to the island with behind-the-scenes access to the athlete preparation, interviews with professional athletes, age groupers, legends of the sport as well as presentations of the legendary course and event

The IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon will be broadcast in the USA through the various platforms of NBC Sports including the live start of the race on NBCSN on Saturday, October 13 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. ET with live reports airing on NBCSB and NBC throughout race day and the live race coverage on NBCSports.com. A full race highlight program will air on NBCSN, Sunday, October 14 from 12:00-1:00 a.m. ET and 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET.

The IRONMAN Now channel on Facebook Watch will provide 20 hours of live coverage on race day.

  • The live body marketing show will air from 10:40-11:40 a.m. ET, and will feature a fully-produced, “red carpet” event as athletes prepare for their race. Paula Newby-Fraser, 8x IRONMAN World Champion will join IRONMAN World Champion Greg Welch, 3x IRONMAN Champion Michael Lovato and IRONMAN Europe Commentator Paul Kaye to capture the tension and excitement of this unique element of our sport.
  • Live in-depth race coverage will begin at 12:10 p.m. ET. and continue through the male and female professional races.
  • Coverage will continue at 5:20am ET on Sunday, October 14, with the Finish Line Party, an inspiring celebration of the IRONMAN World Championship as the 2018 crowned champions will come back to the celebratory finish line with as spectators cheer on the final athletes as they cross the magical finish line.

Producing this year’s event is Amaury Sport Organisation (A.S.O.), a best-in-class television production company that is highly experienced in Live coverage of endurance sports events such as the Tour de France to audiences around the world. The live-action will include more cameras than ever before and aerial imagery that will put viewers into the heart of the race, showcasing the amazing beauty and grueling conditions that the island of Hawai’i is known for.

Kailua-Kona, located on the west coast of the Island of Hawai`i, offers the perfect year-round climate and is an ideal location for this iconic, single-day sporting event. The 2018 field of athletes will tackle the ROKA 2.4-mile ocean swim in Kailua Bay, followed by the Ventum 112-mile bicycle ride along the Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway from Kailua-Kona to the turnaround in Hawi, capped with a 26.2-mile HOKA ONE ONE run beginning on Ali’i Drive, where spectators pack the roads, up Palani Road to the Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway, before making their way to the infamous Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawai`i Authority. Athletes will complete their journey to the roar of tens of thousands of spectators as they cross the historic Ali’i Drive finish line.

For live tracking, real-time results and instant tracking notifications, fans can follow both professional and age-group athletes on the IRONMAN Tracker app, available for download from iTunes App Store and Google Play.

NBC will air this year’s installment of the Emmy Award Winning IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon broadcast special on Saturday, November 24, from 2:30-4:00 p.m. ET.

Get to Know our 2018 Team Colorado Kona Athletes

ELLEN HART

*What kind of bike do you ride? Trek Speed Concept 9.9–white with multicolored stripes.

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? Qualified at Hawaii 70.3, June 2.

*How many Ironman races have you done? This will be my 13th IM.

*How many times have you raced Kona? This will be my 10th Kona IM.

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about? Walking down Alii Drive both the day before the race and the day after, and taking it all in, reflecting on the magic of race day. Other, just in case that’s too connected to the race!: going to the state park beach between town of Kona and the airport (I forget the name of it).

*What is your favorite bike training route? What else? The Queen K!

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? Chocolate shake with extra protein.

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? Unexpectedly, my foot has been injured since March, and hasn’t healed. So this will be a very different Kona for me this year, just doing the swim and bike. It is not the way I’d intended to wind up my Kona and IM chapter, but there will be different gifts that day. I will try to be alert to receive them!

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? Wouldn’t it be fun if Mirinda Carfrae and Tim O’Donnell both won!?!

Two Team Colorado Kona Age Group Champs Returning in 2018

38 Team Colorado athletes will join approximately 2,500 others at this year’s 2018 IRONMAN World Championship race in Kona. Two Team Colorado returning Age Group champions from the 2017 race, Diana Hassel and Simon Butterworth, are highlighted in the article from IRONMAN regarding this year’s field.

From IRONMAN (Oct 5, 2018) – Approximately 2,500 of the world’s top athletes will compete in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i on Saturday, October 13 at the most iconic one-day endurance event in the world — the 2018 IRONMAN® World Championship brought to you by Amazon. IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, will celebrate the history of IRONMAN and the seminal event that continues to inspire so many, by bringing the world’s best triathletes together in competition on the 40th Anniversary of the original IRONMAN event.

This year’s edition of the IRONMAN World Championship will yet again welcome the largest international athlete field in race history with athletes hailing from 82 countries, regions and territories. Athletes ranging in age from 18 to 85 have earned their world championship opportunity by qualifying at one of more than 40 IRONMAN events worldwide.

This year, Europe represents 46 percent of the field, while North America closely follows with 34 percent of athletes registered to race in the IRONMAN World Championship. Asia-Pacific brings eight percent of participants, with South America at seven percent.

“The evolution of this race over the past 40 years, from its modest beginnings to the iconic globally recognized phenomenon it has become, is truly extraordinary,” said Andrew Messick, President and Chief Executive Officer of IRONMAN. “From the very first race on the shores of Oahu, Hawai`i in 1978, IRONMAN has carved out a unique legacy in sports history and the pinnacle IRONMAN World Championship event showcases the best global competitors from around the world every year. We look forward to the next 40 years as our athletes continue to shape history through extraordinary feats and life-altering journeys.”

The United States of America is the most represented nation with 640 registered competitors, followed by Germany (215), Australia (208), and the United Kingdom (130). Athletes will travel from 46 U.S. states, with the greatest number coming from California (91), followed by Hawai`i (45), Texas (44), Colorado (38), and New York (35). Others from countries as far as South Africa, Brazil and Uzbekistan are traveling around the globe for their shot at a title.

This year, returning age-group champions from the 2017 IROMAN World Championship on the women’s side include Sione Jongstra (NLD), Michaela Rudolf (AUT), Diana Hassel (USA) and Missy LeStrange (USA). On the men’s side, returning age-group champions include Antoine Mechin (FRA), Guillaume Montoisy (BEL), Christophe Lemery (FRA), Rick Simpson (USA), Simon Butterworth (USA) and Fidel Rotondaro (VEN).

Racing alongside the returning age-group winners is an inspiring group of athletes that includes:

  • Jordan Bethke, a former pro triathlete and current U.S. Navy EOD Officer stationed in Hawai`i, who will be racing to support Kenton Stacy (#StacyStrong), a fellow EOD Officer critically wounded while serving in Syria
  • Rachel Brenke, a cancer survivor, mother of five, lawyer, and entrepreneur shows her commitment to sport and ability to balance what life can bring while achieving her goals
  • Leigh Chivers, who after suffering personal tragedies with the loss of both his wife Sara and 18-month-old son Alfie to brain cancer, will be looking to honor them while completing one of his wife’s dying wishes, to compete at the IRONMAN World Championship
  • Marcus Cook, in only a year and a half, Marcus dropped from 489lbs down to 233lbs. Following the death of close friend, Marcus decided to make huge lifestyle changes and now attribute his success to triathlon and will race for the IRONMAN Foundation after raising over $100,000 on his way to preparing for Kona.
  • Isabella del la Houssaye, is a mother of five, suffering from stage 4 lung cancer and has completed 15 IRONMAN events and 100 total marathons including one in each of 49 states. Isabella will race for the IRONMAN Foundation with the support of Ventum, and on race day, with the completion of the run portion of the IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon triathlon, Isabella will check the box for completing a marathon in all 50 states.
  • Elle Goodall, who dropped over 250lbs (115 kg) in a stunning lifestyle change that has taken her from fast food addict to the start line of this historic event
  • Bob Jordan, a father who was gifted an entry to the 1997 IRONMAN World Championship after his five-year-old daughter suffering from leukemia wrote letter to IRONMAN. 20 years later Bob qualified at IRONMAN Maryland and will race in her memory this year in Kona.
  • Kyle and Brent Pease, a dynamic team of brothers, Brent competing with his and younger brother Kyle, who has spastic quadriplegia cerebral palsy, will look to raise awareness for, motivate and enable athletes with disabilities in the brothers first trip to the IRONMAN World Championship
  • Sarah Reinertsen, the first above-the-knee amputee to finish the IRONMAN World Championship (in 2005) and a gold medal winning para-triathlete returns to Kona to celebrate her place in history and IRONMAN’s “40 Years of Dreams.”

Have Your Eyes on Racing Kona? Here Are Eight Ways To Get There …

Have you always dreamed of toeing the start line at the IM World Championship in Kona? You may not realize that there are a range of ways to get there beyond being super fast. Here are eight ways to get to Kona:

1. Age Group Qualification
Every full-distance IRONMAN event offers a minimum of one qualifying spot per age group for the world championship. The number of qualifying slots in each age category is dependent on the number of competitors in each group. Finish at or near the top of the podium, or get lucky with a roll-down spot, and punch your ticket to Kona. Be sure to bring a credit card to the Roll-Down, as you’ve got to pay your entry fee on the spot.

2. Military Qualification
There are two Ironman 70.3 military qualification races that have allocated spots to the IRONMAN World Championships. Military members participating in a qualification event will be eligible for an Kona slot, allocated on a basis similar to age group qualification.

Full info found here.

3. IRONMAN Legacy Program
The IRONMAN Legacy Program was introduced in 2012 as a way to recognize and reward the most dedicated repeat athletes. Through the IRONMAN Legacy Program, athletes who have completed a 12 full-distance IRONMAN-branded races and have never competed at the IRONMAN World Championship have an opportunity to be selected for a special slot to compete in the IRONMAN World Championship.

Legacy requirements include:
– Athlete must have completed a minimum of 12 full-distance IRONMAN-branded* races (includes existing and past events) by December 31st of the current year.
- Athlete has never participated in the IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawai’i.
– Athlete must have completed at least one full-distance IRONMAN event in two consecutive years prior to World Championship.
– Athlete must be registered for a full-distance IRONMAN event in current year.
*2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run

There are currently 100 legacy spots per year.

Full info found here.
Read about 2018 Team Colorado Legacy athletes Rich Kiser and John Van Soest.

4. Physically Challenged/Open Exhibition Drawing

The IRONMAN World Championship Physically Challenged Open/Exhibition Division is available to athletes with a medically verified physical, visual, or neurological impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.

Athletes who are drawn will need to validate their entry by completing at any time between October 14, 2017 and August 19, 2018, a triathlon consisting of, at a minimum, and on a single day, a 1.2-mile swim, a 56-mile bike ride, and a 13.1-mile run. The validating race must have been completed as an individual participant and not as part of a relay team.

Full info found here.
Read about 2018 Team Colorado Physically Challenged athlete Jeffrey Lampe.

5. IRONMAN Foundation Fundraising
The IRONMAN Foundation creates positive, tangible change in IRONMAN race communities by engaging athletes and volunteers to participate in programs that demonstrate service through sport and commitment to community. The IRONMAN Foundation awards a Kona bib to their top fundraiser each year, as well as other select slots including one for Women for Tri.

Full info found here.
Read about 2018 Team Colorado Women for Tri athlete Triny Willerton.

6. IRONMAN Foundation Lottery
10 Kona slots are lotteried through the annual IRONMAN Foundation Kona Drawing. Lottery entries have a suggested donation of $50. Donations benefit the IRONMAN Foundation’s charitable giveback in our race communities around the world and are 100% tax deductible.

Full info found here.

7. IRONMAN Foundation Auction
5 Kona slots are auctioned on eBay. The auctions run for 7 days and the proceeds of the auction benefit the Ironman Foundation. In 2018 one of the spot’s proceeds went to Women for Tri.

The IRONMAN World Championship Annual Kona Auction Winner(s) receive:
– Race bib to compete at The IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua, Kona
– Private athlete registration in Kona
– Four VIP packages
– Invitations to exclusive race-week functions

The auctions have raised over $2M dollars for the Ironman Foundation. Minimum bid is $10,000

Full info found here.

7. IRONMAN Executive Challenge, a.k.a IRONMAN XC
This is a member’s only program and provides guaranteed entry to IRONMAN events, the opportunity to compete for IRONMAN World Championship slots, VIP passes, first-class accommodations and much more. Participants are required to have qualified for their spot at the IRONMAN World Championships at an Ironman Executive Challenge event.

Full info found here.
Learn more about 2018 Team Colorado Executive Challenge athlete Paul Dauber.

8. Outside Charity Spots
In a sport that lends itself to a laser-like focus on individual performance, the IRONMAN Charity Partner program helps athletes widen the spotlight by illuminating worthy causes. Giving athletes a purpose beyond their own accomplishment, the program aims to inspire IRONMAN athletes to fundraise for selected charity partners as a way to add meaning to their training and racing.

Full info found here.
Read about 2018 Team Colorado Team In Training athlete Brett Kessler.

Could an American Win in Kona This Year?

From Triathlete.com
by Susan Lacke

The last time an American won the Ironman World Championship, My Big Fat Greek Wedding was showing in movie theaters. Kelly Clarkson had just won the first-ever season of American Idol, and the world was gearing up for the winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, UT. That was the year that American Tim DeBoom won in Kona with a time of 8:29:56. DeBoom’s time would be considered slow by today’s pro standards, set by a wave of Australian and German athletes who have inched ever closer to the sub-8 mark, leaving Americans in their dust. In the women’s race, the drought has lasted even longer, as an American hasn’t won since 1996.

Could 2018 be the year the USA takes back the Kona crown? This year’s American athletes provide some of the best odds for a Kona win since…well, Kelly Clarkson won American Idol. The top bets for an American victory in Kona:

Women

American Heather Jackson. Photo: Oliver Baker

Heather Jackson
The 2016 third-place finisher is hungrier than ever for the win. Her 9:02:29 finish in Kona last year was less than a minute behind third-place finisher Sarah Crowley, and the experience fueled her all-in mentality for 2018. Her wire-to-wire win at Ironman Lake Placid in July, where she clocked a 9:18:49, shows she’s in top form and ready to rumble.

Linsey Corbin
With 11 appearances on the Kona start line, Corbin has more experience at this race than anyone else in the pro ranks, male or female. Within those years are three top-ten finishes and countless lessons on mastering the Kona game. She’s the fastest American female in history, holding an Ironman record of 8:42:42. Her recent “back-to-basics” approach to training has focused on consistency, recovery, and balance. She went ahead and nabbed her Kona 2019 spot with a win at Ironman Wisconsin in September. Will the decision to race such a late 140.6 help or hurt her Kona chances? We’ll find out!

Jocelyn McCauley
In only her first pro race at the Ironman World Championships, McCauley finished 10th place in 9:21:08. She backed up that breakthrough race with a third-place finish at Ironman New Zealand in March, and has been laser-focused on Kona since, taking the lessons she learned in her rookie year to improve for her second go-around. She looked sharp at Ironman 70.3 Santa Rosa, where she finished fourth in a strong field that included three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda Carfrae.

Sarah Piampiano
Piampiano hasn’t finished off the podium in 2018—in five 70.3 and full starts this year, she’s taken five top-three finishes, including a win at 70.3 Lima and second place at Ironman Brazil. Can she keep the trend rolling in Kona? It’s certainly feasible—a look at her performance since turning pro in 2012 has shown a strictly upward trajectory, and Piampiano shows no signs of letting up.

Sarah True
The two-time Olympian made the jump to racing Ironman this year, and what a jump it was: True nailed her first-ever attempt at the distance, taking second place at the Ironman European Championship in Frankfurt with a time of 9:05:19. The first-place finisher? Defending Ironman world champion Daniela Ryf. True, who will be making her Kona debut this year, is a dark horse, but her history at both short-course and the 70.3 distance shows she’s got the chops to take on big names and high stakes.

 

Men

Ben Hoffman. Photo: Oliver Baker

Ben Hoffman
Hoffman is the closest America has come to the top step of the podium in recent years, taking second place in 2014. Though he’s had some stellar races since, including a sub 8-hour performance at Ironman South Africa in 2017, this year has been a bit of a mixed bag. A bike crash during the Cape Epic mountain bike race derailed his plans to defend his title at Ironman South Africa; Hoffman struggled from the start of the race and finished in a personal worst time of 12:06:48. He finished second at both 70.3 Boulder and 70.3 Santa Cruz.

Timothy O’Donnell
With his third-place finish at Kona in 2015, O’Donnell is most recent American male to podium. His 8:00:54 performance at this year’s Ironman Asia-Pacific Championship was good enough for fourth place in a strong field that included many Kona qualifiers for this year. His superpower in Kona seems to be heat management—where others wilt on the bike and run, O’Donnell thrives.

Andy Potts
At 41 years old, Potts is the elder statesman of the race, but he can still mix it up with the young guns. Potts was the top American finisher at last year’s World Championship, clocking an 8:14:13 (including a blistering 2:50:27 marathon) to take seventh place. He’s come close to the top spot before, finishing fourth in 2014 and 2015, and is known for tweaking his routine to accommodate what he learns each time he races Kona. Will 2018 be the year he finally cracks the code?

Read the full article

Profession Triathlete Field Set for the 2018 Ironman World Championship

From IRONMAN (October 2, 2018) – Triathlon’s top professional talent will assemble at the start line in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i for the 2018 IRONMAN® World Championship brought to you by Amazon, taking place on October 13. The most iconic one-day endurance event in the world will bring together a highly regarded and competitive professional field, headlined by defending champions Patrick Lange (DEU) and Daniela Ryf (CHE).

“This is a monumental year for IRONMAN as we celebrate four decades of racing at the IRONMAN World Championship in Hawai`i,” said Andrew Messick, President & Chief Executive Officer of IRONMAN. “We look forward not only to honoring the historic professional performances from years past, but also showcasing the ever-growing international triathlete talent that will be on full display.”

The women’s professional field will seek to dethrone three-time IRONMAN World Champion Daniela Ryf (CHE), who continues to add to her impressive resume. In addition to earning her fourth IRONMAN®70.3® World Champion title this past September in South Africa, Ryf also came away with victories at the Mainova IRONMAN European Championship in Frankfurt and Enea IRONMAN 70.3 Gdynia in Poland.

Up for the challenge will be a host of strong contenders, including last year’s other podium finishers Lucy Charles (GBR) and Sarah Crowley (AUS), as well as the highly anticipated return of three-time IRONMAN World Champion, Mirinda Carfrae (AUS). Charles, who finished second a year ago, is coming off two impressive showings in Africa with a win in April’s Standard Bank IRONMAN African Championship and a second-place finish at the 2018 Isuzu IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in September. Crowley will be looking to improve upon her third-place finish from a year ago and is in good form following a win at the 2018 IRONMAN Hamburg triathlon and a third-place finish at the 2018 Mainova IRONMAN European Championship in Frankfurt. Carfrae rejoins the ranks of the elite in Kona after spending a year away for the birth of her daughter. With wins this year at IRONMAN 70.3 Santa Rosa and IRONMAN 70.3 Augusta combined with a strong second-place showing at the 2018 Cairns Airport IRONMAN Asia-Pacific Championship in Cairns, Carfrae has been at full force on her comeback trail.

The women’s field only just begins there, as other seasoned and decorated competitors join this elite group. Heather Jackson (USA) is a ten-time IRONMAN 70.3 Champion and multi-time Top 5 finisher at the IRONMAN World Championship, while Kaisa Sali (FIN) finished fifth in last year’s IRONMAN World Championship and earned first-place finishes at the 2018 IRONMAN Switzerland and 2018 Mazda IRONMAN 70.3 Monterrey triathlons. Susie Cheetham (GBR) finished second at the 2018 Standard Bank IRONMAN African Championship, just minutes after fellow British racer Lucy Charles, and joins newcomer Teresa Adam (NZL), who earned a victory at the 2018 Cairns Airport IRONMAN Asia-Pacific Championship in Cairns, as others to watch.

Below is the pro women’s start list for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon:

BIB LAST FIRST COUNTRY REP
F1 Ryf Daniela CHE (Switzerland
F2 Charles Lucy GBR (United Kingdom)
F3 Crowley Sarah AUS (Australia)
F4 Sali Kaisa FIN (Finland)
F5 Cheetham Susie GBR (United Kingdom)
F7 Jackson Heather USA (United States of America)
F8 Jahn Kirsty CAN (Canada)
F9 True Sarah USA (United States of America)
F11 Carfrae Mirinda AUS (Australia)
F12 Hufe Mareen DEU (Germany)
F14 Lester Carrie AUS (Australia)
F15 Siddall Laura GBR (United Kingdom)
F16 McCauley Jocelyn USA (United States of America)
F17 Piampiano Sarah USA (United States of America)
F18 Corbin Linsey USA (United States of America)
F19 Adam Teresa NZL (New Zealand)
F20 Vesterby Michelle DNK (Denmark)
F21 Blatchford Liz AUS (Australia)
F22 Smith Lesley USA (United States of America)
F23 Genet Manon FRA (France)
F24 Robertson Jodie USA (United States of America)
F25 Abraham Corinne GBR (United Kingdom)
F26 McBride Rachel CAN (Canada)
F27 Pallant Emma GBR (United Kingdom)
F28 Frades Gurutze ESP (Spain)
F29 Frederiksen Helle DNK (Denmark)
F30 Huetthaler Lisa AUT (Austria)
F31 Stage Nielsen Maja DNK (Denmark)
F32 Annett Jen CAN (Canada)
F33 Deckers Tine BEL (Belgium)
F34 Kessler Meredith USA (United States of America)
F35 Haug Anne DEU (Germany)
F36 Brandon Lauren USA (United States of America)
F37 Burke Melanie NZL (New Zealand)
F38 Lundstrom Asa SWE (Sweden)
F39 McKenzie Beth USA (United States of America)
F40 Konschak Katja DEU (Germany)
F41 Svensk Sara SWE (Sweden)
F42 Angela Naeth USA (United States of America

The men’s group is equally stacked with titleholders and contenders, including last year’s IRONMAN World Champion, Patrick Lange (DEU). Lange will seek his second win in Kona, where he holds a course-best time of 8:01:40 from his win in 2017, as well as the marathon run-course best time of 2:39:45, set in 2016 when he finished third. Also competing for the title is Lionel Sanders (CAN), who led the race last year through mile 23 of the marathon before giving way to Lange and ultimately earning second. Sebastian Kienle (DEU), the 2014 IRONMAN World Champion, placed fourth in the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship and will be looking for another title after just missing the podium last year. Meanwhile last year’s third-place finisher David McNamee (GBR) looks to follow the trajectory of Lange, moving from a third-place finish to becoming a world champion the following year.

Adding to the competition will be James Cunnama (ZAF), who placed fifth at the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship and Javier Gomez Noya (ESP), an Olympic silver medalist and two-time IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion. Fans will also be keeping an eye on Tim Don (GBR), who was unable to race last year after a pre-race accident left him with a broken neck just days before the event. After a grueling road to recovery, Don has made a remarkable comeback, placing first at the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Costa Rica triathlon, only eight months after the accident. Americans Andy Potts and Ben Hoffman look to rejoin the Top 5 after both finished in the Top 10 in 2018.

Below is the pro men’s start list for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship brought to you by Amazon:

BIB LAST FIRST COUNTRY REP
M1 Lange Patrick DEU (Germany)
M2 Sanders Lionel CAN (Canada)
M3 Kienle Sebastian DEU (Germany)
M5 McNamee David GBR (United Kingdom)
M6 Cunnama James ZAF (South Africa)
M7 Gomez Noya Javier ESP (Spain)
M8 Nilsson Patrik SWE (Sweden)
M9 Amberger Josh AUS (Australia)
M10 Currie Braden NZL (New Zealand)
M11 Van Lierde Frederik BEL (Belgium)
M12 Tutukin Ivan RUS (Russian Federation)
M14 Potts Andy USA (United States of America)
M15 Buckingham Kyle ZAF (South Africa)
M16 Aernouts Bart BEL (Belgium)
M17 McMahon Brent CAN (Canada)
M18 Rana Ivan ESP (Spain)
M19 Wurf Cameron AUS (Australia)
M20 Van Berkel Tim AUS (Australia)
M21 Weiss Michael AUT (Austria)
M22 Amorelli Igor BRA (Brazil)
M23 Hanson Matt USA (United States of America)
M24 Skipper Joe GBR (United Kingdom)
M25 Clavel Maurice DEU (Germany)
M26 Van Berkel Jan CHE (Switzerland)
M27 Costes Antony FRA (France)
M28 Koutny Philipp CHE (Switzerland)
M29 Stein Boris DEU (Germany)
M30 Starykowicz Andrew USA (United States of America)
M31 McKenzie Luke AUS (Australia)
M32 Butterfield Tyler BMU (Bermuda)
M33 Clarke Will GBR (United Kingdom)
M34 Hoffman Ben USA (United States of America)
M35 Collington Kevin USA (United States of America)
M36 Duelsen Marc DEU (Germany)
M37 Petersen-Bach Jens DNK (Denmark)
M38 Viennot Cyril FRA (France)
M39 Phillips Mike NZL (New Zealand)
M40 Degasperi Alessandro ITA (Italy)
M41 Wild Ruedi CHE (Switzerland)
M42 Dreitz Andreas DEU (Germany)
M43 O’Donnell Tim USA (United States of America)
M44 Brown Cameron NZL (New Zealand)
M45 Guillaume Romain FRA (France)
M46 Chevrot Denis FRA (France)
M47 Vinhal Thiago BRA (Brazil)
M48 Plese David SVN (Slovenia)
M49 Chrabot Matt USA (United States of America)
M50 Molinari Giulio ITA (Italy)
M51 Reed Tim AUS (Australia)
M52 Schildknecht Ronnie CHE (Switzerland)
M53 Millward Callum NZL (New Zealand)
M54 Cochrane Simon NZL (New Zealand)
M56 Baldwin Nick SYC (Seychelles)
M57 Don Tim GBR (United Kingdom)
M58 Russell Matt USA (United States of America)

The 2018 IRONMAN World Championship will offer a $650,000 total professional prize purse which will be distributed to male and female first- through tenth-place finishers.

30 DAYS TO KONA – Friday Fun – Khem’s Spectathlete Must Haves!

Khem’s Spectathlete Must-Haves

We all know that spectating at a race, especially a long-distance one like IRONMAN, can be an endurance sport in itself. There’s nothing worse than trying to capture those special moments when your athlete rolls by and your smartphone is dead. So after many years of supporting athletes and working behind the fences at various races, I’ve found some must have items to add to your race-sherpa toolbox! Race day tested, Khem approved!

 


Cairn™ Lantern + Power Bank & Neve® Lightning Cable

What’s one of the biggest frustrations of being a race Sherpa? Dead phone? Tangled up lightning cable? Well, the folks at Lander have developed a handful of products that bridge the gap between the outdoors and technology. I’ve been lucky enough to give a few of their products a whirl, and I will tell you, I am thoroughly impressed.

The Cairn™ Lantern + Power Bank is exactly what it is. A lantern and power bank in one. It has a built-in multi-axis lanyard, allowing you to attach the light wherever you need it. The stitching in the lanyard, Illumifind™, is reflective and makes it easy to find in the dark. Just shine a light and it pops out! Want to take it to the next level? Their Cairn™ XL Smart Lantern is Bluetooth compatible. Via the free Cairn XL app, you can control power, dimming, color, light alarms, proximity lighting, battery settings, and light strobe.

Well, what’s the use of having a power bank if you don’t any cables? Lander outdid themselves with the Neve®Lightning Cable. Available in Lightning to USB, micro-USB, USB-C, and lengths of 3 feet or 10. Yep, 10 feet of charging bliss!!! Like their power banks, the cables feature the signature Illumiweave® reflective technology that makes it easy to find in the dark. They are also made of nylon in a flat, tangle-free design and long Everpull® connectors, avoiding breakage where most cables fail. Their lifetime warranty also stacks up to their claim that you’ll never need to buy a new cable. My cable has seen a fair amount of action with all the travel and race spectating, and so far I’m giving it a two thumbs up!

 


myCharge

Ever in a spot where you need an outlet and there’s none to be found? I have for sure!!! The myCharge Portable Power Outlet is a great solution for all those “need to plug in the wall” electronics. This device also has two USB-A ports and one USB-C port, so it’s like having a mini-generator and power bank in one device. Fully charged, there’s enough juice to run a 34-inch LED TV for up to four hours and the power bank recharges 50% faster than its competitors.

The easy to read light up screen tells you how much juice is left in the unit and the output of power, USB or power outlet. The durable rubber-like casing protects the myCharge from dings and scratches – no need to worry if it accidently gets knocked off the table. During long-haul flights or airport gate areas where power outlets are either scarce or non-existent, the myCharge Portable Power Outlet has kept my laptop and other electronics fired up so I don’t miss a beat! Definitely worth the investment if you aren’t not quite ready for going totally off the grid or have a plethora of electronic devices to charge up while your athlete is out racing!

 


Edifier MP100 Mini Bluetooth Speaker

As an athlete, I will tell you that hearing awesome tunes as you’re running by is such a great pick-me-up. As a spectathlete, it’s a great way to rally others around you and keep the energy high throughout a race. The Edifier MP100 Mini Bluetooth Speaker was a great companion while I was kayaking across Skaha Lake during the most recent Ultra 520K Canada race. The splash proof exterior ensured I had tunes regardless if the waves started to kick up. The clip at the top of the speaker made it easy to latch onto wherever I needed it. I was also impressed by the sound quality, and at times had to turn down the volume because it packs quite the punch. I also took it with me skiing, and through my pockets I could hear my music crystal clear. The speaker also doubles as a speakerphone so you can take calls hands free and keep on about your business.

 


The Tinkle Belle

I know what you all are thinking, but sometimes you’re stuck out in the middle of nowhere and nature decides to call…and for us ladies, squatting sometimes can be inconvenient. The Tinkle Belle is ergonomically design to fit the female undercarriage, minimizing the chance for leaks and splash backs. It also comes with a handy case that is waterproof lined just in the event there are a few drops left, and attached with a small carabiner making it super easy to transport. A few months ago at a pre-race briefing, when asked if there would be porto-potties along the course, the race director kindly responded with “You have 520km of bathroom at your disposal.” Disclaimer: Don’t use on private property and be discreet. Just because your friend/brother/boyfriend/husband pees in whatever corner they wish, doesn’t mean it’s okay…but pee freely standing up ladies!!

 

 


All these spectathlete must-haves (and more) will be making their way to Kona for the IRONMAN World Championship in my luggage. If you’re curious as to what other goodies will make the trip, feel free to reach out via email at khem@303colorado.com or comment on this article’s 303Triathlon Facebook post. See y’all on the Big Island!! Aloha!!

 


Khem Suthiwan is a staff content editor/media correspondent with 303 Endurance Network, a triathlete, triathlon coach with Mile High Multisport, IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador Athlete, member of the Palmares Racing Cycling Team, avid skier, SCUBA diver, finisher of the 2015 IRONMAN World Championship, and a Colorado resident since January 2001.

Get to Know our 2018 Team Colorado Kona Athletes

MATT CHRABOT (PRO)

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? I won IM Mar del Plata in Argentina last December

*How many Ironman races have you done? 6

*How many times have you raced Kona? This will be #2

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about?

*What is your favorite bike training route? Hill reps on Flagstaff Road in Boulder

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? Ice cold beer.

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? I didn’t expect PPR Team, an Italian Triathlon Team to reach out and ask me to represent them in 2018

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? Me.

TRINY WILLERTON

*What kind of bike do you ride? Argon18

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? I was granted a slot by the Ironman Foundation and Women for Tri

*How many Ironman races have you done? 7

*How many times have you raced Kona? 0

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about? We are attending several events hosted by the Ironman Foundation including a an event on Monday to give back to the community.

*What is your favorite bike training route? It has changed since my accident I know enjoy going up left hand canyon a lot.

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? I love ice cream

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? I got hit by a truck on May 8th. It has been an incredible journey of support from the community and self discovery.

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? Tim Don and Miranda Carfrae