IRONMAN Boulder Bike Course Reveal Party

With IRONMAN Boulder just a mere 143 days away, It’s time to reveal the bike course.

 

CMS will be hosting this special reveal party.  IRONMAN Boulder Race Director, Tim Brocious and his staff, have been working hard with the City and County of Boulder to develop an exciting and challenging course that keeps the safety of athletes, spectators and community a priority.

So, please bring your friends and questions and join 303Triathlon and IRONMAN Boulder at CMS on Friday evening.

 

Where: Colorado Multisport, 2480 Canyon Blvd, Boulder, CO 80302

When: Friday January 19, 5pm – 7pm ish with a 5:25 reveal

 

*light snacks will be available

Halo free, but a long way to go

By Herbert Krabel  From Slowtwitch.com

 

A terrible accident a few days before the 2017 IRONMAN World Championships took Brit Tim Don out of the race. The Halo (seen below) finally came off, but he is still a long way from being fully recovered. I chatted with him to see how he is doing and what is next.

Slowtwitch: Tim, how are you my friend?

Tim Don: Very happy and a bit stiff, but mostly happy. Halo free and loving it. Just unbelievable really. It has been a tough 3 months for us all, that’s for sure.

ST: The Halo time must have seemed like an eternity.

Tim: Yep it did seem like an eternity – 12 weeks to the day since the car hit me on the Queen K three days before the race. The nights were the toughest especially early on when I was not really sleeping longer than 60 minutes at a time. But onwards and upwards, it is off and I can move on to the next stage of my rehab and move a bit more as well.

ST: How did you sleep with that contraption?

Tim: Not so good to be honest, the first 3 weeks I slept in a chair, upright. As the brace came half way down my back and front, any pressure from leaning back on it put extra force on my screws, which were rather painful. At about 3 weeks I was off all the strong prescription pain killers and moved back upstairs back into a bed, but again upright with about 4 big pillows. The problem with all of these sleeping positions was my legs, they were just pooling with blood and swelling up big time even with compression socks and tights on, and it was neither good nor comfy. At about five weeks we decided to try a bed that can move up and down both for your head and legs and wow, I could sleep a full night! Still upright but as my legs were elevated they felt so much better. Now the Halo is off and within three days I was flat on my back and so happy. Simple things.

 

ST: So what is next on the road to recovery?

 

Read the complete interview here

Original 303Triathlon post from October 2017 here

Weekend Preview: Team Colorado & Chilly Cheeks

Triathlon Events

Saturday Jan. 13th

 

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Louisville

 

Grab your trainer and yoga mat and join IM Boulder and 303Triathlon Staff for this great monthly event.  This week we will start with a 90 min trainer session lead by 303’s Bill Plock followed by a 45 min Mobility Yoga for Triathletes session with Yogi Jamie Wheeler or a 45 min run, your choice.

Everyone is Welcome


Chilly Cheeks Duathlon Series Race #2

Denver



Cycling Events

Thursday Jan 11th

 

USA Cycling CX National Championships

Reno, Nv


Friday Jan 12th

 

Just Us Girls!

Denver


An evening with Amy Charity – The Wrong side of Comfortable

Denver


USA Cycling CX National Championships

Reno, Nv


Friday Jan 13th

 

USA Cycling CX National Championships

Reno, Nv


Sunday Jan 14th

 

USA Cycling CX National Championships

Reno, Nv

IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Event

Louisville

 

Join the IRONMAN Boulder race directors Dave Christen and Tim Brosious and 303Triathlon for an IRONMAN Team Colorado training event.

Please bring trainers for an indoor bike session about 90 mins long. If you have an extra trainer, please bring it along. Post ride choose from a 45 min yoga mobility for cycling session (please bring your mat) OR a run.

About Yoga Mobility with instructor Jamie Wheeler – immediately following the trainer ride as we work through some yoga mobility specific for the triathlete. The goal is not to experience extreme flexibility but rather mobility (free movement) to allow you to train injury free, recover from long training sessions and increase your mind-body connection as we learn about how breath can influence so much of your movement.  We, as athletes, ask our bodies to perform regularly at a high level. Learn to take at least 10-15 minutes daily to give back to your body and show it some love!

Everyone is welcome.
Mark your calendars for the 2nd Saturday of each month

 

Event details here

Tri Club Tuesday: D3 Athlete competes at IRONMAN World Championships after serious waterskiing injury

From Livewell Nebraska
By Kelsey Stewart

 

When Steve Nabity first took up triathlon training, he didn’t know how to swim, and he didn’t own a road bike.

The 61-year-old has since put six Ironman competitions under his belt. He made it to the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii last year, but a stomach bug hindered his performance. In October, Nabity returned to Hawaii to compete against more than 2,000 athletes in the sport’s iconic event.

Swimming and cycling were the Omaha man’s best options after he sustained a serious waterskiing injury.

Four years ago, Nabity and a group of friends were waterskiing in Tennessee. The then 57-year-old hadn’t been on the water in a few years, but he felt confident. When the boat started moving, Nabity attempted to stand up on his skis.

Instead of gracefully slaloming across the water, Nabity ended up doing the splits. Above the sound of the boat and water, he heard a ripping sound, like a piece of paper being torn.

His friends pulled Nabity from the water. By the time they got back to the dock, Nabity had fainted from the pain. Since they were in rural Tennessee, it took over an hour for an ambulance to arrive. When it did, paramedics decided to have Nabity life-flighted to the nearest hospital.

Doctors didn’t realize the scope of the injury until Nabity returned to Omaha. He had torn all three hamstring tendons off the bone of his right leg.

After surgery, Nabity spent six weeks in a brace. Unable to bend his legs, he spent his time either standing or resting flat on a recliner. He graduated to walking carefully. Leg and hamstring lifts during physical therapy helped rebuild his strength. Doctors encouraged Nabity to pick up low-impact exercises such as swimming and bicycling. “Those are for wimps,” he told them.

But when Nabity, CEO of Accu- Quilt, cheered on his son during an Ironman race in Idaho, it set things in motion.

His goal: make it to the race series’ marquee event in Kona, Hawaii, before he turned 80. The full-distance race consists of a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run.

“You never know what’s going to happen on your path or your journey,” Nabity said. “This probably is not the way I would have started out with Ironman. You’re doing life and a curve ball happens. All you can do is control your effort.”

Read the full story

Pro Qualifying for IRONMAN 140.6 and 70.3 World Championships returns to Slot-Based Allocations for 2019

TAMPA, Fla. (December 20, 2017) – Beginning with the 2019 qualifying year for both the IRONMAN® World Championship and IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship, the KPR and 70.3PR will no longer be used as the qualifying systems for the professional field. The current points-based system will be replaced by and return to a slot qualifying system. The change aligns with the global age-group system with qualifying slots being allocated to IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events on the global pro calendar for the respective world championship races.

The guaranteed base slot allocations will be equal for both male and female professional athletes, with additional slots being allocated and distributed to events based on the number of professional starters. The Regional Championship events will be assigned the greatest number of qualifying slots of any event on the pro circuit. Each qualifying IRONMAN or IRONMAN 70.3 event will have at a minimum one men’s and one women’s professional slot.

For the global 2019 IRONMAN professional calendar, the number of IRONMAN World Championship slots is expected to be approximately 100, similar to the current total allocation. Based upon the global 2019 IRONMAN 70.3 professional calendar, the current two-day format of the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship could allow for up to 170 professional athletes split between the days.

The five-year World Champion exemption will remain in effect, with the addition of a one-year exemption for IRONMAN World Championship podium finishers and a reciprocal exemption invitation to the IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion. All exemptions remain subject to completion of a validation race and remain additional to the guaranteed allocations to qualifying events.

“Finishing atop the podium at an IRONMAN or IRONMAN 70.3 event is a great accomplishment and the reward for that should be a place at the starting line at the World Championship events,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for IRONMAN. “The return to the slot system celebrates our champions and IRONMAN host communities around the world and changes the focus squarely back to recognizing great performances on race day. If you win you are in, and athletes will no longer need to calculate how to plan their race schedule to qualify.”

Qualifying for the 2019 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i will begin on September 9, 2018 with slots being awarded at IRONMAN Wisconsin and IRONMAN Wales.

Qualifying for the 2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in Nice, France will begin on July 8, 2018 with slots being awarded at IRONMAN 70.3 Jönköping and IRONMAN 70.3 Ecuador.

The KPR and 70.3PR Pro qualifying systems remain in effect with respect to qualifying for the 2018 IRONMAN® World Championship and 2018 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship.