Tri Coach Tuesday: Tips on IM Boulder

Written by Dave Sheanin, D3 Multisport

 

 

Boulder is the perfect place for an Ironman, of course!  It’s home to some of the fastest professional and age group triathletes in the world, and the 18x collegiate national champion CU Triathlon Team.  Who wouldn’t want to race here?  Nobody.  Of course you want to race here. Following are 16 specific tips I have gleaned from my experience on the course both racing and training.

 

PRE RACE

  • Remember that Boulder is at 5,430 feet above sea level–even higher than Denver, the Mile High City.  The air is thin up here and if you’re coming in from out of town, be sure to stay up on your hydration and don’t forget the sunscreen.

  • There are two separate transition areas–T1 is at the reservoir and T2 is at the high school.  You’ll take a bus from the high school to get to the Rez on race morning.  This is the only way to get to the race start.  Ironman has a ton of buses and there usually isn’t much of a wait, but my strong recommendation is to arrive at the high school first thing.  Better to have a little extra down-time out at the Rez than be standing at the high school waiting on a bus.

 

SWIM

This is one of the best IM swims on the circuit!  Not because the water is crystal clear (it’s not) and not because it’s an ultra-beautiful venue (we locals think it’s just fine).  No, what makes this an awesome swim is that you swim north, then west, then south.  What’s the big deal?  Let me remind you that the sun rises in the east.  You’re never swimming into the rising sun.

 

IM uses a rolling start in Boulder so you’ll self-seed by time per the normal procedure.  In the past, this race has been held in August and the Rez typically heats up to or above the wetsuit threshold temp, but in June, I would expect the Rez to be in the mid-60s and wetsuit legal.

 

 

The course is very well marked and only has two turns (both lefts).  You’ll exit on a boat ramp then make a right to pick up your T1 bag and a u-turn to head into the change tents.

 

 

Do not skip the sunscreen volunteers as you exit the change tent and head to your bike.  It only takes a couple of seconds to get fully slathered–you’ll want that protection in the Colorado sun.

 

 

 

BIKE

Each year this race has been held, the bike course has been different.  2017 brings a new course which I expect will stick.  It’s a three-loop affair with two moderate climbs per loop.  If you ride by TSS, it’s pretty convenient to shoot for just under 100 points per lap.

Climb one is the first 5 miles straight out of transition.  It doesn’t really look like a climb when you’re on it–just a steady 2 percent (give or take) until you reach the edge of town.  It’s tempting to push too hard in these first few miles because the grade is deceiving and you may be thinking you’re going too slowly.  Mind your watts or RPE.  Because there are two more loops, you’ll repeat this section around miles 35+ and 105+.

Climb two looks a bit more significant as you head west on Nelson Road starting a bit after mile 15 (repeating at miles 50+ and 85+).  This climb has ruined a lot of triathlete’s days in Boulder.  The total distance is about 4 miles and there are a couple of little kicks, but it’s otherwise pretty steady.  Again, mind your watts and pay no attention to the folks who rush up this climb–especially on the first lap.  They’re either on their way to a really outstanding ride, or more likely, you’ll be seeing them later.  Note that the wind typically blows from the northwest so you’ll be going into it as you head to the mountains and getting a push as you ride away from them.  It’ll likely be pretty calm in the early hours, but if you’re not among the fastest riders, the afternoon winds can make the third loop an extra challenge.  This climb into the wind is not so fun.

At the end of the third lap, you’ll turn left instead of right as you exit the road from the Rez (51st) and head downtown to the high school for T2.

 

RUN

Although the run is completely on concrete (probably a good race for your Hokas), it is a pretty comfortable run as Ironman runs go.  There are no major hills, but nothing in Boulder is really flat.  The run is two loops.

You’ll exit transition and head east along the creek.  You are running downhill.  Your brain may not register this fact until you turn around at mile 7 (and 20) and head back to the west.  At that point you’ll notice the slight uphill.

 

At about mile 2 (and 15), there is an out-and-back that heads south.  Once you reach the “slinky” bridge at mile 4 (and 17), you’re on a long straightaway that becomes a zombie-walk late in the race.  Don’t let this be you!  Pacing is always critical on the bike in order to have a great run so do the right amount of work throughout the race and run past a lot of folks on this stretch.

 

Once you’re back on the creek path and at the eastern turnaround, you’ll head back up to the west.  You’ll run past the high school for a little more than a mile through Eben Fine Park to the western turnaround.  The steepest section of the run is as you exit the park.  It’s short, but be aware that it’s there.  You’ll head back to the east to complete the first lap and again for the finish.

The downtown central park area will be packed with spectators and is a good place for your friends and family to get a look at you as you power past them on the run.  It’s also the place where you’ll draw a lot of energy from the big crowds.  The areas at the ends of the course (south, east, and west) tend to be pretty quiet.

Stay up on your nutrition and hydration.  Although the new June date for this race won’t likely be as hot as the previous August races, the altitude is no joke–be smart about fuel and drink.

 

Good times in Boulder!

 

Coach Dave Sheanin approaches coaching from a holistic perspective. Adult age-group triathletes typically have substantial demands in their lives outside of training and racing. Looking at any individual component of an athlete’s training (or life) is a data point, but it rarely tells the full story. I make it a priority to understand what’s going on in an athlete’s life beyond triathlon in order to build a plan that is smart, fits their lifestyle, and builds toward appropriate goals.

 

Original article on D3 Multisport here

First Look at the New Garmin Forerunner 935

By Alison Freeman

I bought my 920XT when it first came out in November, 2014. Since then, Garmin has introduced *FIVE* multisport watches: the Fenix 3, the Fenix 3 HR, the Forerunner 735XT, the Fenix 5S-5-5X, and the Forerunner 935. I’d held out as long as I could, and I finally couldn’t take it any more and upgraded.

WHY DID I CHOOSE THE 935?

I did a fair amount of research prior to ordering my Forerunner 935, mostly on the Garmin website and on DCRainmaker.com. My priorities were to find the right balance between watch size, price and battery life without giving up features like wifi that I’m accustomed to having. Oh – and to finally be able to ditch the heart rate strap that has given me some awesome permanent scarring (I’ll spare you the photos).

Ultimately, I chose the 935 over the Fenix 5S because, while I preferred the smaller size of the 5S, the battery life and price of the 935 were more important to me.

TWO WEEKS IN, WHAT DO I THINK OF THE 935?

As someone who’s been using one version or another of the square Garmin for years upon years, moving to a round Garmin was a major upgrade. It’s so light, and so thin! Even the watch band seems lighter than the 920’s. Plus, it knows it’s a watch – any time you’re not recording an activity like cycling or running it automatically reverts to a watch face.

Also, the screen resolution is significantly improved from the 920. It’s sleeker, cleaner, and more legible than the 920.

Navigation

Moving from a square to a round Garmin did take some getting used to. All the buttons on the 935 are in different places, and the up/down buttons are on the left instead of right side. When I first turned it on and started playing I kept pressing buttons and had NO IDEA what was going on. After a few minutes I started to figure it out, but it took a few days before I was fully used to navigating the new setup.

Because the 935’s navigation is more complex than the 920’s, I’ve made a point of setting up my most frequent activities as favorites as well as customizing the controls menu and hot keys so that the features I use most are quickly accessible.

Features

All of the features that I had used regularly on the 920 are still there on the 935: the full range of individual and multisport activity profiles plus several new ones, plus smart notifications, alerts, and interval training. In addition, there is a huge range of new features that I’m just starting to explore:

  • The pre-loaded Training Peaks app, which allows me to pull up and complete today’s TrainingPeaks structured workout.
  • Smart functions like displaying today’s weather and my appointment calendar (both require connection to your phone’s GarminConnect app).
  • Basic yet logical watch functions, like a timer and stopwatch.
  • A vastly expanded set of performance measurements, powered by Firstbeat.

Optical Heart Rate

By far one of my favorite upgrades is the optical heart rate feature. The 935 has a sensor on the back of the watch that continuously measures your heart rate, about once every second. Do you need to know your heart rate throughout the day? Not necessarily, but knowing and monitoring your resting heart rate can give you some insights into your recovery status, so it’s not totally useless.

Over the course of a few weeks, I’ve found that the readings from the optical heart rate monitor have generally been accurate and consistent enough that I trust the feedback I’m getting during my workouts. And you don’t have to get the heart rate data just on your watch. The optical heart rate data can be broadcast, just like a strap, so you can pick it up during a TrainerRoad or Zwift workout, on your bike computer, or on your 920.

The only downside to optical heart rate is that it the watch has to be against your skin in order to know your heart rate (duh). So if you use the optional quick release kit, you won’t get heart rate readings when the watch is on your bike (which is why I’m now using my 920 as my bike computer). Also, the 935 has to simultaneously see the sky to get a GPS signal, which can create a dilemma on cold days – so I (sadly) didn’t trash the heart rate strap from my 920. Good news is that the 935’s GPS seems to be pretty darn accurate grabbing GPS through a single layer of clothing.

Battery Life

I’ve been paying a lot of attention to battery life. I don’t think the 920 really had 24 hours of battery in GPS mode – I’m guessing it was closer to 15-16 hours, tops. So far the 935 has been promising. I fully charged the battery, and then used the 935 for a long brick (5:45 bike + 0:50 run). The battery was at 65% when I was finished. Extrapolating that information, I’m estimating the battery has about 18 to 19 hours of activity use, and even more if you set the watch up to maximize battery life. The watch should work well for any Ironman-distance athlete, and could even possibly survive a 100-mile ultra run.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?

The 935 is not easy to track down. Most retailers don’t have them in stock for a same-day purchase or, more importantly, to take a peek before you pull the trigger. And as of the writing of this review, most on-line retailers are out of stock. Your best bet may be to ask your local multisport or cycling shop to special order the watch for you,

Mike Reilly, Mirinda Carfrae, Timothy O’Donnell lead 2017 Ironman Foundation Ambassador Team

Ironman today announced it’s 18-member Ambassador team – including 303’s own Khem Suthiwan!

Ambassadors to support service projects in eight IRONMAN North American race communities

TAMPA, Fla. (May 8, 2017) – The IRONMAN Foundation® today announced that the 2017 IMF Ambassador Team comprising 18 age-group triathletes from around the United States will be led by Team Captain and “Voice of IRONMAN” Mike Reilly as well as by pro triathletes Mirinda Carfrae, a three-time IRONMAN World Champion, and Timothy O’Donnell, a multi-year IRONMAN® World Championship top ten finisher. To support The Foundation’s mission to create tangible impact in IRONMAN race communities through philanthropy and volunteerism, the ambassadors will focus their efforts on The Foundation’s eight service projects in North America.

Each service project is conducted in partnership with a local nonprofit organization, powerfully linking IRONMAN athletes and TriClubs to the local race community. At the 2017 IRONMAN® 70.3® Oceanside triathlon, an adaptive surf clinic for children with physical challenges was held with the Challenged Athletes Foundation. At the 2017 IRONMAN North American Championship Texas triathlon, a local disabled senior received a new roof and volunteers helped restore the exterior of her home with Rebuilding Together Houston.

“It’s an extraordinary moment when an IRONMAN athlete has the opportunity to connect directly with the cause they support and make a difference in their race community,” said Sarah Hartmann, Community Relations Manager for the IRONMAN Foundation. “Our 2017 Team IMF Ambassador Team truly embodies our mantra of ‘Service Through Sport and Commitment to Community.’”

Additional service projects include flood restoration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Friends of Lake Sonoma at IRONMAN 70.3 Santa Rosa, an adaptive climbing clinic and trail maintenance with Paradox Sports at IRONMAN Boulder, a race week hands-only CPR training with the American Red Cross at IRONMAN Lake Placid, and a day of service with the Salt River Children’s Foundation at IRONMAN Arizona. Two additional projects are planned for the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship and IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship events.

“I’m extremely proud to represent the IRONMAN Foundation this season as the captain of the IMF Ambassador Team,” said Mike Reilly, Voice of IRONMAN. “This team has a unique opportunity to connect with our local race communities and give back through sport. The IRONMAN Foundation athletes give of themselves in order for others to achieve, there is no greater honor!”

The 2017 Team IMF Ambassadors are:

Mike Reilly, San Diego, CA

Mirinda Carfrae, Boulder, CO

Timothy O’Donnell, Boulder, CO

Peter Anderson, Portland, ME

Melissa Bowman, Chicago, IL

Louis Burns, Granite Bay, CA

Diana Cohen, Columbia, CT

Kevin Edmonds, College Park, GA

Shay Eskew, Brentwood, TN

Stephanie Felber, Elgin, IL

Woodrow Freese, Newton, MA

Daniel Giblin, Rochester, NY

Sheila Hiestand, Louisville, KY

Alex Holderness, Denver, CO

Terry Klise, Missoula, MT

Bryan Lam, El Cerrito, CA

Robert Maar, Plainfield, IN

John McGrath, Paradise Valley, AZ

Ed Shifflet, Swarthmore, PA

John Snyder, Leawood, KS

Khem Suthiwan, Denver, CO

For more information on each service project and how you can get involved, please visit Here.

How to Recover like a Pro

From Boulder Sports Clinic

As an athlete of any kind, we are always pushing the limits of our body. Workouts break us down. In order to reach the finish line of our next race we need our body to adapt to the stress of training.

Have you ever been sore after a workout? Of course! That soreness is a sign that you’ve successfully broken down muscle tissue during your activity that is required to become better, faster, and stronger.

We frequently read about the latest training recommendations in the world, which claim to shape you into a better athlete: training supplements, nutritional fads, ice baths, muscle rubs, compression garments, and stretching……

 

What is the optimal recovery routine? To answer that question we sat down with top American professional triathlete Justin Metzler.

In addition to year-round training, Justin raced twelve 70.3s, or half Ironman distance triathlons last year on five continents with multiple podium finishes. This level of consistent racing requires massive weekly hours of swimming, biking, and running with many of those days having multiple training sessions. In order to recover from one session enough to hit the next just as hard, he has dialed in the most effective recovery tools-and he is sharing his secrets with us.

How do you recover from a typical training session?

Immediately following a training session or race I have a recovery drink. Regardless of the type of session or which sport, any type of workout will break down muscle and deplete glycogen stores. My immediate goal is to replenish the glycogen and supply my body with the amino acids it needs to rebuild the muscle I just broke down. After trying a lot of different flavors and brands, I prefer First Endurance Ultragen. It has the optimal balance of carbohydrate to protein in addition to a number of essential vitamins and minerals to help rebuild for the next session. Not to mention, it tastes great!

When I can, I tend to structure the training to have enough down time in between the workouts to allow me to relax, put my feet up, and grab some food. In between sessions I am primarily focusing on foods high in protein and nutrient density. Some examples include lean meats, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables.

What is a typical routine after your training is completely done for the day?

After the training is done I try to relax, answer emails, talk with my nutrition and coaching clients, and make a healthful dinner with my girlfriend- fellow professional triathlete, Jeanni Seymour. Just like everyone else, our day-to-day is quite busy and we often are out training from dawn to dusk. But we always try to make dinner a time that we can cook together, eat together and catch up on the days activities. Once or twice a week, we have a glass of red wine to help relax!

Before bed, I always try to use my Normatec boots for somewhere between 30-60 minutes. On harder days I go for less time at a softer setting. On easier days I bump up the intensity and sit in them for a bit longer. The boots are a great tool to aid in recovery but I try not to disrupt my body’s natural recovery process.

I always have some form of protein before bed. Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, or whey protein are my ‘go-to’s. The protein helps give my body what it needs recover over night, the time when the majority of your recovery gains will be made. People often overlook the fact that your ability to improve is dictated by your ability to absorb training load. So recovery is equally important to any hard training session that you may do.

How much sleep do you get each night?

As I mentioned, sleep is a big priority for me. I have spent the money necessary to have a great mattress, sound machine, ear plugs, etc in order to try to get the most quality sleep I can every night. I aim to get 8-10 hours a night, and I don’t usually nap unless I fail to get my normal amount of sleep.

Do you have recovery days built into your training plan?

My training is structured to have some days of active recovery. On recovery days, I use the lighter workouts as a warm up for any foam rolling, stretching, or rehab exercises I may need to focus on. I also try to schedule chiropractic and massage appointments every week to help address any small issues before they become something I actually have to worry about.

Do you take any supplements?

The only supplements I take are fish oil (I like the KLEAN or Zone Labs brands) and a multivitamin (First Endurance multi-v is my favorite). As a professional who gets drug tested regularly, I watch what I consume carefully. I find that with a proper healthful diet, most people don’t need many supplements. Shoot for a minimum of four fruits and four vegetables every day.

What is the one piece of advice you would give to any runner or triathlete about recovery?

Nail your nutrition. You should have just as much importance placed on fueling correctly as you do building a training schedule. The worst thing to happen to any endurance athlete in a race is hitting the wall and having to slow down or get the dreaded DNF.

In every workout you use stored glycogen for fuel. If you deplete the glycogen stores you hit the wall. To fully come back from depleting your stores, it takes days or weeks. This means your next workouts suffer or you’re not able to complete them.

The key is to never let your glycogen stores get too low. Think of it like the fuel gage on your car. Try to never let it dip below 25-50% capacity.

I try to have a form of carbohydrates every 30 minutes during a workout. A gel, half a bar, banana, or sports drink, helps to make sure my “fuel tank” never falls below the level I am shooting for.

How does Boulder Sports Chiropractic help you?

It is so important to stay on top of injury risk. My body is my livelihood and if I’m injured, I can’t race! Getting weekly treatments to focus on any tightness I may have from shoulder pain to calf tightness keeps me from having any injury set backs. I love the Active Release Technique and dry needling. In addition to massage and rehab; chiropractic care and the modalities Boulder Sports Chiropractic rely on are a critical part to my body work protocol.

More about Justin…

In addition to professional triathlon, Justin has a degree in human physiology and nutrition. He has a unique set of skills developed through hours in the classroom paired with 10 years of multisport experience. When he is not training, he helps athletes like you build customized nutrition plans to address any weakness in training, racing or general body composition.

Services Justin offers: one-on-one monthly coaching, race specific training plans, race nutrition strategies, race weight planning, daily nutrition strategies for optimal body composition and general nutrition guidelines.

If you feel like you could benefit from building a proper nutrition plan for training/racing, or to learn more about the services that Justin offers, contact him at:

Contact Justin

At Boulder Sports Chiropractic, we use movement screens to biomechanically evaluate how your whole body is moving and how it works together.We use the best techniques to address your source of pain and dysfunction including Active Release Technique, Graston, and Dry Needling.

We send every patient home with the rehab exercises or stretches to give you the tools to fix the problem, not just treat the symptoms! Contact us today to schedule your appointment.

Weekend Preview: Watch the Weather

Triathlon Events

Thursday April 27th

 

Heels on Wheels – Ladies Only

Campus Cycles, Denver


Friday April 28th

 

Bicycle Colorado Gala

Denver


Saturday April 29th

 

Team Colorado Weekly Ride

Boulder


Alison Dunlap Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Silver Creek High School Raptor Run 5k

Longmont


USAT Long Course Duathlon National Championships

North Carolina


Sunday April 30th

 

Rocky Mountain State Games – Indoor Triathlon

Colorado Springs


Crested Butte Pole, Pedal, Paddle

Crested Butte


Alison Dunlap Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


IRONMAN Team Colorado Training Run & Social

Louisville

 



 

Cycling Events

Thursday April 27th

 

Heels on Wheels – Ladies Only

Campus Cycles, Denver


Fruita Fat Tire Festival

Fruita


USAC Para-cycling  Road National Championships

Grand Junction


USAC Collegiate Road National Championships

Grand Junction


Friday April 28th

 

Bicycle Colorado Gala

Denver


Women’s Level 1 MTB Skills Clinic with Amy Shenton

Boulder


Fruita Fat Tire Festival

Fruita


USAC Para-cycling  Road National Championships

Grand Junction


USAC Collegiate Road National Championships

Grand Junction


Saturday April 29th

 

Ridgeline Rampage

Castle Rock

 

This unique, 16-mile racecourse linking the Miller Athletic Complex and the Ridgeline Open Space Trail System is a one-of-a-kind, phenomenal way to kick off the season in style.  We’ll have plenty of aid stations, treats and hydration around the course to keep you fueled.  Awards and after-party will be on the grassy lawn at the finish line!

In addition to the race, there will be activities for spectators, kids and families with hula-hoops, beach balls, badminton, food truck and more!

New this year – We are offering FREE Junior racing for ages 10-18. That’s right, just pre-register on-line for a FREE Junior entry, or sign up on race day for only $10 bucks!


Alison Dunlap Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Fruita Fat Tire Festival

Fruita


Giant & Liv Demo Day

Boulder


GiddyUP! Film Tour

Salida


USAC Para-cycling  Road National Championships

Grand Junction


USAC Collegiate Road National Championships

Grand Junction

 


Sunday April 30th

 

Koppenberg Road Race – delayed start time

Superior


Fruita Fat Tire Festival

Fruita


Alison Dunlap Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs

 


USAC Para-cycling  Road National Championships

Grand Junction

USAC Collegiate Road National Championships

Grand Junction

IRONMAN World Championships

Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

 

The inaugural Hawaiian IRON MAN Triathlon was conceptualized in 1977 as a way to challenge athletes who had seen success at endurance swim, running and biathlon events. Honolulu-based Navy couple Judy and John Collins proposed combining the three toughest endurance races in Hawai’i—the 2.4-mile Waikiki Roughwater Swim, 112 miles of the Around-O’ahu Bike Race and the 26.2-mile Honolulu Marathon—into one event.

On February 18, 1978, 15 people came to Waikiki to take on the IRONMAN challenge. Prior to racing, each received three sheets of paper with a few rules and a course description. The last page read: “Swim 2.4 miles! Bike 112 miles! Run 26.2 miles! Brag for the rest of your life!”

In 1981, the race moved from the tranquil shores of Waikiki to the barren lava fields of Kona on the Big Island of Hawai’i. Along the Kona Coast, black lava rock dominates the panorama, and athletes battle the “ho’omumuku” crosswinds of 45 mph, 95-degree temperatures and a scorching sun.

The IRONMAN World Championship centers on the dedication and courage exhibited by participants who demonstrate the IRONMAN mantra that ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE.® On October 14th, over 2,000 athletes will embark on a 140.6-mile journey that presents the ultimate test of body, mind and spirit to earn the title of IRONMAN.

 

Event details here

Weekend Preview: Get Your Fix

Triathlon Events

Friday April 21st

 

2017 USAT High School Triathlon National Championships

Tuscaloosa, Alabama


2017 USAT Collegiate Club Triathlon National Championships

Tuscaloosa, Alabama


 

Saturday April 22nd

 

2017 USAT Collegiate Club Triathlon National Championships

Tuscaloosa, Alabama


Team Colorado Weekly Ride

Tom Watson Park, Boulder


2017 CS Bike Swap

Colorado Springs


 

Sunday April 23rd

 

Three Creeks Half Marathon

Cherry Creek State Park



Cycling Events

Saturday April 22nd

 

Sea Otter Classic

Monterey, Ca


Clasica de Rio Grande

Johnstown


FLC Squawker Road Classic

Durango


Junior Track Clinic

Colorado Springs


2017 CS Bike Swap

Colorado Springs


 

Sunday April 23rd

 

Louisville Criterium

Louisville

 

Kick off the spring season this April at one of the fastest races in Colorado.  Louisville offers fast flowing corners, a power incline, and wide open roads to really put the hammer down!  Come shake off the rust and open up the throttle at the Louisville Criterium!

We’ll have great prizes from our sponsors, plus a lively expo to keep spectators well fed, caffeinated, and entertained!  Let’s kick off the 2017 Colorado Cycling Season in style!


BRAC Women’s Mentoring Clinic

Louisville

 

In conjunction with the Louisville Criteium.  This BRAC sponsored clinic is FREE to women of all ages and ability.  Join us to kick off the 2017 racing season with a fun and informative clinic!


GiddyUP! Film Tour

Mercury Cafe, Denver

 

This special performance will benefit the Front Rangers Cycling Club, a Metro Denver nonprofit that has been putting kids on bikes since 1993.  The FRCC have 2 important programs for youth: an outreach program in collaboration with Denver Police Department that takes disadvantaged youth on a bicycle rides and outings once a month; and a junior cycling team that meets weekly providing an opportunity for youth train and race road, mountain bike and cyclocross.


Sea Otter Classic

Monterey, Ca


Junior Track Clinic

Colorado Springs


FLC Squawker Road Classic

Durango

 

Do you Strava? Join Team Colorado & win prizes!

Boulder, Colorado, USA – Mike Ricci & Jim Hallberg: D3 Multisport

Author: Bill Plock

Do you Strava? Yet another verb in our language morphing from a website (i.e. googling). Join the Team Colorado Strava group and you can be eligible to win prizes for completing the D3 Multisport segment within the Ironman Boulder bike route. The segment essentially starts at 63rd and Nelson Rd., heads West to highway 36, then North to St. Vrain and East to 65th and south back to Nelson Rd.

D3 and some of their partners including; Rudy Project, Infinit, Colorado Nutrition, Pro Bike Express, and Lock Laces will be giving away products to athletes who complete the D3 segment in the month of April. You need to join the Team Colorado Strava group to be eligible—and ride your bike between Arpil 7th and April 30th—that’s it! Click here to join

This isn’t about coveted KOM or QOM’s (king and queen of the mountain) but rather participating. Team Colorado is initiative started by Ironman Boulder to build a stronger community feel at their race in June. It’s morphing to be an inclusive group encouraging athletes to be more engaging and have fun training. All clubs, athletes, groups and individuals are welcome at events.

Most of the prizes will be given at the Team Colorado picnic scheduled for Sunday afternoon on April 30th at the Ironman office/warehouse in Louisville. There, food and beverages will be available along with some great advice from experts of D3 Multisport along with other fun events and a chance to see some of the behind the scene happenings on how a triathlon is put together. The Ironman warehouse in Boulder is the staging place for everything needed for all of their North American events. Families will be encourage to join the picnic!

Ironman: Calling All Women Who Tri

Women For Tri is looking for one inspirational woman to tell her story, raise support, and inspire other women to Tri as she represents us at the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii!

The purpose of the Women for Tri IRONMAN® World Championship Slot 2017 is two-fold: (1) to support a female IRONMAN triathlete who embodies the spirit of Women for Tri at the 2017 IRONMAN® World Championship, and (2) to raise at least $25,000 in support of Women for Tri charitable programs. Do you want to make a tangible positive impact on the lives of female athletes like yourself?

Apply here by April 15, 2017 at 11:59pm.

11 Ways to get to Kona

For long-course triathletes, the IRONMAN World Championship is the pot of gold at the end of a rewarding season of training. Here’s your roadmap.

Every year, more than 2,200 hard-working athletes have the chance to compete at the iconic IRONMAN World Championship on the Island of Hawai’i. It was there that Dave Scott and Mark Allen battled head to head in 1989’s “Iron War.”

It was there that IRONMAN legend Paula Newby-Fraser earned her historic eight victories. It continues to be where thousands of athletes have overcome illness and injury, fighting through their own—or sometimes others’—mental, emotional, and physical hardships.

The historic finish line on Ali’i Drive has become synonymous with big dreams, and even bigger accomplishments. It is the place where the IRONMAN mantra, “ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE”, pulses to the beat of the Hawaiian drum.

And we want to help you get there.

  1. Standard qualification: Every year, age-group athletes compete in full-distance races globally for one of only a handful of highly coveted slots to the IRONMAN World Championship. This route demands a lot of blood, sweat, and sometimes tears, as athletes compete against their fellow age-groupers for slots. Each of the 40 full-distance IRONMAN races in the 2017 qualifying series offers a different number of Kona qualification slots, which are then divided up according to the size of their respective age-group
  2. Qualify in China: Once again, this year our IRONMAN 70.3 races in China will be the only half-distance events where athletes can qualify for Kona. Pick a race, and get planning, you’re in for a treat:IRONMAN 70.3 Liuzhou: April 1, 2017—30 qualifying slots.
    IRONMAN 70.3 Qujing: August 27, 2017—30 qualifying slots.
  3. IRONMAN Legacy Program: The IRONMAN Legacy Program, now in its sixth year, rewards our most loyal athletes with a chance to compete in Kona. These athletes became eligible for selection based on a) completed a minimum of 12 full-distance IRONMAN races; b) never started the iconic IRONMAN World Championship; c) have completed at least one IRONMAN event in each of the 2015 and 2016 seasons; and d) be registered for an IRONMAN event in 2017. This year, we have added 100 additional Legacy slots to the annual 100, for a total of 200.
  4. IRONMAN Kona Drawing benefiting The IRONMAN Foundation: This year, The IRONMAN Foundation is offering a drawing for 10 slots, with a suggested (tax deductible) donation of $50.00 to benefit the Foundation’s charitable giveback in communities around the world. The drawing will begin on Friday, February 24, 2017, and finish on Friday, March 24, 2017 at 12 pm ET . Selected athletes will be announced on Friday, March 31. Click here to enter the drawing.Related Article: 39 Things You Didn’t Know About Kona
  5. Physically Challenged Open/Exhibition Division Drawing: To honor the vision of IRONMAN co-founders, John and Judy Collins, IRONMAN remains committed to providing athletes of all abilities a means of entry to the world’s most challenging and prestigious one-day endurance event. Through the Physically Challenged Open/Exhibition Division Drawing, five physically challenged athletes from around the world will be drawn to receive entry to the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship. Further guidelines and registration information can be found at ironman.com/pcdrawing.
  6. IRONMAN Foundation annual Kona auction: Beginning on April 1, 2017, one slot will be auctioned off each week for five weeks on eBay. The first four slots will benefit the IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund and will be 100 percent tax deductible less the value of the race registration (minimum opening bid of $25,000). Visit the IRONMAN Foundation website for more information. For the second year, The IRONMAN Foundation will offer a fifth slot (also 100 percent tax deductible) with 100 percent of the funds going to support Women For Tri — a program of the IRONMAN Foundation that works to increase female participation at all levels of triathlon (minimum opening bid of $25,000).
  7. Women For Tri slots: The Women For Tri initiative will also allocate one additional slot to a female triathlete who both a) embodies the spirit of Women For Tri through a compelling personal story that motivates and inspires other women to “Tri”; and b) raises or contributes at least $25,000 to the Women For Tri charitable, tax-deductible effort. This slot will be distributed via an application process. Additional details are available at the IRONMAN Foundation website.
  8. IRONMAN Executive Challenge: With 25 slots set aside for the IRONMAN World Championship, IRONMAN XC creates a true competition among peers at XC qualifying events, with top performers awarded IRONMAN World Championship slots. The program brings together executives at select events around the globe for a unique and ultra-personalized IRONMAN race weekend experience. This turn-key program streamlines all logistics surrounding an IRONMAN event and provide a white glove level of service. Additionally, family and guests experience VIP treatment throughout event weekend with a front row seat to all the action.
  9. Bonus Kona slots: This year, bonus slots to the IRONMAN World Championship were allocated to a few select races in different regions. Ten lucky athletes won the chance to race at Kona via a drawing relating to IRONMAN Boulder, taking place on June 11. IRONMAN Australia, taking place on May 7, 2017, provided a similar promotion with 10 entries to Kona. In the coming weeks, information will be provided on on a special opportunity for athletes racing at IRONMAN Maastricht – Limburg on August 6, 2017.
  10. Japan to Whistler to Kona! This year, an additional 20 qualifying slots to the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona, Hawai’i, are up for grabs for Japanese nationals racing IRONMAN Canada. These slots will be allocated based on the athlete’s Age-Group Ranking upon conclusion of the race. Click here for more information.
  11. IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii, Honu to Kona: Thanks to the Island of Hawai’i Visitor’s Bureau, 10 Kona slots are on offer to anyone who registers for IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii by May 1, 2017. Click here for more information.