Women’s Wednesday: Pros v. Amos, Tri-Style – featuring Gwen Jorgensen, Alicia Kaye, aaaaaaaand Katie Macarelli!

Photo: Pro Velo Passion

By Dana Willett

A little back-history of Pro’s vs Amo’s:

These events go back to the summer of 2014 when we had the 1st “Pro’s vs “Amos” contest (“amos” is just a rhyming abbreviation for “amateurs”). There was a chocolate chip cookie bake-off followed by a dodge ball tournament. There was laughter and tears. *It was mostly the laughing and the cookies that inspired us to keep this “challenge” going.

Since then we’ve invited many strong, fun women to join in on the shenanigans. While the cast of women is ever changing (life happens), the spirit of this event never will. This will always be a somewhat silly celebration of the pure joy we all have for our sport.

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Pros & Amos: Tri-Style

In a digital-cyber-y version of 303’s famous Pros v. Amos challenges, we pit famous local “Amo” Katie Macarelli opposite a couple “Pro” athletes you may have heard of… Olympic World Champion Gwen Jorgensen & Professional Triathlete Alicia Kaye! And we’re talking about how Pros live their athletic lives and learn their lessons, compared to Amos… What it’s like as a female role model, mistakes they’ve made, and how they’ve overcome obstacles along the path to stardom… Read on to find out who’s a brainiac with multiple degrees… who hurdles barbed wire fences with ease… and who’s favorite prize ever was 20 pounds of steak.

Here’s some background:

GWEN JORGENSEN
Gwen Jorgensen is a professional triathlete from St Paul, MN. Gwen is a 2x Olympian, 2x World Champion (2014, 2015), and 17x ITU World Triathlon Series race winner. She also likes to read, try new foods, and hang out with friends and family.

Career Highlights:

    • 2016 Olympic Champion
      2015 World Champion
      2014 World Champion
      2012 U.S. Olympic Team Member
      2013 USA Triathlon’s Triathlete of the Year
      2014 USA Triathlon’s Triathlete of the Year
      2015 USA Elite National Champion
      2014 USA Elite National Champion
      2013 USAT Elite National Champion (Sprint and Olympic Distance)
      First USA Woman to win a World Triathlon Series race
      15-time ITU World Triathlon Series Winner
      2010 USAT Rookie of the Year
      2010 USAT Elite Duathlete of the Year

ALICIA KAYE
Alicia grew up in Canada and began participating in triathlon when she was 11 years old; she became a professional triathlete at the age of 14. Alicia spent her teen years racing triathlon while juggling her academic studies. While completing her undergraduate degree in Sport Psychology she met fellow triathlete and now husband, Jarrod Shoemaker. Since meeting Jarrod she has began racing for the United States and also completed her masters degree in Athletic Counseling. Some of Alicia’s proudest moments include winning Canadian Junior National Championships in 2001, and winning the St. Anthony’s Triathlon in 2013. In her spare time Alicia works as a mental trainer and runs a skincare company with her husband Jarrod, called Endurance Shield.

 

And our “Amo,” KATIE MACARELLI
Katie is a Colorado native who grew up on a dairy farm on the Eastern Plains. She got her start in the Colorado cycling scene competing in triathlons for about five years until she realized that running is the worst. She’s a mom of two teenage girls, a year-round bike commuter who hates driving but loves cyclocross. She is currently the marketing manager for Feedback Sports.

 

 

Here we go!
1. Have you ever googled yourself? Any oft-repeated MISconceptions out there that you’d like to clear up? Any rumor or tall tale that just keeps popping up on Wikipedia? Here’s your chance to set the record straight. And if not, give us your best pretend fake fact.

GJ:  I’ve googled my husband, Patrick Lemieux, but don’t google myself. I think one thing people may assume is that I come from a running background, however I actually come from a swimming background and didn’t start running until I was a junior in college.

AK: Yes, I’ve googled myself. It almost always just to find an image or to find articles written about a recent race. Maybe once every few years I’ll look to see if anyone is saying something mean or false, but I’ve never found anything truly negative.

KM: ​I work in the digital marketing realm, so of COURSE I have. The only misconception I’ve ever found was an article that listed me as living in Portland. I’ve never actually been to Portland, but it sounds lovely. *I generally disregard everything past page 5 on google, because it’s like reading the comments on Pinkbike. It will just make you mad and/or confused.

2. How has your rise to fame affected your performances? Has there ever been a time when the spotlight really helped you? Or worked against you?

GJ: I am an introvert, so it took some time to get used to the media attention and fans walking up to me. I now enjoy being able to share my experiences, but still need my alone time to recharge.
In 2012, after I qualified for the Olympics I had a bunch of media engagements lined up for the week of a WTS race in San Diego. I did an all day photo shoot along with other media the week leading into the race and I believe this contributed to my poor performance. I think I almost finished dead last.

Photo: Finisher Pix

AK: I had my breakout year in 2013 winning the Lifetime Series and Toyota Triple Crown. I thought it would be this ultra grand moment where everything would change. But life went on as normal, the money and/ or result didn’t change any of my relationships- we were just able to make a big fat mortgage payment instead;) What was interesting was in 2014 I really struggled to find purpose and meaning after achieving all my goals in 2013, trying to replicate them again in 2014 was an entirely different experience.

KM: I’m not famous, but I do find it hard to get to the start line to any race because I often stop to hug, heckle and/or say hello to friends. As it turns out, missing the start of a race directly impacts your performance.

 

3. Please provide five single-word adjectives that best describe you and what makes you tick.

GJ: Stubborn. Disciplined. Focused. Driven. Foodie.

AK: Even-tempered. Leader. Brave. Disciplined. Joyful.

KM: Enthusiastic. Loud. Empathetic. Droll. Indefatigable. (You said single-word, so I didn’t think I could use “over-caffeinated”)

4. Have you experienced being asked media questions different from your male counterparts that you attribute to gender? What’s your best example?

GJ: Can’t think of one off the top of my head, but I also try not to read into questions too much. I also have a poor memory so may have been asked something but have forgotten. I do believe there should be equal prize money for men and women (which there is in ITU which I love).

AK: This is a great question, I think our sport is pretty good about equality but the biggest gender difference I notice is that it’s ALWAYS the male winners picture in a newspaper article. Media outlets within our sport tend to include pictures of the women’s winner and why is the men’s race always written about first?

KM: No, because the media isn’t interested in me. However, I’ve been in many eye-rolling situations as a female working in a male dominated industry. I feel our industry (and society in general)​ is getting better about this but I still got called “Hon” only a few months ago by a guy my age who was visiting our office. I can assure you that I’m not his “Hon.”

5. What is the best PRIZE you’ve ever won, in your entire life of racing (maybe it was that 2nd grade field day ribbon…)?

GJ: Any prize that involves food! In 2015 I won a gravel road race and won 20lbs of steak.

AK: I won a race down in Tobago a LONG time ago, back in 2005 I think. The trophy was a beautiful wooden carved sea turtle, it’s still hanging on my wall at home.

KM: I won a pair of Tough Girl socks and a pint glass for 3rd place in my first ever Cx race (I raced it on my full suspension Yeti 575). I was instantly in love with cyclocross and bought a Cx bike about 4 months later

6. Race Day prep – name three best practices you always adhere to the night before a race… and three things you always avoid. What is your best example of a time you didn’t follow your own rules, and things fell apart?

GJ: Don’t try anything new (once I ate out in Japan and tried a dish I’d never had before and got food poisoning)
-Relax/put my feet up
-Do openers
-Avoid: unnecessary stress, being on your feet all day, and new foods.

AK: I don’t go to bed until I feel sleepy, I eat the same thing (chicken and rice) and I prepare everything the night before leaving race morning to be fairly stress free. Three things I always avoid the night before a race are any foods that contain caffeine, any foods high in fiber, anything my body isn’t used to.

KM: Hahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. Race prep. That’s funny. Here are my “3 best practices”:

-Start looking for my wetsuit​ at about 10 pm​. and run a load of laundry.
-Eat a bowl of Peanut Butter Panda Puffs and pack my bag in the dark so I don’t wake my family.
-Get a good, solid 4 hours of sleep.

Three things I avoid ​(d​ue to life in general plus an incessant desire to self-sabotage):
-Dialed logistics. ​
-Consistent, focused athletic ​training.
-Having enough ______________ to make success an option (fill in the blank with any of the following: sleep, water, food, peace of mind, clean clothes, gas in the car etc)

Best example of things falling apart:
An example where things went wrong: Pretty much every race I’ve done since I turned 35. ​Recently, I had to hop a barbed-wire fence and run through a ditch to find the start-line. Good thing I grew up on a farm.

7. If you’re a Pro, do you ever find yourself wishing you were an Amateur? And if you’re an Amateur, every wish you were a Pro? Why?

GJ: I love what I do and am thrilled to be able to also make it my living. I do hate training when the body is tired and it is pouring rain outside.

AK: I went pro at such an early age that I almost can’t remember what it’s like to race as an amateur. Triathlon has been my life since I was 14 years old, and I began participating in them at 11. I think what I’ll miss when I don’t race as a pro someday is a clear course!

KM: Nope. Waaaaay too much pressure. I race because it helps me conquer my fears, which is a good example for my daughters and other women. Oh, and also: its good preparation should things go south and we find ourselves in a post-Apocalyptic scenario.  If I had to do that as a job, I’d undoubtedly get fired.

Want to know more about Alicia, Gwen and Katie?

Follow their careers:

Alicia Kaye

Gwen Jorgensen

Katie Macarelli – Feedback Sports

Feedback’s tiny trainer a favorite among pro triathletes

Helle Fredericksen uses the trainer in a hotel room at the Island House Invitational.

From Triathlete Magazine

Feedback Sports’ Omnium portable resistance trainer makes traveling easier.

Golden, Colo.-based Feedback Sports built its reputation on making the very best in bicycle repair equipment. Work stands, tool kits and bike racks are its bread and butter. But when company founder Doug Hudson met a machine shop owner with an engineering background who showed him a two-drum, fork mount, foldable trainer, Hudson couldn’t resist getting into stationary trainers. He loved the smooth rolling drums and the progressive resistance magnets hidden inside the cylinders. He kept and patented those features on the Omnium, this little marvel of flight-friendly gear.

The front half was re-engineered to make it fold to stow like Feedback work stands. It’s just over two feet long folded up and weighs under 14 pounds. Feedback says in its tote bag, the Omnium is an easy carry-on. In fact, Feedback staffers have field-tested this claim by flying with the Omnium, successfully clearing TSA checks and slipping it into overhead compartments. It’s an ideal piece of equipment for triathletes traveling with their bikes; Gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen set one up on her balcony in Rio, and Helle Frederiksen stayed loose on an Omnium in her hotel room while prepping to race the Island House Tri in the Bahamas.

Read more

Gwen Jorgensen Meets With Colorado Springs Triathletes

Gwen Jorgensen made a last minute appearance at 24Hr Fitness in Colorado Springs last weekend. Kris Kuckenbacker, a triathlete from Colorado Springs, describes his experience for us:

Gwen Jorgensen posing for a photo with triathletes while visiting Colorado SpringsI first found out that Gwen was going to be at the COS 24Hr Fitness Thursday morning (November 10th) from the local tri club social media page, just two days before the meet and greet was to occur. It was a very basic post and just said “Gwen Jorgensen will be at 24 Hour Fitness in Colorado Springs this Saturday,” that was it. I searched the comments and was further able to find out that it would be from 11:30-1:00. Oh Great!

That was the exact same 90 minute window I had a scheduled a massage for earlier in the week. Skeptical, I searched online to see if I could verify the information and came up empty. Regardless, I rescheduled the massage and decided to go to the gym the following day and see what the deal was myself. Sure enough, a large poster was on the entrance window with Gwen’s photo and pertinent details for the meet and greet. I was excited!

My girlfriend, and fellow triathlete, was down from Denver for the weekend and was just as excited as I was for such an amazing opportunity to meet the ITU legend and Olympic Gold Medalist. We took magazines, the recent USA Triathlon quarterly publication and the The magazine Gwen Jorgensen signed for Kris during her visit to Colorado SpringsAugust issue of Triathlete, both with Gwen’s picture gracing the covers for her to sign.

I’ve never met anyone and had them autograph their picture before, that added a little awkwardness while standing in line. We were surprised how few people were there, which was a good thing as neither of us are fans of large crowds.

The moment came and we walked up to Gwen. I got increasingly nervous as we approached and realized I wasn’t in any way prepared for a verbal encounter. I stayed a few steps behind my girlfriend, trying to hide behind her tiny frame, as she engaged in conversation with a very humble and genuine Gwen Jorgensen. They started with a little race and triathlon small talk which transitioned seamlessly and quickly into real life events and girl stuff as though they were long time friends.

When her attention turned to me, I shook her hand and introduced myself in which she replied “Hi, I’m Gwen.” All I could muster as a response was “Yes, yes you are”. I was literally speechless and embarrassed. We got our magazines signed pictures taken with Gwen, then headed to brunch. All we could talk about was how amazing it was to meet such an icon of the sport, and how authentic and real Gwen was to everyone she met.