The Sprint Work Stand by Feedback Sports : No More Grease Stains on My Carpet When I Change a Tire?

By Alison Freeman

You know when you’ve been struggling with something over and over and over again, and you get so used to clunky and difficult and annoying that you never pick your head up to think about alternative solutions? That pretty much describes me, in my basement, swapping out trainer tire for outdoor tire for trainer tire for outdoor tire, getting chain grease all over the carpet, and just assuming that this is how it’s done. And then I learned about the Sprint Work Stand by Feedback Sports.
TAAAHHH-DAAAHHH!!! Light bulb does not even begin to describe it.

WHAT IS IT?
The Sprint Work Stand by Feedback Sports  is a bike work and wash stand. Unlike the work stands that you often see at your local bike shop that use a seat post or top tube clamp to hold your bike, the Sprint Work Stand uses a fork mount to secure and stabilize your baby. I mean bike.

WHY SHOULD YOU CARE?
For starters, I am now convinced that anyone who does any work on their own bike – tire changes included – should own a work stand. If my grease-on-the-carpet story didn’t resonate with you, how about the fact that my race wheels stayed on my bike for 8 weeks because there wasn’t a day warm enough to pop my bike on my car’s bike rack and swap out wheels. Does that sound familiar? Now just imagine changing wheels and mounting rear bottle cages, all in the comfort and warmth of your house – without getting grease everywhere. SOLD, right?

Glad that we’re on the same page. So, then, the reason that you want the Sprint Stand specifically is because, since it uses a fork mount, you don’t have to stress about the top tube shape of this bike and the seat post shape of that bike and is there any one stand that will work with all of my bikes? Yes! The Sprint Work Stand. DOUBLE SOLD!

HOW DOES IT WORK?
The Sprint Stand is a cinch to use. Even though I only glanced at the directions the first time I whipped it out to change my daughter’s tire, I had it set up in just a minute or two. The stand uses four clamps similar to the clamps on your bike’s seat post to manage the entire setup and breakdown process, which makes everything quick and easy.

You open one clamp to expand the tripod base, a few others to adjust the height of the stand, and then there’s a nifty clamp to lock the horizontal mounting bar in place. Just like that, the stand is set up. To mount your bike, you simply remove the front wheel and throw it on the fork mount using one of the three provided skewers and their accompanying spacers. The fork mount has a slide adjustment, so once your bike is mounted you can easily slip the fork mount forward or backward so that your bottom bracket rests on the rubber base.

Once you’ve got your bike mounted, you can rotate it 360 degrees to provide easy access to whichever part of your bike you’re working on. In just a few weeks, I’ve used it to change tires, swap out wheels, wash my bike and un-attach my rear bottle system. Previously I would’ve attempted this with my bike either on the car’s bike rack or leaning against the wall in my basement, neither of which provides the same access or stability as the Sprint Work Stand. My bike was super sturdy once cinched into the fork mount and, with the rotation and adjustable height, I could easily get to anything I wanted to work on. The only two drawbacks were that my hands still got greasy dealing with my chain (granted, that’s totally a user error thing) and that you can’t adjust the front brakes on the stand since the front wheel isn’t on your bike. It’s easy enough to adjust those brakes once you pop the wheel back on, though, so it’s really not a big deal.

Once you’re done working on your bike, the stand folds down more easily and quickly than it sets up, and collapses into a compact unit that you can easily tuck away in your garage or the corner of your pain cave. It’s only been a couple of weeks, I’ve already used it several times, and I really don’t know how or why I managed to go this long without scooping one up.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?
The Sprint Work Stand is available direct through Feedback Sports for $269.99 plus tax and shipping.

Feedback Omnium featured in Tiny House

From USA Triathlon

Olympian Katie Zaferes and husband and fellow elite triathlete Tommy built a custom tiny home in Santa Cruz, Calif., this offseason and were featured on the FYI reality show Tiny House Nation on March 25.

Golden, Colorado’s Feedback Sports was featured as the ultra-compact Omnium trainer and folding work stand fit well in small spaces…

When recently-married pro triathletes Katie and Tommy Zaferes daydreamed about their first home together, they didn’t envision a sprawling estate or even a tidy colonial. There were no plans for a tricked-out home gym, an indoor lap pool or soaring walls where they could display their impressive collection of awards from racing around the world. In fact, the couple wanted just the opposite. They wanted a tiny home.

Enter Tiny House Nation, the popular FYI reality show that hooks people up with their very own, custom-designed mini-home. On March 25, the Zaferes’ and their brand-new Santa, Cruz, Calif., house — all 370 square feet of it — were featured on an episode. Here, we caught up with the couple about their stint on reality TV and details about their dainty dwelling.

Read the full article

Watch the full episode: http://www.fyi.tv/shows/tiny-house-nation/season-4/episode-12

Feedback Sports App for Bike Maintenance

Inspiration for new products/services can often come from frustration. How many of us have sticky notes and random receipts stuffed in drawers to help us keep track of when we last did what to which bike? It was exactly this sort of thing that prompted Feedback Sports to develop their bicycle maintenance app. #nomorestickynotes #yourbikedeservesbetter #releaseyourinnergeek 

By John Marsh, Editor & Publisher, RoadBikeRider

A couple of weeks ago, I bought a new work stand from Feedback Sports. While I was looking around the site, I noticed that Feedback offers a free maintenance tracking app.

Upon a closer look at the app, I quickly realized it is exactly what I’ve been looking for to keep track of my bike’s components and maintenance schedule. (In fact, I wrote a sticky note to myself about two years ago with an idea for this very same app. I’m glad they read my mind and built it!)

It comes in both iOS (Apple) and Android versions. You can find them on the App Store and at Google Play. Here are links for info:

iOS

Android

Here’s How the App Works

For each of your bikes (you can also take a photo of each bike for reference), you can easily input all of your various components (and fit specs like saddle height and reach) across categories including:

- Frame, Fork, Headset
- Handlebar, Saddle, Seatpost
- Accessories (computers and such)
- Drivetrain
- Brakes
- Wheels, Tires

For the components, you can add detail including the date added to your bike, the weight, cost, description, etc. What you’re left with is a front-to-back, top-to-bottom snapshot of every single jot and tittle about your bike, including the serial number, which could come in handy in case of theft, for warranty purposes, etc.

Then you can set a maintenance schedule and keep records of your maintenance using the app.

Zen-Like Experience Recording It All

I sat down in front of a fire on a recent weekend day when it was too nasty out to ride and worked through the details, hunting down any stray receipts I had, jogging my memory of when I put on those shifters, when I rebuilt my custom wheels, and so on.

I found it a very pleasant way to spend a couple of hours. And while I know I was likely not exact in the dates for everything, I now have a consolidated, easily referenced and pretty accurate record of every single aspect of my main bike. (One bike at a time!)

So now I can quickly see exactly when I installed my last chain, rings, cassette, tires, shift and brake cables, etc. (You can even catalog your tubes, but I drew the line there). And I can set up a maintenance schedule for any component. For instance, I’ve set up a reminder to check my chain near a date at which I think it might be worn enough to change.

I suspect I’ll be checking on various components more by feel than by set reminders, but the main thing is that I’ll be able to know exactly when they were installed. To me, that’s half the battle and will totally remove any future guesswork.

I’m glad I stumbled upon this app. I know it’s going to be super-useful over time.

Conclusion: 
Annnnnnd it’s free. Has anyone mentioned this? Get your bikes dialed. Your bike shop will thank you when you actually have an answer for “When was the last time you____?” instead of standing there, mouth agape with a blank look on your face. 

Feedback’s tiny trainer a favorite among pro triathletes

Helle Fredericksen uses the trainer in a hotel room at the Island House Invitational.

From Triathlete Magazine

Feedback Sports’ Omnium portable resistance trainer makes traveling easier.

Golden, Colo.-based Feedback Sports built its reputation on making the very best in bicycle repair equipment. Work stands, tool kits and bike racks are its bread and butter. But when company founder Doug Hudson met a machine shop owner with an engineering background who showed him a two-drum, fork mount, foldable trainer, Hudson couldn’t resist getting into stationary trainers. He loved the smooth rolling drums and the progressive resistance magnets hidden inside the cylinders. He kept and patented those features on the Omnium, this little marvel of flight-friendly gear.

The front half was re-engineered to make it fold to stow like Feedback work stands. It’s just over two feet long folded up and weighs under 14 pounds. Feedback says in its tote bag, the Omnium is an easy carry-on. In fact, Feedback staffers have field-tested this claim by flying with the Omnium, successfully clearing TSA checks and slipping it into overhead compartments. It’s an ideal piece of equipment for triathletes traveling with their bikes; Gold medalist Gwen Jorgensen set one up on her balcony in Rio, and Helle Frederiksen stayed loose on an Omnium in her hotel room while prepping to race the Island House Tri in the Bahamas.

Read more