Tri Coach Tuesday: A Case for Zone 1

By Laura Marcoux, D3 Multipsport Coach

Zone 1 is commonly known as the recovery zone. We don’t think of it as a “training zone” like the rest of them. Usually zone 1 is described as “extremely easy”, “embarrassingly easy”, “gentle”, and “slow”. It’s basically one step above sitting on the couch. None of these words make us feel like we’re getting any work done so we tend to avoid zone 1 because it’s typical descriptors devalue its training worth.

In a study from the International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance*, that compared training intensity distribution during the course of an Ironman season, statistically significant performance increases were shown when training time was spent primarily in zone 1, compared to zone 2 and higher. For the purpose of this study, zone 1 corresponds to heart rates below aerobic threshold, and zone 2 corresponds to heart rates at and above aerobic threshold (but below anaerobic threshold), which is the intensity in which an Ironman is primarily performed. The participants that spent the majority of their training time above their aerobic threshold (zone 2), had comparatively slower competition times than those who trained mostly below their aerobic threshold.

Read Laura’s complete article HERE

 

Team Manager: D3 Multisport

This is a new position for D3 Multisport and as our triathlon coaching company grows, the purpose of this position is to create camaraderie, excitement and connection among all Team D3 athletes and coaches. This position will manage the Team experience for new and current Team D3 athletes (including training plans, custom plans and 1-to-1 coached athletes) by creating and implementing opportunities, programs and communication pieces that demonstrate value, recognition, support and other important aspects to enhance their coaching experience.  

 

This is a part-time, hourly position.  Approximately 5-10 hours per week depending on the projects and season.  The person in this position will need to have some office hours in Boulder, CO.  The schedule can be pre-set on a weekly basis (outside of special events), or can be flexible.  This position will report to the Director of Getting Things Done and the responsibilities are as follows:

 

Communication

*Create and implement a communication strategy with the Director of Getting Things Done utilizing the Team D3 Facebook Group, email and other strategies.

*Manage the Athlete Page of the D3 website

*Coordinate communication to the Team about events, special offers, sponsors, etc.

*Get creative with tools available including InfusionSoft, Canva, Facebook, FB Live, etc.

 

Events

*Coordinate Team meet-ups at races and align the coaches as necessary

*Coordinate Team events (volunteer opportunities, tri community event participation, etc.)

*Identify and implement opportunities in the tri community where a D3 presence is appropriate.

*Coordinate at least the following race day, and pre or post events:  IM Boulder, Boulder Peak, Boulder 70.3, Annual Season-End Party

 

Gear

*Manage the tri and cycling orders for the Team

*Manage orders for accessories including hats, shirts, etc.

*Manage gear inventory

*Manage monthly new athlete roster to determine gear needs, thank you cards, etc.

*Update the Athlete Portal section of the Team D3 website where gear is featured

 

Misc.

*Brainstorm and implement other areas to engage the Team!

*Other duties as assigned.

 

Desired Qualifications

*Community or team building experience

*Strong customer service background

*Exceptional event planning skills

*Amazing attention to detail

*Packaging and postal experience

*Loves to make people feel part of something special

*Enjoys being a virtual and in-person presence

*Is a networker

*Has experience setting and executing a communication calendar

*Oh ya gotta be creative (both in a digital sense and when it comes to working with little-to-no budget on projects)

*Ability to assimilate with a brand very quickly

*Comfortable working in a home-office (ours and yours!)

*Can come up with new ideas and implement them

*Flexibility is key as we define the responsibilities of this position

*No questions about it – you need to be able to multi-task

*Experience with a CRM tool (InfusionSoft preferred)

*Strong experience with social channels (YouTube, Insta, Twitter, FB, etc.)

*Good experience with Google systems (docs, calendar, etc.)

*Absolutely must be committed to our Team.  It’s not just a job, you’ve got to demonstrate passion for triathlon and the community of the sport as this is a lifestyle and will require odd work hours including weekends

 

For questions and to apply for this position, please email the Director of Getting Things Done, Melanie Ricci, at Melanie@D3Multisport.com.  Include your resume and a cover letter that explains at least 3 reasons why you are a good fit for this position and pick one of your own personal endurance events and explain what it meant to you.

Tri Coach Tuesday: IRONMAN Boulder – 16 Tips for Race Day Success

by Dave Sheanin, D3 Multisport Coach

 

Boulder is the perfect place for an Ironman, of course!  It’s home to some of the fastest professional and age group triathletes in the world, and the 18x collegiate national champion CU Triathlon Team.  Who wouldn’t want to race here? Nobody. Of course, you want to race here. Following is a course preview that includes specific tips I have gleaned from my experience on the course both racing and training.

 

PRE RACE

  • Remember that Boulder is at 5,430 feet above sea level–even higher than Denver, the Mile High City.  The air is thin up here and if you’re coming in from out of town, be sure to stay up on your hydration and don’t forget the sunscreen.

  • A big change for 2018 is going from two separate transition areas–to a single transition area at the Rez.  You’ll still take a bus from the high school to get to the Rez on race morning. This is the only way to get to the race start.  Ironman has a ton of buses and there usually isn’t much of a wait, but my strong recommendation is to arrive at the high school first thing.  Better to have a little extra downtime out at the Rez than be standing at the high school waiting for a bus.

SWIM

  • This is one of the best IM swims on the circuit!  Not because the water is crystal clear (it’s not) and not because it’s an ultra-beautiful venue (we locals think it’s just fine).  No, what makes this an awesome swim is that you swim north, then west, then south–in a single loop. What’s the big deal? Let me remind you that the sun rises in the east.  You’re never swimming into the rising sun.

  • IM uses a rolling start in Boulder so you’ll self-seed by time per the normal procedure.  In the past, this race has been held in August and the Rez typically heats up to or above the wetsuit threshold temp, but in June, I would expect the Rez to be in the mid-60s and wetsuit legal.

  • The course is very well marked and only has two turns (both lefts).  You’ll exit on a boat ramp then make a right to pick up your T1 bag and a U-turn to head into the change tents.

  • Do not skip the sunscreen volunteers as you exit the change tent and head to your bike.  It only takes a couple of seconds to get fully slathered–you’ll want that protection in the Colorado sun.

Complete article here

Tri Coach Tuesday: Get Out the Door, You’ll be Happy You Did

It’s early in the season, but sometimes that motivation just wains.  Coach Alison helps ‘Fire Up Your Motivation’

 

The D3 Triathlon Minute, Episode 107, Fire Up your Motivation from D3 Multisport on Vimeo.

 

Team Colorado: Join Us for this Special Ride

The next Team Colorado event/ride will be May 20th at Tom Watson park.

This is a special event as we pay tribute to a well known, and well loved Colorado triathlete, Joe Vrablik who recently passed away. He was coached by D3 and good friends with Michael Stone, owner of Colorado Multisport. Both organizations will be present at this meeting and would like to share a few moments and stories with you at the ride briefing. Joe had just qualified for Kona through the legacy program. His story is well documented and subject of a couple of IRONMAN special videos. Tim Brosious, race director of IRONMAN Boulder will be on hand as well. This is what Team Colorado is really all about, the community and supporting each other, please come join this last meet up before IRONMAN Boulder.

 

We will ride, and D3 will have coaches on hand to help us break into groups and try to sort of ride together and finish about the same time so we can enjoy a picnic/tailgate. We are working food details and park accommodations so stay tuned–it very well could be a byoe–bring your own everything- but we shall see.

Afterwards will be a great time to chat with coaches and get some last minute training ideas if you are doing IMB and to ask Tim about anything to do with the race and meet your “neighbors” and people sharing the course with you!

The ride:

Arrive at 8, briefing at 8:15, wheels down at 8:30

Return approx 12:30 with routes following the IM Boulder course with at least one loop, possibly two or a modified second loop. Depending on the group and how we split up we will accommodate all levels.

 

Check out this video if you want to learn more about Joe

Calendar event here

303Beginner Tri Project – Training 101: Bare Essentials

by Alison Freeman

 

I firmly believe that ANYONE can do a sprint triathlon. And you don’t necessarily need a coach, a training plan, or 10 hours a week to prepare for it, either. But you’ll have a more enjoyable experience if you do some training prior to race day. Here are some general training guidelines that will set you up for success at a sprint triathlon:

 

– Whatever your starting point – the couch, the peak of fitness, or somewhere in between – start your training exactly there and build up your workout frequency and duration gradually. Jumping into a six-day-a-week training plan if your most recent marathon was Netflix-related is not the road to success as much as the road to getting injured.

 

– Endurance is built on consistent training, week after week, so build up to a training frequency that includes two swims, two bikes, and two runs each week.

 

– Increase your longest swim, bike, and run distances with the goal that your longest swim, bike, and run are at least 20% greater than the race distance. For a standard sprint triathlon, that means swimming 950 meters, biking 14.5 miles, and running (or walking or jogging) 3.75 miles.

 

 

– Make sure to include recovery in your plan! You need to give your body time to “absorb” the fitness that you’re building. Even when you’re firing on all cylinders, make sure to have one workout-free day each week. (And that does not mean go ahead and climb a 14er. That means sit on the couch.) Additionally, every 3-4 weeks should be a recovery week that has 20-30% less overall workout volume than the weeks prior.

 

– Give yourself several opportunities to run immediately after biking, even if it’s only for five or ten minutes. Your legs will not cooperate the first time you try this – which is why that should not be on race day. The more often you do it, the easier it will feel. (By the way, this type of workout is typically called a “brick,” which comes from BRC: bike and run in combination.)

 

– If you can find a good location for it, do a race simulation day – swim then bike then run – three weeks before the race. A metric version of your race distances (about 60% of the actual distances) is a good approach. This race day simulation will provide some good experience, like how it feels to bike when dripping wet, and will also give a great confidence boost before race day!

 

– Your biggest training week should be three weeks prior to the race (the week that concludes two weeks prior to race day). After that, you DO want to continue training so that you don’t lose all the fitness that you worked so hard to achieve! Two weeks prior to the race decrease your overall training volume by 40%. The week prior to the race, do a short swim (or two), bike, and run, and stay off your feet as much as possible.

– Be sure to incorporate training on terrain that is comparable to your race location. If your race swim is in a lake or reservoir, be sure to find some opportunities for open water swimming. If your bike and/or run courses are on trails or have some big hills, hit those up in training as well.

 

 

If reading all of that gave you a headache, and you now feel more confused about triathlon training than you were this morning – just swim, bike, and run. You’ll be fine!

 

Triathlon Mental Training: 3 LESSONS I LEARNED WATCHING THE 2018 WINTER OLYMPICS

By Jim Hallberg of D3 Multisport

I really love watching the Olympics, I look past the politics and look at the essence of the sport and the sportsmanship. I look at what has allowed these amazing athletes to become so successful and what we can take from it.
Here are my three big takeaways from the Olympics.

LESSON 1 – STAY CALM NO MATTER WHAT
In the Men’s cross country skiathlon, Norway’s Simen Hegstad Kruger was a big favorite to win. In the first 250 yards, Kruger fell, got knocked in the head, and broke his pole. He was now in last place. Without any panic he got back up, grabbed a spare pole, composed himself and set out to rejoin the group. Rather than a huge effort to quickly get back, he worked his way up steadily to the group. With 8km to go he was in the group in fifth place. Then, he put in an early push and ended up crushing his competitors, taking the Gold medal with plenty of room behind him.

The takeaway for triathletes is that regardless of any mishaps during your event or even pre race, from your goggles coming off in the swim, a flat tire on the course, or you can’t find your bike in transition (I’m guilty of this one) don’t panic. Adapt to the mishap, adjust your strategy accordingly and most importantly stay positive. If Kruger has said to himself that his race was over after his crash, he never would have put on one of the best performances of the Games. So, if you haven’t had a major mishap, you will eventually. Make sure you keep you head about you and make smart decisions.

LESSON 2 – TRAIN WITH A TEAM
The downhill skiers from Norway, the ones who called themselves the Attacking Vikings, they seemed to know what they were doing. As it turns out, they train as a team, race as a team, and have a lot of fun along the way. This camraderie is not only good for having a good time, but it also creates accountability. Not only can they not skip workouts, they are pushed by their teammates.

So, in your training, the next opportunity you have to train with others, you should do it and do it often. It holds you accountable to attend and to work hard. If Masters Swim club is too early in the morning, make the adjustment to get to the pool for that practice. If there are group rides or runs in your area, especially ones with a group of other triathletes, make an effort to get to those rides. You may find that you push yourself harder in a group setting than you can on your own. You may also find yourself having more fun too. If you want to stay in this sport, it has to be fun.

LESSON 3 – DON’T FORGET TO HAVE FUN
Did you notice that the most successful athletes there also seemed to either deal with the pressure or simply didn’t have pressure? As one skier pointed out, if your not having fun, whats the point? Yes it’s hard work, but in some sense it is also playtime. Sure beats painting your living room, or doing your taxes.

So, from the smallest race to the World Championships, it’s not luck that got you there, and it won’t be luck getting you across the finish line in a triathlon or a marathon. It will have hard training across many months. In order to have the consistency it takes to be successful, you must have some fun along the way. Maybe it’s finding a group to train with (see Lesson 2), maybe it’s making your workouts an adventure (ride to that coffee shop in the next town over), or simply enjoy the wind in your face on your bike. Your goals will drive you, but enjoyment will keep you coming back.

Jim Hallberg is certified by both USA Triathlon, USA Cycling and TrainingPeaks. He works with athletes of all ages and abilities and believes in a balanced training program to solidify your strengths and bring up your weaknesses. Jim is also a highly competitive triathlete, having won USAT Nationals in 2007, 2010, and 2016.

Tri Club Tuesday: D3 Athlete competes at IRONMAN World Championships after serious waterskiing injury

From Livewell Nebraska
By Kelsey Stewart

 

When Steve Nabity first took up triathlon training, he didn’t know how to swim, and he didn’t own a road bike.

The 61-year-old has since put six Ironman competitions under his belt. He made it to the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii last year, but a stomach bug hindered his performance. In October, Nabity returned to Hawaii to compete against more than 2,000 athletes in the sport’s iconic event.

Swimming and cycling were the Omaha man’s best options after he sustained a serious waterskiing injury.

Four years ago, Nabity and a group of friends were waterskiing in Tennessee. The then 57-year-old hadn’t been on the water in a few years, but he felt confident. When the boat started moving, Nabity attempted to stand up on his skis.

Instead of gracefully slaloming across the water, Nabity ended up doing the splits. Above the sound of the boat and water, he heard a ripping sound, like a piece of paper being torn.

His friends pulled Nabity from the water. By the time they got back to the dock, Nabity had fainted from the pain. Since they were in rural Tennessee, it took over an hour for an ambulance to arrive. When it did, paramedics decided to have Nabity life-flighted to the nearest hospital.

Doctors didn’t realize the scope of the injury until Nabity returned to Omaha. He had torn all three hamstring tendons off the bone of his right leg.

After surgery, Nabity spent six weeks in a brace. Unable to bend his legs, he spent his time either standing or resting flat on a recliner. He graduated to walking carefully. Leg and hamstring lifts during physical therapy helped rebuild his strength. Doctors encouraged Nabity to pick up low-impact exercises such as swimming and bicycling. “Those are for wimps,” he told them.

But when Nabity, CEO of Accu- Quilt, cheered on his son during an Ironman race in Idaho, it set things in motion.

His goal: make it to the race series’ marquee event in Kona, Hawaii, before he turned 80. The full-distance race consists of a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run.

“You never know what’s going to happen on your path or your journey,” Nabity said. “This probably is not the way I would have started out with Ironman. You’re doing life and a curve ball happens. All you can do is control your effort.”

Read the full story