Butterfield Wins Bermuda Marathon in 2:27

Always one to recognize and compliment the competition, as well as thanking the cheering crowds, Longmont’s Tyler Butterfield won yesterday’s Bermuda Marathon with grace, and gratitude.

From the Royal Gazette

Tyler Butterfield followed in the example set by Dage Minors in Friday’s Elite Mile when he ran to victory in the Bermuda Marathon yesterday in near-perfect running conditions.

Butterfield, Bermuda’s top male triathlete who returned from his home in Boulder, Colorado to compete for the first time in several years, set the pace after a 1hr 14min time for the first loop on his way to a winning time of 2:27:07 ahead of last year’s winner, Bryan Morseman, of the United States, who clocked 2:28:43. Third was Abu Kebede Diriba, of Ethiopia, in 2:37:44.

“I’ve done one marathon before and that was a 2:42 [time] when I was 21, a good 14 years ago,” Butterfield said after his victory. “I ran a 2:48 in an Ironman, so I knew with a 2:42 I should be able to improve on that.”

Butterfield ran several miles with another local runner, Chayce Smith, who was competing in the Bermuda Half-Marathon.

“Chayce and I ran the first lap together and it was great hearing everyone cheering us on,” Butterfield said. “It was nice to have some locals up the front.

“Bryan led me through the first half and then we ran the first mile or two [second loop] together before I pulled away just after Trimingham Hill.

“There was a slight downhill before the flat to McGall’s Hill and I had speed coming off the hill and just went with it. I thought I might regret it later because it was a little quick. The first lap was a negative split but I have to say there was a lot of people out there cheering. Thank you to the people who come out every year.”

Butterfield and Morseman were tucked in with the Half-Marathon lead pack, before the field started to open up after the two-mile mark and Butterfield carried on to win,

Butterfield still holds the senior schools mile record of 4:27:30, which he set in 1999 when a student at Saltus.

 

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Women’s Wednesday: Colorado’s Sarah Thomas – the woman who swam a century and made history

Sarah Thomas © Ken Classen

 “…only three athletes active today have finished ‘current-neutral’ swims of 63 miles or more — all three of them women.”

Unnoticed and unfeted, a US swimmer is breaking the sport’s boundaries

From Financial Times

Last week Sarah Thomas got up at 5am and drove the 25 miles from her home to the swimming pool in Lakewood, Colorado, as she does most mornings. There she completed her 6,000-yard workout before heading to work as a healthcare recruiter. She was untroubled by autograph hunters; no TV crews stopped her to seek an interview.

And yet Thomas is, according to Steven Munatones, founder of the World Open Water Swimming Association, “an outlier, a once-in-a-generation athlete, and a motivator who is showing others how far they can push themselves”. In August she completed what must rank as one of 2017’s greatest achievements in endurance sport, swimming further than anyone — man or woman — has swum before without the assistance of currents: a scarcely believable 104 miles, nonstop, in three days and nights in the water.

“The record wasn’t really the big incentive for me,” Thomas tells me from her home in Denver. “It was about finding and pushing my personal limits.” What could be a weary trope coming from many athletes rings true from Thomas. She swims without sponsorship — fitting her training around her full-time job. Her achievements have received little media attention; her record-breaking swim has not, to date, even been mentioned in a national newspaper.

“Sarah herself doesn’t seek out publicity,” Ken Classen, her coach and training partner, tells me. “If it wasn’t for her friends and mother-in-law she’d probably have no publicity and quite frankly I don’t think she’d care either way.”

Last year Thomas swam a record 82 miles nonstop in Lake Powell but felt she could go further — the 100-mile barrier beckoned. In choosing the current-free Lake Champlain for her swim, Thomas was attempting something no one of either gender had previously done. “A few people have swum over 100 miles before,” explains Evan Morrison, co-founder of the Marathon Swimming Federation, that adjudicated Thomas’ swim, but only with the assistance of strong, predictable currents.

These include a 139.8-mile effort by the late Croatian swimmer, Veljko Rogosic, in the Adriatic. “His swim was very impressive, but it belongs in a separate category,” explains Morrison. According to his records, only three athletes active today have finished “current-neutral” swims of 63 miles or more — all three of them women.

Beat Knechtle, a Swiss doctor and endurance athlete who has studied female performance in open-water swimming, offers two possible explanations for this dominance. “Women have an advantage due to their higher body fat, which provides insulation against the cold and better buoyancy.” As wetsuits may not be worn for official open-water swims, this could be an important advantage. Then there is the mental side. “In open-water swimming women have learnt that they are able to beat men and therefore expect to compete at a higher level,” says Knechtle.

Thomas agrees. “Women have a long history of swimming: it’s been socially acceptable for us to be athletes in the pool and open water for much longer than in other sports. I think having that strong foundation has really helped women to compete and train at a high level.”

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Colorado man, 75, dies following triathlon at Sudgen Regional Park, officials say

Sugden Regional Park in East Naples offers a host of activities, many centered around the 60-acre lake.

From Naples News

A Colorado man died following a triathlon at Sugden Regional Park in East Naples on Sunday, officials said.

A Collier County Sheriff’s Office deputy stationed at the event to coordinate traffic was alerted by a man about 7:20 a.m. that “there is a man in the water, not breathing,” according to a Sheriff’s Office incident report.

The deputy ran to the shoreline of the lake where he found a man, later identified as 75-year-old James Treadwell, lying on the sand and being tended to by a Collier County EMS paramedic, two race participants and Treadwell’s wife, the report states.

After confirming Treadwell had no pulse and wasn’t breathing, the group began cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Read the full story

303Radio Interviews Stryd’s Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson

303radio was in Boulder recently interviewing Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson of Stryd–the running power meter and finding out why it should be under the Christmas tree this year.

If you aren’t familiar with running with a power meter you will want to listen to this podcast to learn why running with power can help you be faster and more efficient.

 

Also, be sure to check out our full story on Stryd by Rich Soares from our Holiday Gift Guide.

Harvest Moon Long Course

Boulder

 

The Harvest Moon Triathlon the 19th edition of this event takes place at the beautiful Boulder Reservoir. on September 16th, 2018.  Est. in 2000 this Colorado classic  provides the veterans to beginners a challenging, affordable, and competitive race with a local flavor.  Whether this is your final event of the season, or a tune-up for a fall long course triathlon, don’t miss the Harvest Moon!  The Aquabike portion is one of the fastest growing Aquabikes in the nation, while the duathlon is Colorado’s only long-course duathlon.

 

Colorado Tri Series includes:

Colorado Triahlon

Boulder Peak Triathlon

Harvest Moon Long Course

Series details here

 

 

Event details and Registration here

ColoradoTriathlon

Boulder

 

Where Colorado comes to race on June 2nd, 2018! The Colorado Triathlon – sprint & olympic distances, (NEW Duathlon & Aquabike options) presented by Lorissa’s Kitchen.  To make this the “can’t miss” event of the season, we’ll also have: amazing food and beverages provided by Noodles & Co., Ska Brewing Beer Garden, athlete full zip sweat shirts, and the best swag bag of the season. 

For us this race is about one person, the Colorado local who knows Colorado has the best triathlon scene in the nation.  It’s a local scene we’re darn proud of!  

 

Colorado Tri Series includes:

Colorado Triathlon

Boulder Peak Triathlon

Harvest Moon Long Course

Series details here

 

Event details and Registration here

303 THANKSgiving

By Bill Plock

I’m stumped. How can 303cycling, 303triathlon and 303radio even begin to thank everyone that supports us? Where do we start, who do we include? Everyone of course. Everyone who rides bikes, does triathlons, starts a race, pops a wheelie, runs on a trail, and just has fun doing what so many of us love.

Originally I thought I would like to thank those organizations and people who support us and make 303 even a possibility. But that just seemed too limiting and sort of missing the point. The point being we exists to celebrate pretty much anything that has to do with moving any direction on a bike, in a wetsuit or with running shoes on. But more than that, doing it with a smile, in places that make us smile, in events that challenge us and sometimes it’s just hanging out with our friends and community that makes it all worthwhile.

It’s about the smiles, the relationships and the community. So as Thanksgiving is upon us the entire 303network thanks you, our readers, for simply being part of the journey to share Colorado’s athletes, participants, organizations, races, events, and companies that make it all possible and put smiles on our faces. Please check out this album on Facebook of a few smiles collected over the year!

The 303 Team is forever in gratitude. Happy Thanksgiving.

2017 IRONMAN World Championships Kona – Bill Plock’s Tri Hearter Recap

BEN HOFFMAN

By Bill Plock

I’m struggling to know what to share with you. There is so much. So much. Joy. Triumph. Sadness. Perseverance. Grit. Guts. Tenacity. The list is super long!

The results of the Ironman World Championships are not measured by a clock, or a place on a podium or by a Garmin. They are measured by smiles, tears and hugs. By racing and watching this race, we make huge deposits in the experience bank of our souls that serve us later in life.

Colorado’s Vicki Derrick and Jamie Twedt

It’s hard to share an epic event like this without using a cliche. I need to remember that to “narrow your focus broadens your appeal” and as one of the eyes and ears of 303triathlon, my “job” is to share with you and try to find relativity in this ocean of stories. Imagine you are on the pier and 2,400 boats appear on the horizon intending to land. Each one from a different place, maybe a different continent, maybe even from a country you didn’t know existed. Each boat carries stories and dreams and some are captained alone but most come with a crew. But they all have one goal. To finish.

Being in Kona for race week is like being on a captive island of history and tradition drawing these boats in like a compass faces north. The triathlon world focuses here for the week. Even if the Ironman distance is not your race of choice, the challenge of the sport clearly radiates here. Experts and those in the industry greet all of these boats, and in our case meeting legends like Bob Babbitt and Mike Reilly to share the history and meaning of this race just make the landing that much richer.

D3 Multisport’s Simon Butterworth, on his way to winning his age group

I encourage you to listen to those interviews to gain a true perspective on what happens here and what HAS happened here. What I have learned, and continue to learn each time I am here, is that to know the history, and to respect the race is essential to understand its epic nature.

With the focus on Colorado and our saturation of this race with 54 athletes toeing the line we have a lot share—and a lot to be thankful for. It feels like family. With all those boats landing and people scurrying everywhere, to latch on to a familiar smile, to know just a few stories is like finding a life preserver in rough unknown waters.

303 Ambassador Todd Plymale-Mallory encourages Andy Potts

We at 303 see ourselves as a bridge to you. A place where you can see what happens when your friends and loved ones landed here with 2,346 other athletes. Yes some came here to win it all, and our local pro, Andy Potts, was the first American across the line. We in Colorado have a lot to be proud of.

The other 53 athletes persevered. We tried to share moments of each of their journeys and for any we may have missed, it wasn’t for lack of trying. And you made Colorado proud and it was such an honor to share your journey with our readers and subscribers a few thousand miles away. Even with technology of instant connectivity, it’s the intangible flow of like-minded energy and a love of this sport and a love of every journey we encountered, that hopefully rushed at the speed of light into your hearts. We hope you felt what we did, and sharing that and feeling such a wonderful community in Colorado at the “Super Bowl” of triathlon is what makes being at this race epic.

Be proud 303 Nation. We have the most amazing triathlon community in the world.

303Radio talks with TrainingPeaks Dirk Friel on Colorado Representation at Swim Start

TrainingPeaks co-founder and Chief Evangelist Dirk Friel talks about the Ironman World Championship swim start and Colorado representation.

303Radio: Colorado’s Smokin’ Fast Tim Hola

303Radio caught up with smoking fast Tim Hola at the King Kamehameha Kona Beach hotel. Humble as always, but with 15 years of experience racing here, we know he is going to crush it on Saturday at the Ironman World Championship. Good luck Tim! Make Colorado proud!!