Longmont’s Oktoberfest Triathlon renaming trophy after CU Boulder triathlete

From the Daily Camera

The University of Colorado triathletes who raced with Alessandro Zarzur will never forget his name. Now, neither will future generations of triathletes.

The trophy given out to the winner of the Oktoberfest Triathlon on Sunday will be renamed after Zarzur, a 19-year-old CU triathlete who was killed earlier this year in a bicycle crash in Sunshine Canyon.

The Oktoberfest Triathlon in Longmont is the last outdoor race of the year for the Rocky Mountain Collegiate Conference, which includes CU and other colleges from Colorado and Wyoming. The winning team used to be awarded the Collegiate Cup, but it will now be named the Zarzur Collegiate Cup.

Race Director Lance Panigutti is a former CU triathlete himself, so he heard the tragic news in May when Zarzur died while cycling up on Flagstaff Mountain.

“The team has always been near and dear to my heart,” he said. “So when it happened, I had a lot of people reach out and ask what we could do. I didn’t want something rushed; I wanted something that the team could really rally behind.”

So Panigutti told the team and Zarzur’s family about his plan to rename the race trophy after them, and they were immediately on board.

“Because it’s the last outdoor race of the season, we look at (the Oktoberfest Triathlon) as a nice big party,” he said. “We felt this would be a nice way to celebrate him, to have something every year to honor him.”

When she heard about the plan to rename the trophy after her son, Zarzur’s mother, Hanan, in Sao Paulo, booked a flight to be there for the race and will be there to present the trophy to the winning team…

Read the full story

 

BBSC Triathlon’s Boulder Sunset Triathlon Recap – An Endurance Festival!

The Boulder Sunset Triathlon BBSC Triathlon really could be labeled an endurance festival. With 1,500 athletes competing in an Olympic and Sprint Distance triathlon, a duathlon and a 5k and 10k run, there was something for everyone. Families with parents racing with their kids were everywhere. Many challenged athletes participated as well. Universities from CO, WY, UT, NM, AZ competed and added to the vibe. If you have raced in Boulder before, the course was familiar and the weather couldn’t have been better. With such a variety of competitors and many first timers on the course, with seasoned veterans, it made the atmosphere fun and unique. This was the 10th anniversary of this race and no doubt will continue to grow and with it’s multi race format, late in the summer will undoubtedly attract endurance athlete of all sorts for years to come.

OFFICIAL 2017 RESULTS

Check out 303’s Facebook photo album

We also interviewed several participants – check out 303Radio’s interviews!

First time triathlete Darren Fogg what was it like?

CU Triathlon teammates Cassidy Hemp and Scarlet Kaplan

Michelle Lund BBSC Post Race

Michelle Malik and Kirsten Smith pre race Athletes in Tandem

School of Mines Madison Scott, Alex Michael and Megan Cone

IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder Pro Race Wrap Up!

Below you will find everything involving the professional male and female athletes from Saturday’s race, from the pro panel talk the day before the race, Tim Don’s emotional finish chute moments with his family, all the way through 303Radio’s finish line interviews… Check it out!

Pro panel here at IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder! #boulder703 David Downey Ben Hoffman Tim Don Alicia Kaye Jeanni Seymour Jocelyn Gardner McCauley Rodolphe Rudy von Berg

 

 

 

 

 

Incredible joyous emotion from Tim Don with his family in the finish chute (video by Mark Cathcart):

The Pro Women finish line video:


 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pro women’s podium, complete with champagne!

Finish Line interviews with the Pros, by 303Radio’s Rich Soares:

Becky Piper – Paralyzed on right side, completes Ironman 70.3 Boulder

“Don’t be afraid to fail. Be afraid to not try.”
That’s Becky Piper‘s motto.

Yesterday, Becky was able to check another monstrous goal off her list – the Boulder Ironman 70.3.

A tremendous achievement for any able-bodied soul, Becky had to work harder than most, both physically and mentally, because she is paralyzed on her right side.
Just four years ago she was an accomplished runner and XTERRA athlete, living in Guam with her husband Sam, stationed in the military there. During a home invasion, she was beaten, and according to doctors, was with an hour of dying. But she didn’t die. She survived, and learned to talk and eat and walk again.
She GOT BACK UP.
In June, 303 reported on Becky’s “comeback” off-road triathlon at XTERRA Lory:
Becky Piper: Xterra Nats qualifier, savagely attacked, comatose & paralyzed, and back to Xterra again – at local Lory race

We followed her closely yesterday as she tackled the next goal on her list, IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder.
303’s Para-Tri ambassador Sasha Underwood is a close friend of Becky’s, and frequent training partner and guide. She was at every turn of Saturday’s race, and was overwhelmed with pride and emotion as Becky hit each milestone.

Becky is everything I strive to be; sheer grit, tenacious, positive, gracious, kind, courageous, strong, an amazing sense of humor, and she’ll probably kill me for saying this but she is inspiring – but not because she has a disability .. it’s because she finds a way to do anything and everything whether it’s racing, or becoming a USAT coach, she doesn’t accept “no” or “can’t” and nothing can stop her.

Sasha captured these pivotal moments of Becky being carried out of the water by her husband, and the crowning moment of crossing the finish line, just behind the similarly-inspiring story of Team Agar.
Swim exit video:

Finish video

Read today’s Times-Call article for more on Becky Piper, including the special Allard Brace she uses, her husband’s tough love, and this observation:


Becky Piper said she hopes news of her first Ironman 70.3 reaches someone who is living with a mobility issue.

“I just want to get the word out that if you have foot drop, then your life and your quality of life isn’t over,” she said. “There’s tools out there and there is technology out there to improve your quality of life. And not to give up. Don’t give up.”

 

 

Father-Son Agar Team tackles Ironman 70.3 Boulder

Jeff & Johnny Agar with Ironman Regional Director Dave Christen

By Kim Welk

Jeff and Johnny Agar of Rockford, Michigan will be among the faces in the Ironman Boulder 70.3 event on Saturday.  Jeff and Johnny are a father-son team.  Johnny is 23 and was born with cerebral palsy.  Johnny is an athlete. On his website, Johnny defines athlete as – “a person who is proficient in sports and other physical exercise.”  He goes on to state that “Now that I have crossed the finish line, I feel like I am officially an athlete.”  Jeff and Johnny have completed 5Ks to Marathons and sprint to 70.3 triathlons.

I had the opportunity to sit down with Jeff and Johnny as well as his Mom Becki, Sisters Annie and Grace and Coaches Thad Beaty and Nicole Serraiocco to talk about the race.

This is the family’s first visit to Colorado.  After driving 17 hours from Michigan they were happy to settle into their home away from home for the week.  Johnny enjoyed the opportunity to visit a park with his Aunt and Uncle and fish in the stream where he caught several brown trout.  He also hopes to get to the Olympic Training Center while he is here.  The family also plans to go to a Colorado Rockies baseball game.  They all expressed how much they like Colorado and how excited they are to be here.

Jeff and Johnny have been getting their training in since arriving.  Yesterday was a preview of the swim at the reservoir and a brief look at the bike course.  They have also driven the bike course and looked at targets using Best Bike Split software to determine their strategy for race day.  The goal for both Jeff and Johnny is to manage the matches that they will use on the course and ensure that there are enough matches left for Johnny to walk the last ½ mile of the run course and cross the finish under his own power.  For Jeff – this means controlling power output on the bike, hydrating properly to limit the impacts of the altitude and applying his training with confidence.  For Johnny – he too needs to ensure that he is properly hydrated, he has to shift around in the chariot to keep his feet awake so they are ready to walk and he says his most important job is to remind his Dad about his cadence!  He looks forward to the ice cream post race!

As most triathletes know, mindset is equally as important as the skills needed to swim, bike and run.  Johnny’s mindset is an inspiration.  He believes that failure is part of the process.  He has received encouragement from his family, his coaches and his friends every step of the way.  His sister Annie said “if he failed it was not because of the fact that he had cerebral palsy it was because he did not try hard enough.”  And Johnny agrees – he takes ownership and does not make excuses.  Johnny is not worried about not doing it, he is worried about “not trying.”

Race morning will involve many checklists.  Johnny said that he doesn’t sleep because he is so excited for the event so when it is time to get rolling he is waking the family up.  His Sisters commented that their job is to get themselves to the car so that he stops herding them to go!  Jeff said the set-up takes much longer for them with all of the equipment and referring to the checklists often is a must.  He said there is only one time that you show up at a race without a life jacket!

Jeff and Johnny will have their coaches on sight to support them throughout the day.  They embrace the opportunity to learn and grow from observing this team at work and to gather information to carry forward to the next goal.  The Agars are hoping for an invitation to return to Kona and Johnny will continue to train towards his ultimate goal of completing a 5K on his own and “give his Dad a break!”

Here is a great video taken Wednesday by coach Nicole Serraiocco:

To learn more about Team Agar, visit their webpage – www.TeamAgar.com.

As the writer of this article, receiving the opportunity to cover Team Agar at this race is a gift that is amazing.   There were so many valuable life lessons learned in our brief conversation.  I look forward to a continued friendship with the family and following Johnny and Jeff’s journey and celebrating each milestone along the way.

Look for additional information throughout the weekend on Team Agar’s journey as well as their race recap.  Until then as Johnny says – “one step at a time!

IRONMAN 70.3 Race Week: Helpful Pre-race jitters, or Debilitating anxiety?

From Training Peaks

Avoiding Mental Sabotage Part 4: How to Channel Pre-Race Anxiety

BY PATRICK J. COHN, PH.D. AND ANDRE BEKKER
In part four of our continuing series on mastering your mental skills for race-day, we discuss how to properly channel your pre-race anxiety into positive energy and focus.

How to Cope with Pre-Race Jitters
Every triathlete, runner or cyclist, no matter their level, experiences pre-race jitters—the feeling of excitement or butterflies in your stomach prior to the start of a race. However, some athletes turn pre-race jitters into performance anxiety. Pre-race jitters are a natural part of your racing, but pre-race performance anxiety will cause most athletes to tense up, worry about their performance and ultimately not perform up to their ability.

Are Pre-Race Jitters Helpful to Your Performance?
The first step is to find out if you experience common pre-race jitters or if you are anxious or scared. The difference is that pre-race jitters or butterflies are helpful to your race—they help you focus and perform better.

However, real “performance anxiety” is a reaction to stress or fear about the event that can cause excess tension. We think that pre-race jitters are a form of respect for the event you are about to engage in and part of the physical way your body prepares for the race.

How can you distinguish between pre-race jitters and performance anxiety? Look at the characteristic of each below:

Pre-game Jitters
You feel excited to get the race started.
You feel physically up and alert.
You think clearly about what you want to accomplish.
You feel ready to tackle any challenge that comes your way.
You feel your heart beating harder, but you think it’s natural and helpful.
When the race starts, you relax, get into the flow, and don’t focus on how you are feeling.
You have energy to keep going until the end of the race.
Performance Anxiety
You are over-excited about the race and feel scared before you start.
You feel physically sick to your stomach.
You have excess internal chatter and can’t think clearly or calmly.
You are worried about what you might encounter during the race.
You feel physical symptoms such as an increased heart rate, but worry that you are anxious or uptight.
You feel anxious or tight well into the start of the race and it may last for the entire event.
You feel drained and exhausted before the competition even starts.
If you identify with pre-race jitters, that’s great. That’s what you want to feel just before the event. You want to embrace the pre-race jitters.

If you identify more with performance anxiety above, you’ll have to learn how to overcome your performance anxiety by channeling it in a more constructive way…

Read the full story

It’s Ironman 70.3 Race Week! Race Week Do’s and Don’ts

Photo courtesy of 303Triathlon – Boulder Reservoir, IRONMAN Boulder 2017

From IRONMAN
by Matt Lieto

The week leading up to a major race, what we call “race week” in the sport, can bring its own breed of stress and anxiety. These emotions can pile up and wreak havoc on an athlete’s race experience and even results. So what’s a high-strung athlete to do? The best chance for success on race week is to do your best to make it as much like any other week in training.

IRONMAN champ Linsey Corbin sums up race week success with this: “Get a lot of sleep early in the week, dial in your race gear early, thank a volunteer, stay hydrated, don’t stress about the weather, do something nice, keep the blood flowing, and have fun.” Below you’ll find a few more handy points to help keep the cortisol levels down.

IRONMAN Race Week Do’s & Don’ts….

Click HERE to read about bike tune ups, new gear, pre-race diet, too little – and too much – rest, massages, course recon, and managing your support crew.

Women’s Wednesday: Colorado Outdoor Recreation Office Welcomes New Deputy Director Janette Heung

Office of Gov. John Hickenlooper

Office of Economic Development & International Trade

Denver – July 24, 2017 – The Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade (OEDIT) today announced that Janette Heung will serve as the new deputy director for the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Industry Office (OREC), effective Aug. 10, 2017.

“Janette is joining us at an exciting time with record growth for our outdoor recreation industry, and she’s just the person to help take us to the next level,” said Luis Benitez, OREC director. “We are thrilled to have her experience and knowledge on our team.”

In her new role as the deputy director, Heung will support economic development within the industry, work to build a dynamic workforce, advance conservation and stewardship, and encourage the intersection with public health and wellness in the sector. She will also develop new initiatives to further Colorado’s outdoor recreation growth. The position manages day-to-day operations of the office and serves as a liaison in the community.

“Colorado is rapidly becoming the epicenter of the outdoor recreation industry,” Heung said. “I’m tremendously excited for the opportunities that lie ahead”.

Heung was born in the US, but grew up in the concrete jungles of Hong Kong. Returning to study as an adult, she soon became mesmerized by the wildness of the North American continent. She experienced her first winters in New England during school, and eventually followed the call of winter to Alaska, the Alps, and the Andes. When she discovered Colorado and its outdoor recreation community, she immediately relocated here and started adventuring at an extraordinarily high level.

Many classic alpine mountaineering routes in the US and Canadian Rockies followed, and she has managed to complete first ascents in New Zealand and Bolivia, including on the south face of Mount Aspiring in New Zealand.

“Janette’s love for the outdoors directly feeds into her zeal for protecting it-when she’s not exploring outside, she is working on a range of environmental policy, public health and business challenges,” said Benitez. “She is a real asset to our office and the State of Colorado.”

Before accepting the deputy director role she was a consultant who specialized in strategic planning and program management with a focus on conservation and health. Throughout her career, she has consulted for public, private, and non-profit sector clients, including Fortune 500 companies, the City and County of Denver, and The Nature Conservancy. Previously, she was a senior management consultant at Deloitte Consulting in the greater Washington DC area.

Heung is the also co-founder of Unleashed, a winter climbing community event that features storytelling by community champions with the proceeds supping outdoor education non-profits. Heung holds bachelor degrees in physics and biomedical engineering from Tufts University and a master’s degree in Environmental Health from Harvard University.

Outdoor Recreation is a booming industry in Colorado with $34 billion in consumer spending and $994 million in state and local tax revenue. The industry provides 350k jobs with earnings of more than $4 million. Over 80% of Coloradans participate in trail-related activities on a regular basis according to the 2014 Scope Report.

Governor John Hickenlooper launched the OREC office in 2015. OREC is one of only three offices in the nation that provides a central point of contact, advocacy, resources and support at the state level for the diverse constituents, businesses, communities and groups that rely on the continued health of the outdoor recreation industry.

The OREC office is a division of the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade.

Tri Boulder Race Recap

By Kirsten Smith

Photo by Ashley Wilkinson

The BBSC Tri Boulder race at the Boulder Rez this year was a huge success! Not only was the weather perfect, the water smooth as glass, the temps only moderately hot, and barely any wind, but PRs and a great time was had by almost every athlete I talked to after the race!!

The only complaints I heard were no shade on the run, couldn’t see buoys because we swam straight into the sun, the aid station on the bike was on a downhill so it was hard to gab bottles at high speed, no actual awards for podium finishers, and packet pick up should have been Friday in Denver and then Saturday in Boulder since most people coming into town only came one day in advance.

People loved the finisher’s medal, post-race food, support, volunteers, beginner wave, and low key feel for the race. The thing most people talked about was how fast and fun the bike course was. The roads in Boulder are all pretty fast and smooth. Parking on race morning was easy and there were lots of activities for spectators and families to do during the race.

Photo by Bill Plock

The courses for both the sprint and the Olympic races are very familiar to most local Colorado triathletes so it’s nice to be able to come in and race hard and compare times and progress to other races on the same or very similar courses.

I had several clients who did the race this year and all either PRd or made the podium. All walked away happy with their result.
This was my 2nd year doing this race and I had a lot of fun racing with so many local triathletes. I was only one minute slower than my goal and I blame it on the sun. It was so bright at the start I swam to the wrong buoy near the turnaround so I added 1-2 minutes on my swim. Other than that I had a great race! I love racing at the Boulder Reservoir and can’t wait to do their next race in Boulder on August 26th, register here and I will see you there!!!

BBSC has triathlons, duathlons, and running races in Boulder, CO, St. George, UT, and Las Vegas, NV. Check out their race schedule here

What’s Your “Why?” Tell us & Win Velorama VIP Tickets!

Tell us your “why” and win two amazing VIP credentials to the upcoming Velorama! 

Audi Flatirons shared their Why – now it’s your turn. What makes you get up early, ride in the rain, run in the snow, swim in whitecaps? When the going gets tough, what keeps you coming back for more?

Give us a story, a “why,” include a picture or two, and we will feature the winners stories on 303cycling and/or 303triathlon. The grand prize is a pair of VIP credentials to the upcoming Velorama on Aug 10-13. You will need to let us know what day you would like.

Velorama is a new festival this summer; a celebration of bands, bikes, and beyond! It combines the Colorado Classic, a premier pro cycling race, with a 3-day music festival and neighborhood celebration in the RiNo Art District. In addition to the headlining bands, entrance to the festival includes access to the Denver Flea (the Front Range’s favorite curated showcase of Colorado makers), a bicycle-centric lifestyle and vendor village, a huge variety of local food and drink curated by Drink RiNo, and prime viewing areas for the thrilling final stages of the Colorado Classic.

Two other winners will receive a pair of general admission tickets good for one day! VIP credentials include special VIP Hospitality tents, viewing areas, premium all-day food, beverages, and more.

The deadline for your story is August 5th.

Submit your story, photo(s) and contact info (we won’t share) BY EMAIL

Include a way for us to contact you (we won’t publish). Be creative and have fun!