Middaugh wins Xterra Quebec for his 4th victory in 2018 season

Josiah Middaugh, of Eagle-Vail, finished first in an Xterra off-road triathlon competition in Quebec, Canada, on Aug. 18. The course received heavy rain the day before the race, which made the long and technical trails even more difficult.

From the Vail Daily
by Pamela Hunt

Eagle-Vail triathlete Josiah Middaugh captured the Xterra Quebec off-road triathlon elite title on Saturday, Aug. 18, at Lac Delage in Quebec, Canada.

It was his the fourth win of the season in the Xterra off-road triathlon’s Pan Am Tour.

Fellow Colorado racer Branden Rakita posted the fastest swim split in the race, followed by Ian King, of Virginia Beach, and Canadian Karsten Madsen. Middaugh exited the water a little more than one-minute later with Tour leader Kieran McPherson, of New Zealand, and the chase was on.

“I had a good swim and started the bike with Kieran about 1:30 down, but Karsten was riding strong up ahead, putting time on me in corners and descents,” Middaugh said. “I was pulling back time on some of the pedaling sections and finally caught him beginning the third loop.”

‘WAY OUT FRONT’

Madsen, who was on a mission to win for his home country, said he was putting time on everybody but Middaugh.

“This course had 3,000 feet of climbing, so that created a lot of back and forth with Josiah,” Madsen said. “I started to get the impression him and I were way out front.”

Those two were out front, but McPherson has been running faster than all the regulars on the Tour this year and was still a threat.

“On the run I had a small cushion to Karsten and a big gap to the rest of the field,” Middaugh said. “I looked at my Suunto and realized we were starting the run about the same time we would normally be finishing an Xterra, so I decided to fuel and pace the first lap and attack the second. The strategy worked and luckily I had something left in the tank.”

Indeed, the course was one of the longer and harder on the Xterra World Tour this year, and heavy rain on Friday added some time to the already long and technical bike trails.

“The trails are amazing but the speeds are slow with so many twists, turns, ups, downs, roots and rocks,” Middaugh said. “Made for a long, tough day.”

Madsen agreed.

Read the full story

Josiah Middaugh is a runner and mountain biker from Eagle-Vail who competes in the Xterra Pan Am Tour off-road triathlon series every year, winning the tour the last two seasons. While swimming is always Middaugh’s weakest discipline, on Saturday, Aug. 18, Middaugh exited the water in fourth alongside tour leader Kieran McPherson of New Zealand, setting himself up for his fourth Xterra win of the season.

We Are Triathletes Documentary to Show in Colorado

This film follows 6 triathletes from 4 countries (U.S., China, Germany, and Australia) and tells their stories of how they train and prepare for the world’s largest long distance triathlon race – the legendary CHALLENGE ROTH in Germany. The history of the early days of Ironman triathlon is also told by some of the Ironman legends.

Theater listings and tickets here

 

 

IRONMAN Boulder and IRONMAN Boulder 70.3 Is Here to Stay Through 2020

Having IRONMAN Boulder withdrawals? Well, we have good news to share! Clear out and make room in your race calendar for the next couple of years!

IRONMAN BOULDER AND IRONMAN 70.3 BOULDER EXTENDED THROUGH 2020

Boulder to continue to host exceptional race experience for an additional two years

TAMPA, Fla./BOULDER, Colo. (June 6, 2018) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, in partnership with the City of Boulder and the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau, have agreed to extend their partnership with the continuation of the IRONMAN® Boulder and IRONMAN 70.3® Boulder triathlons through 2020.

“Boulder is a city that provides a tremendous amount of support to the triathlon community while embracing the IRONMAN spirit,” said Tim Brosious, Race Director for IRONMAN Boulder. “We are thrilled to continue our partnership through 2020 and grow the rich culture that the sport has instilled in Boulder. We are looking forward to this weekend’s race as we continue IRONMAN events in this area.”

Located at the foot of the Flatiron Mountains, Boulder provides a central vacationing and training location for triathletes. The city’s health-conscious culture, refreshing weather and picturesque Colorado mountain views provide a sensational venue for athletes and spectators.

“We have been a proud sponsor of IRONMAN Boulder for five years,” said Tom McGann, Chair of the Board of Directors of the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Our working relationship with IRONMAN and the City of Boulder have only strengthened and grown during this time, and we are happy to announce the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau has committed to continuing our sponsorship of this event for 2019-2020”.

The 2018 IRONMAN Boulder will take place on June 10, 2018, while the IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder will be held on August 4, 2018. Over 4,000 athletes are registered for the 2018 events and approximately 20,000 spectators are expected to attend the races. A dedicated team of over 2,500 volunteers helps to make the event successful. The IRONMAN Foundation will distribute $60,000 in charitable giveback to non-profit initiatives and groups in the Boulder region in 2018.

“The City of Boulder is excited to continue to host both IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events over the coming years,” added Michael Eubank, Special Events Manager from the City of Boulder. “We look forward to what’s in store with this established partnership that brings race participants and our community together.”

Since first debuting in 2014, IRONMAN Boulder has become a staple in the IRONMAN race circuit. The race begins with a one-loop, 2.4-mile swim in the Boulder Reservoir, followed by a multi-loop, 112-mile bike course contained within Boulder County, featuring several pronounced climbs. Athletes then embark on a 26.2-mile marathon run from the Boulder Reservoir through residential neighborhoods to downtown Boulder and onto the Boulder Creek Trail, winding along the creek and through city parks. The finish line is on Pearl Street located in the heart of downtown Boulder.

IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder also provides athletes with a scenic and challenging course. Participants begin their journey with a 1.2-mile swim in the Boulder Reservoir, followed by a fast and flowing 56-mile single loop bike course through north Boulder County. The two-loop, 13.1-mile run course begins and ends at the Boulder Reservoir.

For more information, please visit www.ironman.com/boulder for the IRONMAN event and www.ironman.com/boulder 70.3 for the IRONMAN 70.3 event. Athlete inquiries may be directed to boulder@ironman.com and boulder70.3@ironman.com. For media inquiries, please email press@ironman.com.

2018 1st Endurance Team Announced

As you scroll through the list of athletes on the 2018 First Endurance Team, you may notice that more than half of them live and train in Colorado.   In addition, all of the new athletes added to their roster are from Boulder.

Among the new additions for the 2018 season is Maia Ignatz, a professional XTERRA athlete who lives, works and trains in Boulder.  Although recovering from a season ending injury in July 2017, Maia said she is ‘honored to be a part of the First Endurance Triathlon Team for 2018’. She adds, ‘I am grateful that First Endurance will be my nutrition during this crucial time for me, and I believe that I will be able to race again by mid-July. ‘

Watch for Maia at XTERRA Beaver Creek in July, XTERRA Pan Am Championships in September and on Maui in October for XTERRA World Championships.


2018 First Endurance Team

First Endurance is proud to announce its 17-member professional triathlon team for 2018. In 2017 the team earned high accolades; collectively the team won 4 podiums at world championships, set a World Record for the fastest IRONMAN (branded) time, set the fastest ever IRONMAN by an American, won the North American Ironman Championships, won 38 races and landed on the podium 81 times. For 2018 the team looks to continue to build upon these results while working hand in hand with First Endurance testing and collaborating in the development of products. Together with some of the best triathletes in the world, we continue to evolve our product line.

 

Returning Athletes:
Josiah Middaugh (FE athlete since 2004), Vail
Heather Wurtele (FE athlete since 2010)
Trevor Wurtele (FE athlete since 2010)
Cam Dye (FE athlete since 2011), Boulder
Branden Rakita (FE athlete since 2012), Colorado springs
Angela Naeth (FE athlete since 2013)
Matt Hanson – Fastest American IRONMAN, North American IRONMAN Champion (FE athlete since 2014)
Danielle Mack (FE athlete since 2014), Boulder
Kevin Collington (FE athlete since 2015)
Jeanni Seymour (FE athlete since 2016)
Tim Don – Current IRONMAN (branded) World Record Holder (FE athlete since 2017), Boulder

New Athletes:
Lindsey Jerdonek – ITU & long course triathlete, Boulder
Justin Metzler – long course triathlete, Boulder
Sam Long – XTERRA & long course triathlete, Boulder
Christen Brown – long course triathlete, Boulder
Maia Ignatz – XTERRA triathlete, Boulder
Jason West – short course triathlete, Boulder

 

Complete announcement here

 

Butterfield Wins Bermuda Marathon in 2:27

Always one to recognize and compliment the competition, as well as thanking the cheering crowds, Longmont’s Tyler Butterfield won yesterday’s Bermuda Marathon with grace, and gratitude.

From the Royal Gazette

Tyler Butterfield followed in the example set by Dage Minors in Friday’s Elite Mile when he ran to victory in the Bermuda Marathon yesterday in near-perfect running conditions.

Butterfield, Bermuda’s top male triathlete who returned from his home in Boulder, Colorado to compete for the first time in several years, set the pace after a 1hr 14min time for the first loop on his way to a winning time of 2:27:07 ahead of last year’s winner, Bryan Morseman, of the United States, who clocked 2:28:43. Third was Abu Kebede Diriba, of Ethiopia, in 2:37:44.

“I’ve done one marathon before and that was a 2:42 [time] when I was 21, a good 14 years ago,” Butterfield said after his victory. “I ran a 2:48 in an Ironman, so I knew with a 2:42 I should be able to improve on that.”

Butterfield ran several miles with another local runner, Chayce Smith, who was competing in the Bermuda Half-Marathon.

“Chayce and I ran the first lap together and it was great hearing everyone cheering us on,” Butterfield said. “It was nice to have some locals up the front.

“Bryan led me through the first half and then we ran the first mile or two [second loop] together before I pulled away just after Trimingham Hill.

“There was a slight downhill before the flat to McGall’s Hill and I had speed coming off the hill and just went with it. I thought I might regret it later because it was a little quick. The first lap was a negative split but I have to say there was a lot of people out there cheering. Thank you to the people who come out every year.”

Butterfield and Morseman were tucked in with the Half-Marathon lead pack, before the field started to open up after the two-mile mark and Butterfield carried on to win,

Butterfield still holds the senior schools mile record of 4:27:30, which he set in 1999 when a student at Saltus.

 

Read the full article

Women’s Wednesday: Colorado’s Sarah Thomas – the woman who swam a century and made history

Sarah Thomas © Ken Classen

 “…only three athletes active today have finished ‘current-neutral’ swims of 63 miles or more — all three of them women.”

Unnoticed and unfeted, a US swimmer is breaking the sport’s boundaries

From Financial Times

Last week Sarah Thomas got up at 5am and drove the 25 miles from her home to the swimming pool in Lakewood, Colorado, as she does most mornings. There she completed her 6,000-yard workout before heading to work as a healthcare recruiter. She was untroubled by autograph hunters; no TV crews stopped her to seek an interview.

And yet Thomas is, according to Steven Munatones, founder of the World Open Water Swimming Association, “an outlier, a once-in-a-generation athlete, and a motivator who is showing others how far they can push themselves”. In August she completed what must rank as one of 2017’s greatest achievements in endurance sport, swimming further than anyone — man or woman — has swum before without the assistance of currents: a scarcely believable 104 miles, nonstop, in three days and nights in the water.

“The record wasn’t really the big incentive for me,” Thomas tells me from her home in Denver. “It was about finding and pushing my personal limits.” What could be a weary trope coming from many athletes rings true from Thomas. She swims without sponsorship — fitting her training around her full-time job. Her achievements have received little media attention; her record-breaking swim has not, to date, even been mentioned in a national newspaper.

“Sarah herself doesn’t seek out publicity,” Ken Classen, her coach and training partner, tells me. “If it wasn’t for her friends and mother-in-law she’d probably have no publicity and quite frankly I don’t think she’d care either way.”

Last year Thomas swam a record 82 miles nonstop in Lake Powell but felt she could go further — the 100-mile barrier beckoned. In choosing the current-free Lake Champlain for her swim, Thomas was attempting something no one of either gender had previously done. “A few people have swum over 100 miles before,” explains Evan Morrison, co-founder of the Marathon Swimming Federation, that adjudicated Thomas’ swim, but only with the assistance of strong, predictable currents.

These include a 139.8-mile effort by the late Croatian swimmer, Veljko Rogosic, in the Adriatic. “His swim was very impressive, but it belongs in a separate category,” explains Morrison. According to his records, only three athletes active today have finished “current-neutral” swims of 63 miles or more — all three of them women.

Beat Knechtle, a Swiss doctor and endurance athlete who has studied female performance in open-water swimming, offers two possible explanations for this dominance. “Women have an advantage due to their higher body fat, which provides insulation against the cold and better buoyancy.” As wetsuits may not be worn for official open-water swims, this could be an important advantage. Then there is the mental side. “In open-water swimming women have learnt that they are able to beat men and therefore expect to compete at a higher level,” says Knechtle.

Thomas agrees. “Women have a long history of swimming: it’s been socially acceptable for us to be athletes in the pool and open water for much longer than in other sports. I think having that strong foundation has really helped women to compete and train at a high level.”

Read the full article

Colorado man, 75, dies following triathlon at Sudgen Regional Park, officials say

Sugden Regional Park in East Naples offers a host of activities, many centered around the 60-acre lake.

From Naples News

A Colorado man died following a triathlon at Sugden Regional Park in East Naples on Sunday, officials said.

A Collier County Sheriff’s Office deputy stationed at the event to coordinate traffic was alerted by a man about 7:20 a.m. that “there is a man in the water, not breathing,” according to a Sheriff’s Office incident report.

The deputy ran to the shoreline of the lake where he found a man, later identified as 75-year-old James Treadwell, lying on the sand and being tended to by a Collier County EMS paramedic, two race participants and Treadwell’s wife, the report states.

After confirming Treadwell had no pulse and wasn’t breathing, the group began cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Read the full story

303Radio Interviews Stryd’s Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson

303radio was in Boulder recently interviewing Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson of Stryd–the running power meter and finding out why it should be under the Christmas tree this year.

If you aren’t familiar with running with a power meter you will want to listen to this podcast to learn why running with power can help you be faster and more efficient.

 

Also, be sure to check out our full story on Stryd by Rich Soares from our Holiday Gift Guide.

Harvest Moon Long Course

Boulder

 

The Harvest Moon Triathlon the 19th edition of this event takes place at the beautiful Boulder Reservoir. on September 16th, 2018.  Est. in 2000 this Colorado classic  provides the veterans to beginners a challenging, affordable, and competitive race with a local flavor.  Whether this is your final event of the season, or a tune-up for a fall long course triathlon, don’t miss the Harvest Moon!  The Aquabike portion is one of the fastest growing Aquabikes in the nation, while the duathlon is Colorado’s only long-course duathlon.

 

Colorado Tri Series includes:

Colorado Triahlon

Boulder Peak Triathlon

Harvest Moon Long Course

Series details here

 

 

Event details and Registration here