Tri Boulder Race Preview

By Kirsten McCay

The 5th Annual Tri Boulder Sprint and Olympic Distance Triathlon is coming up and you don’t want to miss this race! This is a perfect tune-up race for the Boulder 70.3 which takes place in the same area 2 weeks later.

Compete in one of the fastest growing triathlons in Boulder. Swim in the beautiful Boulder Rez which is in the mid-70s right now, I swam in it with no wetsuit last weekend and it was perfect! Bike some of the smoothest (yay) and fastest (double yay) roads in Boulder. And run on the scenic dam trail which is a mostly flat and all packed dirt road. BBSC is a tri-friendly, professional race company that offers gender specific t-shirts, finisher medals, age group awards, Clydesdale and Athena categories, relays, race day child care, free entry into the reservoir, post-race food, and more.

This year I am doing the Olympic distance race and have already spent time on both courses and wanted to share with you what you are in for when you decide to do either of the races this year on July 23rd. I’m using the Olympic as a training race for USAT Age Group Nationals on August 12th. Either distance would be great for that or as mentioned above a tune-up race for Boulder 70.3 on August 6th.

SWIM: Currently the water in the reservoir is about 74 degrees. This is a great temperature that is warm enough for you to swim without a wetsuit if you don’t have one, but isn’t too warm to legally allow wetsuits if you are relying on that to help your swim time. The sprint course is a 750 meter clock-wise rectangle and the Olympic just doubles the distance out and back from the shore. There will be large buoys at each turn and small buoys for sighting. The swim is a wave start for safety and ease for beginner swimmers. Typically there are less than 100 people per wave.

BIKE: The bike course for the sprint is typically called the “Neva loop” and is basically a large loop around the NW part of Boulder. The sprint course is 17 miles, a little longer than the usual sprint distance, so if you are a cyclist, this race is for you! After leaving Reservoir Road, there is a very gradual climb for about 3 miles and then a fast rolling downhill for the next 10 miles. Once you are back on the Diagonal, it is another very slight incline for about 2 miles and then basically downhill (other than 2 short hills on the road back to the res) to the finish. The Olympic starts and ends the same way with a couple extra miles of slight incline rewarding us with several additional miles of declines! YAHOO!

RUN: The run for the sprint is primarily on dirt road and is a simple out and back around the res along the dam. There is a hill immediately when you leave transition, just remember it will be downhill on the way back when you need it the most. The Olympic is also an out and back, it just passes the sprint turn-around and goes an additional 1.55 miles slightly inclining to the 10K turn-around which will be fast for the return home to the finish line.

A great way to practice the swim and run is the Boulder Stroke & Stride which is a swim/run series held at the res every Thursday night. This will get you used to open water swimming, running up the beach, and that first hill on the run.

If you get to the Stroke & Stride, stop by and say “HI” to me at the “chip handout” table!!

And I hope to see you all out there on the 23rd.

303Radio Interviews Boulder Peak Tri Pro Champions, RD Panigutti, Siff

Cam Dye
Paula Findlay
Lindsey Jerdonek

Lindsey Jerdonek

SONY DSC
SONY DSC

The Pros racing the Boulder Peak

At present, there are 35 professional triathletes racing Sunday’s Peak – including some big names and out of state folks.

303 reached out to them and asked a few questions, including:

  1. Why are you racing the Peak?
  2.  If you have raced the Peak before, what is your favorite memory?
  3. How does the Olde Stage climb/descent fit into your race strategy?
  4. Any messages for other pros in the field?

Here are some of their responses:

Justin Metzler

  1. The Peak is the perfect opportunity to put some really hard training to good use. This is my fourth season as a PRO and I have almost exclusively raced the 70.3 distance. I have some international 70.3 races coming up on the calendar and with the Peak in my backyard, the chance to race full gas against some of the strongest guys in the world was too good of an offer to pass up on. As I have gotten older the pressure to perform and get results has gotten more significant every season. I was reflecting on when I was having the most fun racing. That was in 2014 when I did a few Olympic non-drafting races. I’m looking forward to 2hr of very intense suffering on Sunday. It is racing in it’s purest form and is a whole lot of fun.
  2.  This is my first time racing the peak!
  3.  I think it will be full gas from the minute we hop on the bikes to the apex of the Olde Stage climb. If you are not prepared to ride at or above your threshold for the entire segment, you will likely get spit off the back and never be able to regain contact with the front of the race. My #1 goal is to not over think this race. If I swim with the front and make it up Olde Stage with the front of the race, I will be in a very good position to have a solid result.
  4.  Bring it! The start list is looking quite strong but a lot of athletes are in unique situations. Charbot, Shoemaker, Long just raced IM Boulder. Von Berg and Deckard just got back from Europe. West and Dye have both done a lot of races lately. I have not raced since early June. I have been here in Boulder training hard as ever. I am fitter than I have been in a long time and I am looking forward to seeing what that means come Sunday.

Matt Chrabot

  1. It’s been a while since I’ve raced an Olympic Distance event and I’m glad it’s in my home area.
  2. Yes in 2014 and I won.
  3. Hopefully I can make up any lost ground from the swim by quickly popping up the climb. It’s a power climb so the bigger guys won’t be at a disadvantage and the smaller guys won’t gain as much.
  4. Best of luck and I’ll see you out there.

Kelly Williamson

  1.  Sounded like fun, seeing that I do mostly IM and 703 distances – and convenient to Colo Springs where I live.
  2. Last time I raced this (2006ish?) I did Mt Evans the day prior – so what I remember was that it was a pretty crappy race for me but it was a fun and clearly challenging weekend.
  3. I only know of this Olde Stage road by name, so I guess I’m going in  with eyes wide open; and I can’t say I have much of a race strategy except to go as hard as I can for as long as I can.
  4. Let’s play nice in the swim. We’re all going in the same direction. 🙂

Kaisa Lehtonen

  1. I am currently coached by Siri Lindley so I am training here in Boulder for the most of the summer with Siri and some other Team Sirius athletes.  Our main goal for this season is obviously IM World Champs, but Boulder Peak triathlon gives a great opportunity to put some speed in this “Ironman machine” :)! I have never done a non drafting olympic distance race before and I am super excited to see how it feels. Boulder is an amazing place to train in and the route of Boulder Peak Triathlon is just stunningly beautiful and hard at the same time and it will be super cool to test how I can manage the altitude, the heat and the old stage climb!
  2. I have not raced in here before. But it seems that the race has big traditions behind it so it is a huge honor to do the race that so many of the worlds best athletes have done during the last decades.
  3. I usually do love the climbs on the bike. However as I have never raced or trained at altitude before, here in Boulder the climbing seems to feel… let’s say not so enjoyable with a little less oxygen than normal. I will do my very best on the climb, but I will decide according to how I feel on race day if I will put my all into the climb or if I will save a little more energy for the later parts of the race.
  4. It is super exciting to toe on to the start line with you and it is great to see that so many of the very highest level olympic distance athletes will be doing this race.

Drew Scott

  1. I love racing in a hometown event and this race in particular has a lot of good memories for me. It’s been nearly 3 years since I’ve raced in Boulder so this one was a no brainer for me!
  2. My best memory is definitely winning the amateur race in 2011. It was just as I was getting into triathlon and completely unexpected for me so that made it even more special.
  3. Olde Stage is such an iconic climb in this race and I think really defines the whole event. This will be my 8th time racing the peak so I would like to think I’ve learned a few things about the ideal way to attack this course :). The race is usually sorted out by the top of Olde Stage so it helps to be very aggressive in those early miles on the bike.
  4. Haha…I won’t stir the pot. Lets see what happens on Sunday!

Rodolphe Von Berg

  1. I am racing the Peak because it is an iconic Boulder race, and now that the steep Old Stage climb is back on the bike course, it is a big attraction for me, it makes the race more exciting for everybody.
  2. I have never raced the Peak!

 

Alicia Kaye

  1. I am racing Boulder Peak because I love the opportunity to race at home. Though I’m not a full time Boulder resident, I spend nearly half the year here and the opportunity to sleep in my own bed and then get to race a competitive, well run event with prize money cannot be beat!
  2. This is my first time racing Boulder Peak!
  3. Since Olde Stage is fairly early into the 25mile bike, I’m not sure how much it’ll split up the field. I’ve never raced a non-draft Olympic distance event with this difficult a climb. I’m hopeful it’ll split things up enough that we get an honest bike race before hitting the the run!
  4. Let’s put on a show ladies!!

 

Jason West

  1. It’s a great opportunity to race some of the best athletes in the world right here where so many of us train. The course is also very difficult, something you don’t really see that often, so it makes it very exciting.
  2. Nope
  3. Difficult climbs are definitely spots where you can take a lot of time out of people, but you also need to play it really smart because it is just one section of the whole ride. The decent can also be pretty quick, so being a little gutsy there could pay off.
  4. Bring your A game!

Dan Feeney

  1. I am racing the Peak because I moved here two years ago and love the opportunity to have a pro olympic distance race in my (new) hometown!
  2. I am most looking forward the Olde stage since I love climbing and fast descents. As a lighter athlete, I prefer these to the flat and fast roads around the res.

Kennett Peterson

  1. I really enjoy all of Without Limit’s races and the effort they put into making such awesome events. I think it’s great that they’re brining back a pro field and prize money to Peak, and I want to support that by showing up. Also, it’s just two miles from my house, which means I can ride there. That’s a huge bonus.
  2. I’ve never raced it.
  3. When I was a bike racer I did a lot of my intervals on Olde Stage. I’ve probably ridden it close to 200 times at this point, so I know how to pace it: start out as hard as you can and gradually go harder. The descent takes like 39 seconds so it won’t really factor into any position gain or loss.
  4. After the Olde stage descent make sure to go left on Left Hand.

Brittany Warly

  1. I am racing Boulder Peak because my coach and I thought it would be a fun way to mix up my ITU draft-legal racing with a local non-draft race and to get back on the TT bike. Also because I went to school at CU Boulder and I was a proud member of the Colorado Triathlon Team, I thought that racing in Boulder in front of family and friends would be a great way to reconnect with those I haven’t seen in a year since graduating, plus it is always a blast racing in front of the Boulder crowd and having my family watch me race! I have nothing to lose, and I am excited to be racing against some of the best girls in the sport and to give it my all on race day.
  2. This is my first year racing as a professional, but I have raced Boulder Peak a few times in the age group and collegiate category. My favorite memory has been racing in front of my teammates and friends, and getting cheered on the whole way. In addition, I have so many memories training on the Boulder roads, throwing down with my teammates, so I always have visions of those experiences while I race, which motivates me to push harder.
  3. I am excited to be racing Old Stage for the first time! I am a strong climber and fearless on the descents, so I know that I can take advantage of this, while saving my legs for the run.
  4. I hope my racing speaks for itself 🙂

Will Jurkowski

  1. I’m racing Boulder Peak because I can ride my bike to the start – I live in Boulder only a few miles from the Res.
  2. I raced Peak once before, in 2014, as an amateur. I remember hearing about the Olde Stage climb but it wasn’t in the race that year from the flooding in Lefthand and the roads being torn up.
  3. The Olde Stage climb has meant specific preparation with lots of reps up the climb and understanding how hard I can push at various points to maximize my effort.
  4. Not really…

 

Jarrod Shoemaker

  1. I am so happy that Boulder Peak is back! I spent the first 11 years of my career chasing the ITU circuit around the world and only raced a handful on non-drafts in the US. I switched over to non-draft racing last May and have generally been training for long distance now, but I cannot pass up an opportunity to race on such an iconic course and race. I am so excited that Lance and the Without Limits team are working hard to bring this race back for the Pros.
  2. Have not raced before.
  3. I am excited to race a race with a nice climb, I am not as much of a climber as I used to be, and would love to be riding a road bike instead of a TT bike up and down it, but that being said I am just going to be smart about it. This race is basically a long climb from the Res to the top of Olde Stage about 25km long.
  4. I think it is so much fun to race against people that you know and train with. Cam Dye and Jason West are two of my training partners and are nailing the non-draft Olympic distance right now. I am just going to go out there and see how I can do!

Sam Long

  1. I’m racing the Peak because it’s the best Olympic distance event around. I love the climb on Olde Stage Road–it makes the race honest and fair. BP also got me into triathlon so I am stoked to revisit as a pro. I haven’t done an Olympic in years so it is gonna be fun to try the distance again.
  2. Crushing people’s souls on Olde Stage
  3. The climb fits in because it gives me space to catch the faster swimmers. It also allows me to push the descent and use my bike handling skills to my advantage.
  4. yeehaw!

Annika Pfitzinger

  1. I’d heard a lot about Boulder Peak over the years, even before I started racing triathlons, and decided this year would be a good time to test myself on Old Stage!
  2. This is my first time racing Boulder Peak but it hopefully won’t be my last.
  3. I’m going to work the uphill so that I lose as little as little time as possible on the descent! I’m not a very big person and my descending still needs a little work.
  4. This is my first official race as a pro and it sounds like I picked a great race to start with!

Cam Dye

  1. I am really excited to be back racing the Peak. It was the first race that I did when I was 15, and growing up in Boulder it has always been a special race to me. This year it will be even more special as it will be the first time that my kids have seen me race.
  2. Winning the race in 2012

 

Lindsey Jerdonek

  1. I can’t find a single reason NOT to race here at home.
  2. The crowd support on Olde Stage is awesome so that will help me up the punishing climb!
  3. Go hard. Be aggressive.
  4. I’m looking forward to a hard race, especially with my training partners, Paula and Alicia, in the field. They are incredible, hard-working athletes and I hold a lot of respect for them in approaching the Peak.

Mark on Monday: Making Triathlon Easier

Photo: Vox Efx on Flickr

By Mark Cathcart

With the race season well underway, and hopefully a few more races ahead this year, you’ll have gained a lot more experience. No doubt you’ll have had a chance to put to the test some of the tips you’ve heard from other triathletes, and read here on 303 Triathlon.

In this month’s Pragmatic triathlete, I’ll pass on five less well traveled tips aimed at making the remaining races of this season, and your training a little easier.

MAKE IT EASIER… on your head
No more chaffing! After a couple of months of sweating your helmet straps will start to get stiff. The best and easiest way to clean your straps is simply to get a bowl or dish that is narrower than the width of your helmet. Fill the bowl with hot (not boiling) water and add a tablespoon of vinegar. Sit your helmet on the bowl, allowing the straps to hang in the water. Leave it there overnight; capillary action will draw the water up the straps. Next morning throw the water away, rinse the straps under the cold tap, dry the straps with a towel and leave to dry. Then give a light coating with olive oil or similar, making sure you include the plastic retainers etc. which will aid in stopping them from cracking.

MAKE IT EASIER… on your feet
Clean shoes, clean mind! Many people regularly throw their running shoes in the washing machine with a load of towels to get them clean(1). You probably shouldn’t do the same with cycling shoes; even though these days few cycling shoes are leather, they have lots of other components and screws for cleats that you wouldn’t want to submerge in water and soak with soap.

You can overhaul them in a more traditional way with shoe cleaners and polish, but this can be tricky. One of the simpler ways to protect and clean cycling shoes is to get them a wipe down with a wet cloth, then a light spray with WD40. Once you’ve sprayed them, give them a wipe down with a soft dry cloth (old non-tech race t-shirt?)

This will both revive fading and grubby leather/pleather; it will also polish up and help protect any synthetic pieces and give the shoes a coating that will help protect them.

MAKE IT EASY… on your back
Core strength! Now your cycling and running are up to speed, doesn’t your lower back feel stiff from time to time? Try some specific stretches for your hamstrings, shoulders and lower back. The lower and upper halves of your body and anchored in your lower back and the more flexible and strong it is, the more fluid you will be.

Learn to love a foam roller, Boulder Bodyworker has some videos to help you get started.

MAKE IT EASIER… on the bike
Less rattle, more roll! You don’t need any special mechanic skills to keep your bike chain clean and lubricated. Even if you only use your race bike in the summer, when it’s dry, your chain will still pickup dirt and dust from the road which will make you less efficient. You should probably give your chain a quick clean weekly, and definitely after any ride where there was a lot of dry dust.

Serious cyclists will recommend buying expensive chain specific tools and brushes, and even removing the chain. You can do a basic job with it still on the bike. Use an old toothbrush or other stiff brush; use an old rag doused with some white spirit to remove old oil and dirt. I use bleach wipes for simplicity and speed; change the rag, drip oil around the chain and then gently remove any excess oil. The real trick is NOT to oil a dirty chain, it will make things worse, any dirt will just stick to the oil.

Don’t use WD40! Specialist oils are best, but if you don’t have any, you can use almost anything, baby oil, cooking oil, olive oil, just don’t over apply, wipe off the excess, and make sure you clean it thoroughly next time.

MAKE IT EASIER… in transition
Less stuff, more speed! Over recent years there has been a huge increase in the amount of “stuff” people take into transition. Athletes regularly tote huge plastic boxes into transition full of stuff, most of which they won’t need. To me this just says, “Novice: lacks confidence in race plan.” Take only the minimal stuff you actually need and will use during the race(2). Arrive early, set-up transition, and take everything else back to the car. With less mess, you’ll be faster in transition, no matter how orderly your stuff is, it will become a mess, it takes up valuable space and will slow down decisions.

Enjoy your upcoming races, next time I’ll take a look at some challenges to change things up.

1) Both cycling and running shoes will benefit from having their insoles removed and washed, especially running shoes, which will potentially have grit and talc after races. Pay attention to wear and tear of insoles, you can replace them, but they are also a good indication of the overall condition of the shoes themselves.
2) When you are out on the bike, the only things left in transition are swim googles, wetsuit and cap; and the equipment you’ll use on the run.

Mark Cathcart took up triathlon in the late 90’s to get fit for adventure racing, which to this day he has never done, and has since taken part in 170+ events. His pragmatic approach to training, racing, and life have lead in from being the Chairman of one of the bigger UK Triathlon clubs 15-years ago; British Triathlon volunteer of the year; a sometime race organizer; The organizer and ride leader for Austin Texas award winning Jack and Adams triathlon shop; doing sometime Sports Management for development and professional triathletes; he has attended all the Triathlon Business International, and Triathlon America conferences, where he usually asks the questions others won’t; moved to Colorado in 2016 and is a co-owner of Boulder Bodyworker

Celebrating Life: Craig Towler Freedom 5K and 10K Run

Photo: Daily Camera

From the Daily Camera

Craig Towler, the Boulder man who lost both of his legs after being crushed between two SUVs a year ago, is celebrating his “Alive Day” by helping with a Fourth of July run in his honor.

He said he learned about the idea of celebrating the anniversary of his close escape from death while recovering in the hospital.

“I really took that to heart,” he said. “We choose how we want to remember that day. Every year that we’re still here, that’s a good thing that needs to be celebrated.”

The company where he works, BBSC Endurance Sports in Boulder, decided to rename its annual Fourth of July 5K and 10K run as the “Craig Towler Freedom Run.” There’s also a virtual race option for those who won’t be in town for the event.

“We can move forward together,” Towler said.

He said he considers the Fourth of July the day he became a survivor.

That day, he spent the morning working BBSC’s Star Spangled Splash event at the Boulder Reservoir, timing his first race by himself.

As he was unloading his car in the 3300 block of Aurora Avenue after the event, Dylan Gottschling, who was 19 at the time, crashed his car into a parked black SUV at about 40 mph, pushing it about 12 feet into another parked SUV.

Towler was pinned between the two SUVs. He instructed his roommate and neighbor to lay him on the ground and create tourniquets out of their belts until paramedics arrived. Doctors told him the tourniquets saved his life.

Gottschling pleaded guilty to Class 5 felony vehicular assault operating or driving in a reckless manner and an added count of driving while ability impaired.

Police said Gottschling admitted to using heroin and then taking Xanax before the crash, along with admitting to looking down at his phone while trying to select music when the crash happened…

Read the full story

RELATED: 2016 BBSC TRI BOULDER Race Report – Community Rallies for Craig Towler

If you go:

What: Craig Towler Freedom 5K and 10K Run

When: July 4, registration starts at 6:30 a.m., run starts at 8 a.m.

Where: Boulder Reservoir, 5565 N 51st St., Boulder

Cost: 10K is $50, 5K is $45

IRONMAN Boulder interviews pro athletes; predictions for tomorrow’s race, PLUS tips & tricks

Local Boulder Pro Triathletes are happy to be racing in their “back yard,” offer tips for predicted heat… “I live right on the course…” “I know every inch of the road…” “Here, I’ve done intervals up Nelson, practiced going down St. Vrain…”

PLUS, IRONMAN asked athletes for their best “tips & tricks” for tomorrow’s race:

2017 Ironman Boulder Bike Course REVEALED

By Bill Plock

Ironman Boulder’s bike course is now THREE loops (passing through the Boulder Reservoir four times!), potentially faster, and should be tons of spectator-friendly fun!

(maps below!)

Ironman continues to refine this course, and after listening to athlete feedback proclaiming they want a more connected and spectator-friendly bike ride, the new course will feature three loops, passing through the reservoir area four times giving racers that extra boost of crowd energy. There, family and friends will be able to cheer and hang out at the beer garden, listen to music, swim in the lake and enjoy the time (and amazing views!) while waiting for their athlete to pass through.

IM Boulder Race Director Tim Brosious and Pro Triathlete Chris Leiferman

Food trucks will be there along with other entertainment and features still being planned. Shuttle buses will run throughout the day for easy transport between the Reservoir and downtown Boulder.

The course could potentially be faster, especially as racers will head east from Highway 36 on St. Vrain road with its nice downhill instead of on Highway 66 like the last three years. The three loops will still utilize most of the same roads as previous years, but on the last lap racers will spend time on a closed Four Mile Creek bike path for a couple of miles before dropping riders onto a few streets heading into T2.

An added plus? No Railroad crossings!

Pro Triathlete, Chris Leiferman, competing this year and who led the group on Saturday, said he “likes the bike path near the end as it’s quiet and will give everyone a chance to stretch out a bit and relax before hitting the run.”

Poppy Sports owner Melanie Mitchell, who isn’t currently signed up, says she is more tempted now after riding the course because, “Three loops mentally seems more attainable than 112 out in the middle of the plains.  Having done the 70.3 it is very familiar territory and training will be easier to ramp up mileage doing loops of the course.

Tim Brosious, the new race director (don’t worry Dave Christen will be around too—he is a regional director now), says, “This is a celebration day not only for the athlete but also for the families, friends, and supporters who have taken on extra responsibilities over the past year to make sure their athlete has a memorable day and crosses the finish line with a sense of fulfillment and pride.

Join the Strava Team Colorado group and get out and practice the loops and see how you stack up with others doing the same.

303Radio podcast featuring North American Race Director Dave Christen and new Ironman Boulder Race Director Tim Brocious, discussing Ironman Boulder features, course preview, and Team Colorado:

Check out all the photos from our 303Radio Podcast HERE.

Here is the official course map!

 

5430 SPORTS RETURNS TO BOULDER

THE 5430 TRIATHLON SERIES IS BACK
History repeats itself as Lance Panigutti joins forces with Barry & Jodee Siff to bring back the iconic “5430 Triathlon Series” in 2017:
The Colorado Sprint Triathlon on June 3rd, 2017
 The Boulder Peak Triathlon on July 9th, 2017 complete with a Pro Prize Purse of $25,000!
 The original 5430 Triathlon (formerly the 5430 Long Course) on September 17th, 2017
A sprint, an Olympic, and a Half… all from one of the best venues in America – the Boulder Reservoir – and all on their original courses…of course including Olde Stage Road in the Peak.
Barry & Jodee sold the Series to Ironman in 2009, and much has changed since then.  Those who experienced the 5430 events from 2004-2009 have said a lot of the heart and soul of the events, plus the incredible feel and attention to the athlete, has been lost in recent years.  Lance and the Siffs aim to bring that back.
“Jodee’s awards, our Tri Sustainability Program, the amazing raffle prizes, awesome t-shirts and finisher medals, the really cool start to the races, and our commitment to the athletes… this is what we are excited about bringing back to Boulder,” says Barry Siff from his home in Tucson.
Lance Panigutti, Owner and Founder of the very successful Without Limits race production company, adds: “I have long known something’s been missing in the Boulder triathlon scene, and that was what 5430 had going with its huge events which sold out every year. I want to bring that back to Boulder, the true Mecca of triathlon.  Our athletes – pro and age groupers – deserve it!”
Registration opens up on Thursday December 15th, the 5430 Triathlon Series package – all three races – are just $300 …but just for just two weeks!  This “early-bird special” will expire at 11:59 pm on December 31st, or when 300 individuals have registered … whichever comes first.  This total price for three races is just about what some people pay for one race!
In the past, the 5430 Sprint would actually sell out – in excess of 1,600 athletes – in just three weeks; and, this joint venture hopes for much of the same… although, all races will initially be limited to the first 1,200 registered to maintain the small and local feel.
So what else can you expect for the 2017 triathlon season?  We’ll continue to release fun news throughout the spring, but you can be sure to expect the Colorado Triathlon hooded sweatshirts, the famous Without Limits Slip n’ Slide, Flippin Flap Jacks and Wahoos Fish Tacos catering the races, and so many more new additions this season!
For more information and to register please visit

Locally Grown: Colin Laughery 303TV

By Kenny Withrow

We get an inside look into what a typical training day looks like for Colin Laughery. Colin is a mentor for “At Risk” kids at a local Middle School. Before and after work, Colin has to find the time to keep up with his training schedule as a Professional Triathlete.