Tri Coach Tuesday: Announcing the 303Triathlon Beginner Tri Project


Inspired by the USA Triathlon and IRONMAN “Time to Tri Initiative,” 303Triathlon is excited to launch the 303 Beginner Tri Project. As with the Time to Tri Initiative, the goal of the 303 Beginner Tri Project is to attract new athletes – and new people who don’t realize that they are athletes! – to the sport of triathlon.

Alison Freeman, 303 Triathlon Staff Writer and USAT Certified Coach with D3 Multisport, will publish regular columns specifically focused on information helpful to beginners, answering basic questions about equipment, training, and racing. Alison will also be moderating the new 303 Beginner Tri Facebook Group, a community where new triathletes can post questions, accomplishments, setbacks, and encouragement.

Within the 303 Beginner Tri Facebook Group, we will focus on a series of beginner-friendly triathlons throughout the season. Alison will post workout goals and key workouts leading into select races, and group members are encouraged to work together to accomplish those goals!

If you are interested in toeing the start line of your first triathlon, or know someone who is (or should be!), please join the 303 Beginner Tri Facebook Group and keep an eye on 303 Triathlon for our first beginner column next week.

Winter Training: Best Snowshoe hikes in Colorado – Top 5 trails for beginners

From The Denver Post

With snow flying in Colorado’s mountains, an off-road trek can reward those who make it with stunning views of frozen lakes and waterfalls, slopes that glisten in the sun and the deep hush of wilderness.

But an enjoyable experience isn’t likely if each step is a struggle through deep snow.

Enter snowshoeing, which is among the fastest growing winter sports in the world, according to the Winter Wilds Alliance.

“If you can walk, you can snowshoe,” said Alan Apt, author of “Snowshoe Routes Colorado’s Front Range.”

“It doesn’t require special skills like skiing does,” Apt said. “And unlike skis, you’re not going to kill yourself going downhill, or slide backwards going uphill. There is a minimal learning curve.”

People have relied on snowshoes to cross deep, snowy terrain for thousands of years.

Snowshoes spread the wearer’s weight evenly across a large, flat surface area so the foot doesn’t sink into the snow, and provide “flotation,” a quality that, coupled with spikes to grip the snow, allows for hiking and climbing, according to outdoor retailer REI.

“Don’t be overly ambitious that first time out. Do something short and easy and make it a fun trip. If it is a death march,” Apt said, “they won’t want to go back out. If the snow is deep and fresh, it’s good, but it takes more energy and can be challenging.”

For a wilderness adventure, Apt suggests the trails that lace Rocky Mountain National Park. For one thing, “there are three ranger- led snowshoe hikes each week.” The park also offers a beginner showshoe from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturdays through March 4, at the Kawuneeche Visitor Center. (Reservations required.)


5 hikes for beginner snowshoers

1. Sprague Lake – Rocky Mountain National Park

This flat, half-mile trail circles the lake, which lies in the shadow of magnificent peaks. “This will make a good family outing,” Apt said. Access the trail from Bear Lake Road on the east side of the Rocky Mountain National Park.

2. Bear Lake – Rocky Mountain National Park

Bear Lake offers scenic lake views at 9,475 feet. The trail is just over a half mile and runs near the base of Hallett Peak and Flattop Mountain. There is a slight elevation gain, but overall it is an easy hike, Apt said.

Find the trail at the end of Bear Lake Road in Rocky Mountain National Park.

3. Mud Lake – Boulder County Open Space

This small Boulder County Open Space park north of Nederland has good beginner snowshoeing trails. There are two short loop trails— the 0.8 mile Tungsten Loop and the 1.1 mile Kinnikinnick Loop— and the 1.5 mile out and back Caribou Ranch Link.

“You can go around on a very easy short outing, or go up on the hills. The trail is well marked and heavily used, so you’re not likely to get lost,” said Apt, who lives in the area. Find the trailhead off of Colorado 72, aka Peak to Peak Highway.

4. Echo Lake Park – Denver Mountain Parks

This Denver Mountain Parks trail system gives snowshoers an easy, flat and smooth trek near Echo Lake at the base of Mount Evans. Find the trailhead by taking exit 240 off of Interstate 70 near Idaho Springs and then following Colorado 103 to parking just north of the Mount Evans entrance station.

5. Hidden Valley – Rocky Mountain National Park

At this reclaimed ski area tucked into Rocky Mountain National Park, recreational trails head up the valley. For beginners, it’s best to go when trails are already packed in— not first thing in the morning after a storm. Find the trailhead just past Beaver Ponds on Trail Ridge Road, which is closed for the season a few miles ahead at Many Parks Curve. Distance: go out as far as you like, then come back.

Other places to look for a trail:

• lists events as well more than 3,300 trails nationwide in a clickable map.

• The Breckenridge and Frisco Nordic centers each have more than 12 miles of snowshoe trails. Rentals and tours are available.  breckenridgenordic. com or

• Devil’s Thumb Ranch near Tabernash has more than 12 miles of marked snowshoe trails.

• Leadville and Lake County have a groomed trail network that includes the Mineral Belt Trail as well as a network at the Mount Massive Golf Course and a snowshoe trail to Interlaken in Twin Lakes.


Complete article here

Swim Clinic


The coaches of Vixxen Racing will be hosting a FREE open water swim clinic targeting for beginner open water swimmer, but all levels of open water swimming ability are welcome.  

What does the clinic cover? How to ease the nerves of your first mass start, how to breathe, swimming in a straight line, putting on a wetsuit without ripping it to pieces, how to take off a wetsuit without falling over, how to train for the open water in a pool, and everything else related to your open water experience.


Limited to the first 25 people to RSVP to maintain a small coach to athlete ratio.

Clinic is FREE for all Stroke & Stride registrants, but you must RSVP 

Note: If you’d like to just attend the clinic and participate in that night’s Stroke & Stride  the cost is $10


Event details and registration here

Women’s Beginner Bike Maintenance Clinic



You did it. You bought your first bike and you have been enjoying riding it all up and down the front range. But when it comes to actually taking care of your bike, much less knowing what to do when you get your first dreaded flat, you are a bit paralyzed. Let us take the stress out riding and arm you with the tools you need to keep biking longer and more confidently.

Learn the basics of care, maintenance, and safety from CMS’s own Caitlin Standifer and D3’s Alison Freeman. They will be teaching you everything from what are the basic parts of your bike to how to efficiently and confidently change a flat tire. Have more advanced questions? Our mechanic will be standing by to answer any and all questions you may have as it pertains to your bike and you. Food and beverage will be provided.