Longmont Triathlon Needs You!

The Longmont Triathlon is the longest running triathlon in the State of Colorado.  Now in it’s 38th year!

No event can ever be successful with out a full compliment of volunteers.  Race Director Sara Taylor is looking for folks to help make this great weekend a huge success.  Read on to see how you can help by volunteering for this great event.

Recreation and Golf services is planning for the 38th Longmont Triathlon Weekend on June 2nd and June 3rd.  We need volunteers to keep the athletes safe and motivated on the course.  This is a wonderful opportunity for families, students, athletic teams, churches, and business organizations to give back to the community, team build, and gather volunteer hours.  Youth 16 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

Please consider joining us to cheer, direct participants, hand-out water, or help with registration and/or hospitality.  We need help on Saturday, June 2nd from 7am to 11am and on Sunday, June 3rd from approximately 6:15am to 11am.  If you can help, please email Sara Taylor (sara.taylor@longmontcolorado.gov)  with your job preference, day/days you can help and your contact information.  You are welcome to volunteer for one day or both!

Thank you in advance for your time and energy.  This event wouldn’t be the same without smiling faces and encouraging cheers.

 

Gain some inspiration from these great stories shared by first time participants over the past several years.  Watch for more of these fun and inspiring Story Bowl Stories over the next several weeks.

 

Longmont Tri Participant, Greg Thompson, First Timer Athlete

2006.  My daughter was 9 and I was 38.  She was on a synchronized swim team and I was swimming a handful of times per month, but had not ridden a bike in over a decade and was slow jogging only 2 miles, when I saw the advertisement for kid and adult tri.  I asked my daughter, quite out-of-the-blue, if she would do the kid event and I would do the adult tri.  She rapidly replied ‘yes’.  Suddenly I was in shock and it was only 5 weeks away!  I felt like dying as I gasped for air across the finish line that first time,  This was the start of a terrific journey and 6 years later, I competed in my first iron distance tri in North Carolina and was 2nd in my age group.  Now after two knee surgeries, I’m back for my 9th Longmont Tri.

 

Longmont Tri Participant, Kevin Pallaoro, First Timer Athlete

About 8 month ago, I took my 3 yr old daughter to her first swim lesson and she asked why I couldn’t teach her to swim.  My response sparked something in me.  The reality is  that I didn’t know how to swim.  Three days later I signed up for masters swim and started my journey towards my first tri.  

I chose Longmont since it was a pool swim and my wife works for the city  I a very excited for my first ever tri and a new found love for swimming.

Transition: The Fourth Discipline of Triathlon

by Kim Welk, Team W Coaching

 

There is an additional discipline of triathlon outside of the swim, bike, and run. That discipline is the Transition. Transition as defined means “the process or a period of changing from one state or condition to another.” The transition in triathlon is used to move from swim to bike and then bike to run and is equally as important as each of the triathlon legs.

Before the race begins, it is important to set up your transition so you can move quickly and efficiently when you arrive. Find a place to rack your bike. If racks are numbered find your designated spot. If racks are not numbered, select a location that works for you. Know where you are in relation to the bike in/out and the run in/out and the fastest route to get there. Find a permanent landmark that will be easy to spot when you come out of the water so you can easily locate your bike. (Note: Permanent on the landmark – cars move!) Rack your bike. Your bike should hang on the transition rack by your seat. If rack is numbered your front wheel should be facing the same direction as the number.

Here is a list of items that are helpful to set up transition:
*Transition Mat/Towel – This will be your staging area
*Bike Pump – Check your A,B,C’s when you arrive (Air, Brakes, Cassette,Chain)
*Gear – Check your bike gear. Are you in the right gear for the terrain at the mount line
*Flat Kit – Should be on your bike (Tube, CO2 cartridge, CO2 adapter, tire lever, tool)
*Hydration/Nutrition – Should be on your bike
*Swim Gear – Body glide to help with wetsuit, items below to take with you to start
*Bike Gear – Layout items below in orderly fashion so you don’t forget anything
*Run Gear – Layout in separate column from bike gear so you don’t mix them up

Once your transition is set-up, take a look at your location. Confirm that your landmark is still relevant, gather your swim gear and head to the swim start.

Here is a list of items that are helpful for the swim:
*Tri Kit/Swimsuit
*Wetsuit
*Watch/Heart Rate Monitor
*Cap (typically provided by the race)
*Goggles (bring lens options depending on light)
*Earplugs (if you use them)
*Timing Chip

 

As you arrive in transition the first time – known as T1 – you have just exited the swim. In this transition your goal is to move from the swim to the bike.

Here is a list of items that are helpful in T1:
*Small towel – your feet will be wet and may have debris
*Check to make sure you still have your timing chip (DO NOT REMOVE)
*Socks (optional) – don’t make race day the first time that you cycle without socks
*Cycling Shoes or Running Shoes if flat pedals
*Helmet – mandatory to race
*Sunglasses (store them in your helmet so they don’t get crushed!)
*Cycling Gloves (optional) but if you are used to riding with them, bring them

Remove your swim items. Place to the side of your transition area so they don’t interfere with what you need access to. Get your biking items on. Make sure your helmet is securely fashioned and head to the bike mount line. Do not get on your bike before the mount line. Enjoy the ride!

 

Welcome to T2. You have just completed the ride, dismounted at the dismount line and are now walking/running with your bike to your transition spot. Remember your landmark! When racking your bike after the ride, it is most efficient to rack by your handle bars. Hang your hoods over the rack. Remove your biking gear and prepare to run.

Here is a list of items that are helpful in T2:
*Socks (you may decide to change socks between bike & run)
*Running Shoes
*Check to make sure you still have your timing chip (DO NOT REMOVE)
*Race Belt/Race Bib
*Hat
*Sunglasses
*Handheld hydration/nutrition (if necessary)

Once you have switched out your bike and run gear. Head to the Run Out and begin your run! You have reached the final leg of the triathlon. Enjoy the run!

After the race is over, take time to reflect on your transitions. Did you have everything that you needed? Did you forget anything? What adjustments can you make to gain efficiency and time at the next race? Build transition practice into your training and develop habits that will allow you to use autopilot on race day. Attend a transition clinic to gain additional tips! Do not hesitate to ask questions. If you have the question, someone else does too! Enjoy the race!! It’s Time to Tri!

 

About Coach Kim Welk

As a lifelong athlete, I believe health and wellness are achievable for anyone through coaching.

From children to adults, helping people achieve health and wellness goals while embracing their lifestyle journey is my passion. I love to observe the impact that owning your health and wellness has on all aspects of your life. I have helped children reached the targeted finish in running and triathlon, and helped adults reach the finish of their first 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon, Marathon, Triathlon and more. The support extends beyond the finish line to focus on work-life balance, home-life balance and the ability to see the impact on your day to day performance. I incorporate a “one day…one step” mentality and follow the same philosophy in my daily life.

Time to Tri: 303Radio Chats with Barry Siff

Recently USA Triathlon and IRONMAN teamed up and created the Time to Tri Initiative aimed at attracting 100,000 new athletes into the sport of Triathlon. In this podcast, Barry Siff, President of the USAT Board of Directors discussed how this initiative came to be, what it means for local races and how it will impact the sport overall. The program hopes to inspire grass roots approaches to making triathlon more accessible.

At 303Triathlon, we are starting the “303 Beginner Tri Project”. We will tackle some fundamental challenges beginners face and offer workout goals and key workouts for local races and encourage new triathletes to gather for information and group training opportunities. Stay tuned for more on this. Meanwhile, take a listen to this podcast with Barry!”

 

Longmont Try-a-Tri

Longmont

 

Are you new to the sport of Triathlon, recovering from injuries, just getting into shape, learning how to swim, bike, and run (all together or learning a new skill), and a full sprint distance triathlon would be a bit too much? Then, the Longmont Try-a-Tri (super-sprint triathlon distance) is the right Triathlon for you to take on!

The Longmont Try-a-Tri is not about what place you finish in, it is about having fun while finishing a TRIATHLON!

Distances:

  • Swim – 200 yards
  • Bike – 4.5 miles – 3x around the bike course
  • Run – 2K (1.2 miles) – an out and back course on the side walk and bike path

 

Event details and registration here

Costco Magazine features Triathlon advice for Beginners

 

 

USA Triathlon President Barry Siff  was instrumental in boosting beginner triathlon information through Costco’s monthly magazine:

 

 

Sprint to the Finish

By Chrystle Fiedler, From Costco Connection

EVER DREAMED ABOUT competing in a triathlon? You’re not the only one. According to USA Triathlon, the organization that oversees all of the nation’s triathlon races, triathlons are growing in number.

One reason is the sprint triathlon, which features shorter distances per discipline (a half-mile swim, 12.4-mile bike ride and 3.1-mile run) than the much more demanding Ironman challenge (a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run). “Anyone can train for a triathlon, regardless of their age, as long as they swim, bike and run to build fitness,” says Joe Friel, author of Your First Triathlon: Race Ready in 5Hours a Week (Velo Press, 2012; not available at Costco). “It’s definitely doable.”

“Most athletes who are new to the sport don’t have an endurance background or equipment they’ll need for longer distances, so competing in a sprint triathlon is a good way to test the waters,” says Debi Bernardes, a triathlete and tri coach trainer (ucandoitcoach.com) based in Virginia…

 

Read the full article here

Tri Boulder Race Preview

By Kirsten McCay

The 5th Annual Tri Boulder Sprint and Olympic Distance Triathlon is coming up and you don’t want to miss this race! This is a perfect tune-up race for the Boulder 70.3 which takes place in the same area 2 weeks later.

Compete in one of the fastest growing triathlons in Boulder. Swim in the beautiful Boulder Rez which is in the mid-70s right now, I swam in it with no wetsuit last weekend and it was perfect! Bike some of the smoothest (yay) and fastest (double yay) roads in Boulder. And run on the scenic dam trail which is a mostly flat and all packed dirt road. BBSC is a tri-friendly, professional race company that offers gender specific t-shirts, finisher medals, age group awards, Clydesdale and Athena categories, relays, race day child care, free entry into the reservoir, post-race food, and more.

This year I am doing the Olympic distance race and have already spent time on both courses and wanted to share with you what you are in for when you decide to do either of the races this year on July 23rd. I’m using the Olympic as a training race for USAT Age Group Nationals on August 12th. Either distance would be great for that or as mentioned above a tune-up race for Boulder 70.3 on August 6th.

SWIM: Currently the water in the reservoir is about 74 degrees. This is a great temperature that is warm enough for you to swim without a wetsuit if you don’t have one, but isn’t too warm to legally allow wetsuits if you are relying on that to help your swim time. The sprint course is a 750 meter clock-wise rectangle and the Olympic just doubles the distance out and back from the shore. There will be large buoys at each turn and small buoys for sighting. The swim is a wave start for safety and ease for beginner swimmers. Typically there are less than 100 people per wave.

BIKE: The bike course for the sprint is typically called the “Neva loop” and is basically a large loop around the NW part of Boulder. The sprint course is 17 miles, a little longer than the usual sprint distance, so if you are a cyclist, this race is for you! After leaving Reservoir Road, there is a very gradual climb for about 3 miles and then a fast rolling downhill for the next 10 miles. Once you are back on the Diagonal, it is another very slight incline for about 2 miles and then basically downhill (other than 2 short hills on the road back to the res) to the finish. The Olympic starts and ends the same way with a couple extra miles of slight incline rewarding us with several additional miles of declines! YAHOO!

RUN: The run for the sprint is primarily on dirt road and is a simple out and back around the res along the dam. There is a hill immediately when you leave transition, just remember it will be downhill on the way back when you need it the most. The Olympic is also an out and back, it just passes the sprint turn-around and goes an additional 1.55 miles slightly inclining to the 10K turn-around which will be fast for the return home to the finish line.

A great way to practice the swim and run is the Boulder Stroke & Stride which is a swim/run series held at the res every Thursday night. This will get you used to open water swimming, running up the beach, and that first hill on the run.

If you get to the Stroke & Stride, stop by and say “HI” to me at the “chip handout” table!!

And I hope to see you all out there on the 23rd.

Reverse Indoor TRYathlon #3

Lone Tree

 

This is the perfect starting point to try a triathlon.  Event will take place at  the Cool Creek Pool in Lone Tree.  Distances will be recorded after each event during the 5 minute transitions.  Each participant will receive a towel with registration, along with a certificate at the completion of the race with the distances covered during each event.

This race is about completion, not competition; therefore, no individual winners will be awarded.  All athletic levels are welcome.  The only perquisite is that you must be able to swim unassisted in deep water.  Ages 14 – Adults.

 

Event details and registration here

South Suburban Indoor TRYathlon

Centennial

Sprint, Spin, Swim!

This is the perfect starting point to try a triathlon.  Events will take place inside the Goodson Recreation Center on the running track, spinning bikes, and swimming pool.  Distances will be recorded after each event during the 5 minute transitions.  Each participant will receive a towel with registration, along with a certificate at the completion of the race with the distances covered during each event.

This race is about completion, not competition; therefore, no individual winners will be awarded.  All athletic levels are welcome.  The only perquisite is that you must be able to swim unassisted in deep water.  Ages 14 – Adults.

 

Event details and registration here

Reverse Indoor TRYathlon

Sprint, Spin, Swim!

This is the perfect starting point to try a triathlon.  Events will take place inside the Goodson Recreation Center on the running track, spinning bikes, and swimming pool.  Distances will be recorded after each event during the 5 minute transitions.  Each participant will receive a towel with registration, along with a certificate at the completion of the race with the distances covered during each event.

This race is about completion, not competition; therefore, no individual winners will be awarded.  All athletic levels are welcome.  The only perquisite is that you must be able to swim unassisted in deep water.  Ages 14 – Adults.

Date and Location

Sunday, January 29, 2017 at the Goodson Recreation Center in Centennial.

Waves begin at 7:30 am.  Specific waves times will be determined and communicated to participants by the race director 5 days prior to the event.

Allotted Time

Event Allotted Time
Run 20 minutes
Bike 30 minutes
Swim 10 minutes