How to Wildflower! Your Complete Guide to this Longstanding, Epic Triathlon

By Alison Freeman

Maybe you’ve signed up for Wildflower (what’s Wildflower? ) and haven’t quite sorted out your logistics for the epic weekend of triathlon, camping, beer, wine, and music. Or maybe you’ve always wanted to sign up for Wildflower, but have been holding back because sorting out the BYO details is just too overwhelming. (Do I have to eat freeze dried camp food for my pre-race dinner? Is there an option besides instant coffee? Where do I shower? No, really. WHERE DO I SHOWER???) No worries, I’ve got all your answers right here.

Jump to: Travel – Shelter & Showers – Food & WaterEverything Else


Assuming that you’re not driving to the race, Monterey Regional Airport is the closest airport to Lake San Antonio … but doesn’t seem to serve direct flights from Denver. Given that, your best bet is to fly into San Jose Airport, although San Francisco and Oakland are also decent options. You’ll need to rent a car, as the race site is not Uber-able from the airport. Don’t want to deal with flying with your bike and then having to rent an enormous, expensive SUV? ProBike Express, your local bike concierge, will offer bike + bag + tent + anything else you need transport services if there is sufficient interest; TriBike Transport serves the race as well.

Plan for a 2-1/2 to 3 hour drive from the airport down to Lake San Antonio, but make sure to buffer an extra 30-60 minutes to stop for provisions along the way (see “Food & Water” below). Your best bet is to hit up Salinas, which is about halfway from San Jose Airport to Lake San Antonio and serves as a convenient place to stock up on supplies for the weekend. There’s a Costco, a Walmart, a Target, and a Safeway, so between the four you should be able to find pretty much everything you need. There’s also an In-N-Out Burger in Salinas, and if you don’t stop and get a double-double animal style, we’re going to have a serious conversation about your priorities.

If you find yourself 15 minutes south of Salinas and realize you forgot the key ingredient for your famous campfire mac-n-cheese, you can stop at the Safeway in King City, which is about an hour outside of Lake San Antonio. For real this is the last place to find provisions, so check your list twice before driving off.

Finally, you’ll want to plan your trip timing around the road closures within Lake San Antonio Park. All roads in the park are closed on Saturday from 7am-3pm and on Sunday from 8am-3pm. Regardless of what race you’re eyeing, plan to arrive no later than Friday and leave late Sunday afternoon. (Already made travel arrangements that conflict with road closures? You can park at North Shore campground and take a boat shuttle to/from the race site.)

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There are a myriad of great lodging options available for Wildflower, as long as you’re not dead set on turn down service and a chocolate on your pillow: there are no hotels to be found anywhere near the race site. Here’s what is available:

Camping is available at a number of campgrounds surrounding the Lake. You can lock in advance reservations HERE. Individual spaces are first-come-first-served, so if you’re picky about locations, plan to arrive at the race site on Thursday rather than Friday. Camping is $25/person/night for everyone over 16.

RV parking is available at the campgrounds as well with the same logistics and pricing as tent camping. (The limited number of RV spots with hookups are, unfortunately, sold out.) You can bring your own RV or you can arrange to have one delivered to the campsite if a two-day drive each way doesn’t fit your schedule.

While sadly the super-cool Tinker Tins are sold out for 2018, there is still limited available for the Bell Tents (think: Glamping), at $950 for the full three nights. If you like the idea of camping but want to add a little civility, or just back support, to the weekend, I’d jump on these quickly – more info HERE.

For all of these lodging options, standard campground bathrooms should typically be no more than a few hundred yards away. Some of these will have showers, some won’t, so get the lay of the land ahead of time and strategize shower timing to avoid the crowds.

If you really can’t get past the idea of a private, hot shower, AirBnB and VRBO are great sources for rentals surrounding Lake San Antonio, and there are hotels in nearby Paso Robles, approximately 35 miles from the Lake. If you do stay outside the park, keep those Saturday and Sunday road closure times in mind, and plan to pay the $10/person/day Festival pass rates upon entering the Park.

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This is the area where your advance planning skills really get tested. You do want to think through ALL of your food and drink needs prior to heading to Wildflower for the weekend.

• Water – Yes, you need to bring your own water. Maybe a half gallon per day per person? Maybe even a smidge more to account for race day requirements.

• Race Fueling – Breakfast / pre-race nutrition; Race nutrition; Post-race nutrition. If it’s a powder-based product, make sure you’ll have sufficient water AND sufficient clean water bottles. If it’s real food, see next item …

• Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner – How many days? What do you want to eat? How are you going to cook it? How are you going to store it? If you’re going to cook, you’ll need to bring your own skillet, pots, plates and utensils, and be sure to grab a cooler – styrofoam or the real deal – when you stop for provisions. You can grab ice, firewood, and lighter fluid at the small, very basic, general store onsite.

• Want to restock mid-weekend? In addition to the small, onsite store, Oak Hill Market is roughly 15 minutes outside the park and is about the best general store there is: quality meats, great produce, wine, barbecue supplies, eggs, and a great deli. (There’s also a gas station here – the nearest one I believe – if you are running low!)

• Don’t want to cook over a fire? – Welcome to my world. Thankfully we won’t be left to starve – there will be a wide variety of food trucks at the festival all weekend, and they will mostly be serving healthy/gourmet food rather than traditional carnival food truck fare. Save for your 5am pre-race meal, the food trucks will have you covered. Pro tip: TriCalifornia is exploring a cashless system for festival vendors, including food trucks. Keep an eye out for more info on their website and Facebook page!

• Must. Have. Pasta. – No duh. There’s a pasta party Friday night. Did you really think they’d leave you hanging? Tickets will be available online starting in Mid-March ($12 adults / $6 under 16) and you can buy tickets onsite if that’s more your style ($14 / $8), but only those who buy tickets in advance get a second serving.

• But what about coffee??? – Yup, they thought of that too. Nate Dressel, former pro triathlete, will be there with his new venture, Frontier Coffee. Just be prepared to stand in a long line if your morning routine involves anything incorporating the word “latte.”

And if reading all that just gave you an enormous headache, there are a limited number of $200 VIP packages remaining that cover breakfast, lunch and dinner for the entire weekend. You can add this option to your campground reservation, Bell Tent reservation, or pre-purchased Festival day pass upon checkout through

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So then … Travel: Check. Shelter: Check. Showers: Check. Food & Water: Check. …


You’ve sorted through the headache of a race venue where everything – literally, EVERYTHING – is BYO. So now what? TIME TO PARTY!!! Just kidding. Well, not really. Pretty much the whole point of Wildflower is that it’s not just a race, it’s an entire weekend of awesomeness. And to experience all of this awesomeness properly, it’s going to require just a little more advance preparation.

First off, in the weeks leading into the Wildflower Experience weekend, TriCalifornia is going to release the official Wildflower app. (Yup, there’s an app for that.) Given the very limited cell service at Lake San Antonio – no, I would not anticipate any wifi hotspots – you’ll want to download this app before race weekend. Then, while you still have cell service, make sure the maps and shuttle schedules are loaded, and review the race weekend schedule. Within the app you can reserve spots for activities and services – as in: post-race massages and pedicures – and you’ll want to do this before race weekend.

Minus scheduling your massage, you can take advantage of much of the race weekend awesomeness on a more spontaneous basis. Plan for lots of time hanging around the campsite – pack your Eno hammock, or consider grabbing a cheap-o lawn chair at Walmart to enable this activity. But do wander off from your campsite at some point and check out the Festival: bands will be playing throughout the day on Saturday and Sunday, there will be local artisan tents and helicopter tours (only $99 – if I weren’t terrified of helicopters I’d say this sounds like a steal), there’s an art bar where you can paint and drink wine (this is more my speed), and you can rent paddle boards and kayaks anytime outside of race swim windows. And yes, beer and wine will be flowing all weekend long.

As if all that weren’t enough, there is a 5k run at the Redonda Vista campground on Saturday night (think: pre- or post-race shake out run) that ends with an 80’s dance party, sponsored by Clif Bar. Seriously: AN 80’S DANCE PARTY. I mean, I thought I was excited about the Wildflower Experience when I signed up – now I don’t even care about the race. I just want to go to the 80’s dance party.

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More info about the races (long and short course tri’s – both on-road and off-road, 10k, 5k, trail run, and SUP races) HERE and registration HERE.

Make a reservation for camping or a Bell Tent HERE.

Check out the full weekend schedule HERE.

303Radio Talks with Tim Hola before Ironman 70.3 World Championships

303Triathlon recently caught up with Tim Hola before he headed to Chattanooga Tennessee for this past weekend’s Ironman 70.3 World Championship.

Tim lives in Highlands Ranch with his wife Nicole and two children, Connor and Spencer. Triathlon has been in the Hola family since his dad, Ken Hola, introduced Tim to it at age 20. Tim has always been competitive and he believes the height of one’s achievement is a product of the height of one’s goals. Tim talked about his goals for this season and the results that led to a USAT National Championship and qualifying for both the 70.3 and Ironman World Championships.

Tim cranked out a 4:38:23 finish at 70.3 World Championship in Chattanooga this weekend and will now set his sights on Kona in mid-October. This will be Tim’s 16th Ironman on the big island of Hawaii, showing he has the formula for training and competing at the highest level, while balancing work and family.

Tim competes at near-pro level, yet he is a working age-grouper facing the responsibilities and prioritization challenges of those who do triathlon for the passion and not for the paycheck. He gives us insights into how balancing his passion for triathlon with other priorities of a working age grouper and father. When it comes to balance, Tim describes the importance of “knowing your priorities, meeting your partner’s needs and communicating”.

Check out the complete interview.

Butterfield’s Orderly Results: Tyler Scores Another Step Up At Ironman 70.3 Worlds

September 12, 2017 – Professional triathlete Tyler Butterfield logged another world-class performance to score seventh place at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship on Sunday in Chattanooga, Tennessee, his best 70.3 World Championship finish to date. The result marked Butterfield’s steady progression through the top ten at the championship event, having finished ninth in 2013,, eighth in 2015, and now seventh in 2017, and bodes well for his fitness in the final five-week lead into the Ironman World Championship on October 14th in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. His corresponding Kona finishes in those years were his best to date—seventh in 2013 and fifth in 2015—showing a pattern of success when tackling the 70.3 Championship prior to the Ironman World Championship, his primary focus for several years now.

Butterfield clocked 25:20 in the 1.2-mile swim, emerging with the main group of men containing all the key contenders outside of swim leaders Ben Kanute, the eventual second- place finisher, and Javier Gomez, prolific triathlon champion and silver medalist at the Olympic Games, who went on to win.

Ten men—including Butterfield and Ironman world record holder Tim Don—rode in the chase pack, with hard-charging Sebastian Kienle, a two-time victor at the race, coming from behind. Entering T2, Butterfield was in third; within 30 seconds a flurry of six other top rivals flew in and out of transition and quickly sorted themselves out on the road ahead, with Butterfield now running in sixth. Gomez, known for his spectacular run speed, made quick work from further back in the field to knock off every forward challenger and claim the world title. Butterfield held steady and strong, and ultimately crossed the line in seventh with a 1:17:32 half marathon and 3:56:22 finish time.

“I wasn’t able to put in my usual attacks on the bike. It was hard enough just being there! Racing at this level gets more and more competitive every year. I looked around and everyone in the group was a world title holder, world record holder, or at least someone who has won a lot of races. You can’t just get away from these guys whenever you like,” said Butterfield.

“I also wanted to wait and test my run,” he continued. “I wanted to really get a feel for my run fitness in advance of Kona—something you can’t fully gauge outside of a race environment. I haven’t had the opportunity to get in the run training I’d like for a number of years—partly because of injury, but now, looking back, also because of where we lived.”

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Since the family’s move from their mountain home to a farm in rural Boulder County, Butterfield has been able to run straight out the door, rather than spend time driving to and from town. Living at a lower altitude (5,600 feet, as opposed to 7,400 feet) has also allowed him to cope with a higher workload. Additionally, he has found that the convenience of being able to go home between sessions has helped his recovery.

“I was a little disappointed with my run, considering the training I’ve had. It was solid, but nothing special. Really, I should be running only a little slower than that for an entire marathon if I want to be in the mix in Kona,” said Butterfield, who averaged 5:55 minute miles in Sunday’s race. “I’m not sure if I was still a little tired from the training. I certainly gave this race the respect it deserves and came in tapered, but I think I may have carried in a bit too much long-term fatigue. I’m hoping I can get in the remaining training I need in the next five weeks, as well as shake some of the residual tiredness from my Kona overload. It’s kind of hard to do both at once—get fitter and fresher—but I’ll try.”

Butterfield indeed appears to be on track for another impressive race on the Big Island, as evidenced by a steady pattern of improving results. His 2017 regular season performances started with fourth at Ironman 70.3 Dubai, then third at the Ironman North American Championship, followed by second at Ironman 70.3 Monterrey, and finally a win at Ironman 70.3 Raleigh. This pattern of improvement also shows in his Ironman 70.3 World Championship progression—ninth in 2013, eighth in 2015, and seventh in 2017—and in his Kona performances, where he finished seventh in 2013 and fifth in 2015.

“I guess I like to keep my results orderly,” joked Butterfield. “In all seriousness, I do like the steady progress upward. It’s rewarding to see the results of all the hard work, as my entire family sacrifices year-round to help me be the best I can be. Hopefully with the focused training I’ve had so far and the time remaining, I can continue to improve all the way into Kona.”

Butterfield now heads back home to Colorado for his final Kona training block, with five short weeks remaining until the Ironman World Championship.


90 countries, regions and territories represented in Chattanooga, Tennessee for 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship, taking place on Sept. 9 and 10.

TAMPA, Fla. (Sept. 1, 2017) — Approximately 4,500 of the world’s top athletes will head to the “Scenic City” on September 9 and 10 to compete in the 2017 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship. The event returns to U.S. soil for the first time in four years, and also marks the first time that the event will take place over two days. IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holding company, has produced this world-class event since 2006, with global rotation beginning in 2014.

“With its dramatic backdrop, striking riverfront and fast swim course through the Tennessee River, Chattanooga is well-equipped to play host to the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship this September,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for IRONMAN. “This is a historic year for this event with the largest athlete field ever for any IRONMAN 70.3 event, while also creating a first with a two-day IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship allowing for focus of the female race on Saturday and male race on Sunday. We look forward to providing our athletes with an exceptional race experience in this great host location.”

With athletes hailing from 90 countries, regions and territories, North America leads the way with 52 percent of the athletes registered to race in the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship. Following North America, Europe accounts for 25 percent, while Asia-Pacific accounts for 12 percent of the field.

The United States of America is the most represented nation with 1,853 registered competitors, followed by Canada (264), Australia (232) and the United Kingdom (213). Other athletes from countries as far as Indonesia, Kazakhstan and Serbia are traveling around the globe for their shot at the title.

This year, returning age group champions from the 2016 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship on the women’s side include Janine Willis (CAN), Katrine Amtkjaer Nielsen (DNK), Lesley Tuggle (USA) and Raeleigh Harris (AUS). On the men’s side, returning age group champions include Brian Boyle (NZL), Harry Barnes (CAN), Rodolphe Von Berg (BEL) and Ryan Giuliano (USA).

With breathtaking scenery, Chattanooga is a supreme location for a fall sporting event. The 2017 field of athletes will tackle a 1.2-mile (1.9 km) ocean swim in the Tennessee River, followed by a 56-mile (90 km) bicycle ride through Lookout Mountain and into downtown Chattanooga, capped with a 13.1-mile (21 km) run through Downtown Chattanooga along the Tennessee Riverwalk and Riverfront Parkway, finishing at Ross’s landing – all of which must be completed before an eight-and-a-half-hour cutoff time.

In order to qualify for the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship, more than 185,000 age-group athletes competed to earn slots at over 100 IRONMAN 70.3 events held worldwide.

Top triathletes descend on Chattanooga for IRONMAN 70.3 Worlds

CHATTANOOGA/TAMPA (Aug. 16, 2017) – Triathlon’s top talent will come together in Chattanooga, Tennessee for the 2017 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship taking place on September 9 and 10. Boasting one of the most competitive professional fields in the sport, the event will make history in the Southeastern U.S. this September with the women’s field racing on Saturday and the men’s field racing on Sunday.

“The professional field set to compete is unquestionably one of the deepest in recent history,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for IRONMAN. “Chattanooga will no doubt be an excellent host to the best talent from around the world as they converge on the Scenic City next month. We are all extremely excited to debut this new two-day format allowing for both women and men to have their day of competition and celebration.”

Returning to the lineup to defend her title will be 2016 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion Holly Lawrence (GBR). With victories already this year at the IRONMAN 70.3 North American Pro Championship, St. George, IRONMAN 70.3 Oceanside, IRONMAN 70.3 Santa Rosa, and Subaru IRONMAN 70.3 Mont-Tremblant, Lawrence’s flawless season has proven that she will yet again be tough competition in an impressive professional field.

The 2014 and 2015 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion and defending IRONMAN World Champion, Daniela Ryf (CHE) will be looking to add a third IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship title in four years. Also vying for the title will be 2011 and 2013 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship winner and last year’s IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship runner-up Melissa Hauschildt (AUS). Ryf and Hauschildt both have an opportunity to become the first triathletes to win three IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship titles and will push the pace for the rest of the field.

Challenging these world champions is a group of talented women looking to break through, led by likes of Jeanni Seymour, Laura Philipp and Heather Wurtele, who has been on the podium at the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship the past three years.

Below is the pro women’s start list for the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship:

1 Lawrence Holly GBR (United Kingdom)
2 Luxford Annabel AUS (Australia)
3 Philipp Laura DEU (Germany)
4 Seymour Jeanni ZAF (South Africa)
5 Crowley Sarah AUS (Australia)
6 Hauschildt Melissa AUS (Australia)
7 Salthouse Ellie AUS (Australia)
8 Pallant Emma GBR (United Kingdom)
9 Wurtele Heather CAN (Canada)
10 Ryf Daniela CHE (Switzerland)
12 Smith Lesley USA (United States of America)
14 Chura Haley USA (United States of America)
15 Kaye Alicia USA (United States of America)
16 Watkinson Amelia NZL (New Zealand)
17 Spieldenner Jennifer USA (United States of America)
18 Brandon Lauren USA (United States of America)
19 Frederiksen Helle DNK (Denmark)
20 Tisseyre Magali CAN (Canada)
21 Huetthaler Lisa AUT (Austria)
22 Seymour Natalie GBR (United Kingdom)
23 Huse Sue CAN (Canada)
24 Morrison Kimberley GBR (United Kingdom)
25 Riveros Barbara CHL (Chile)
26 Roy Stephanie CAN (Canada)
27 Vaquera Judith ESP (Spain)
28 Eberhardt Anna HUN (Hungary)
29 Jerzyk Agnieszka POL (Poland)
30 Riesler Diana DEU (Germany)
32 Wassner Laurel USA (United States of America)
33 Brennan Morrey Ruth USA (United States of America)
34 True Sarah USA (United States of America)
35 Linnell Allison USA (United States of America)
36 Hector Alice GBR (United Kingdom)
37 Tastets Pamela CHL (Chile)
38 Jackson Heather USA (United States of America)
39 Schulz Jenny DEU (Germany)
41 Czesnik Maria POL (Poland)
42 Juhart Monica AUS (Australia)
43 Pomeroy Robin USA (United States of America)
44 Roberts Lisa USA (United States of America)
45 Palacio Balena Romina ARG (Argentina)
46 Lester Sarah AUS (Australia)
47 Joyce Rachel GBR (United Kingdom)
48 Jahn Kirsty CAN (Canada)
49 Furriela Carolina BRA (Brazil)
50 Annett Jen CAN (Canada)
51 Stienen Astrid DEU (Germany)
52 Jalowi Annett DEU (Germany)
53 Cravo De Azevedo Luiza BRA (Brazil)
54 Belanger Valerie CAN (Canada)
55 Wendorff Amanda USA (United States of America)
56 Komander Ewa POL (Poland)
57 Drewett Hannah GBR (United Kingdom)
58 Naeth Angela CAN (Canada)

On the men’s side, an equally determined group will seek to win this year’s title with 2016 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion Tim Reed (AUS) returning to defend his title. Sebastian Kienle (DEU), who was the 2012 and 2013 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion and 2014 IRONMAN World Champion, will be looking to become the first man to win three IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship titles. This year’s world championship also sees the return of 2014 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion and 2015 IRONMAN 70.3 runner up, Javier Gomez to the start line after an accident in 2016 sidelined his goals of an Olympic medal in Rio. With a victory in his only IRONMAN 70.3 event this year plus a win and top placings on the WTS circuit, he will bring some top-end speed to the field. Unfortunately, a nagging hip injury and season ending surgery has put the much anticipated debut of two-time Olympic gold medalist Alistair Brownlee on hold for this year.

Below is the pro men’s start list for the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship:

1 Reed Tim AUS (Australia)
2 Appleton Sam AUS (Australia)
4 Don Tim GBR (United Kingdom)
5 Kienle Sebastian DEU (Germany)
7 Dreitz Andreas DEU (Germany)
8 Butterfield Tyler BMU (Bermuda)
9 Mendez Cruz Mauricio MEX (Mexico)
10 Von Berg Rodolphe USA (United States of America)
11 Raelert Michael DEU (Germany)
12 Gomez Javier ESP (Spain)
14 Clavel Maurice DEU (Germany)
15 Reid Taylor CAN (Canada)
16 Costes Antony FRA (France)
17 Collington Kevin USA (United States of America)
18 Hanson Matt USA (United States of America)
20 Gambles Joe AUS (Australia)
21 Tutukin Ivan RUS (Russian Federation)
23 O’Donnell Tim USA (United States of America)
24 De Elias Mario ARG (Argentina)
25 Chevrot Denis FRA (France)
26 Thomas Jesse USA (United States of America)
27 Quinchara Forero Carlos Javier COL (Colombia)
29 Heemeryck Pieter BEL (Belgium)
30 McMahon Brent CAN (Canada)
32 Laundry Jackson CAN (Canada)
33 Jarrige Yvan FRA (France)
34 Chrabot Matt USA (United States of America)
35 Van de Wyngard Felipe CHL (Chile)
36 Weiss Michael AUT (Austria)
37 Cunnama James ZAF (South Africa)
38 Dirksmeier Patrick DEU (Germany)
39 Colucci Reinaldo BRA (Brazil)
41 Wiltshire Harry GBR (United Kingdom)
42 Scott Drew USA (United States of America)
43 Kalashnikov Ivan RUS (Russian Federation)
44 Leiferman Chris USA (United States of America)
45 Plese David SVN (Slovenia)
46 Jolicoeur Desroches Antoine CAN (Canada)
47 Kanute Ben USA (United States of America)
48 Amorelli Igor BRA (Brazil)
49 Cartmell Fraser GBR (United Kingdom)
50 Wurtele Trevor CAN (Canada)
51 Carrillo Avila Alan MEX (Mexico)
52 Watson Eric BHR (Bahrain)
53 Polizzi Alexander AUS (Australia)
54 Otstot Adam USA (United States of America)
55 Crawford Guy NZL (New Zealand)

The 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship triathlon will offer a $250,000 total professional prize purse which will be distributed to male and female first through tenth place finishers.

In addition to the competitive professional field, approximately 4,500 registered age-group athletes representing more than 90 countries, territories and regions from around the world are expected to compete at this year’s IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship.

How to Recover like a Pro

From Boulder Sports Clinic

As an athlete of any kind, we are always pushing the limits of our body. Workouts break us down. In order to reach the finish line of our next race we need our body to adapt to the stress of training.

Have you ever been sore after a workout? Of course! That soreness is a sign that you’ve successfully broken down muscle tissue during your activity that is required to become better, faster, and stronger.

We frequently read about the latest training recommendations in the world, which claim to shape you into a better athlete: training supplements, nutritional fads, ice baths, muscle rubs, compression garments, and stretching……


What is the optimal recovery routine? To answer that question we sat down with top American professional triathlete Justin Metzler.

In addition to year-round training, Justin raced twelve 70.3s, or half Ironman distance triathlons last year on five continents with multiple podium finishes. This level of consistent racing requires massive weekly hours of swimming, biking, and running with many of those days having multiple training sessions. In order to recover from one session enough to hit the next just as hard, he has dialed in the most effective recovery tools-and he is sharing his secrets with us.

How do you recover from a typical training session?

Immediately following a training session or race I have a recovery drink. Regardless of the type of session or which sport, any type of workout will break down muscle and deplete glycogen stores. My immediate goal is to replenish the glycogen and supply my body with the amino acids it needs to rebuild the muscle I just broke down. After trying a lot of different flavors and brands, I prefer First Endurance Ultragen. It has the optimal balance of carbohydrate to protein in addition to a number of essential vitamins and minerals to help rebuild for the next session. Not to mention, it tastes great!

When I can, I tend to structure the training to have enough down time in between the workouts to allow me to relax, put my feet up, and grab some food. In between sessions I am primarily focusing on foods high in protein and nutrient density. Some examples include lean meats, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables.

What is a typical routine after your training is completely done for the day?

After the training is done I try to relax, answer emails, talk with my nutrition and coaching clients, and make a healthful dinner with my girlfriend- fellow professional triathlete, Jeanni Seymour. Just like everyone else, our day-to-day is quite busy and we often are out training from dawn to dusk. But we always try to make dinner a time that we can cook together, eat together and catch up on the days activities. Once or twice a week, we have a glass of red wine to help relax!

Before bed, I always try to use my Normatec boots for somewhere between 30-60 minutes. On harder days I go for less time at a softer setting. On easier days I bump up the intensity and sit in them for a bit longer. The boots are a great tool to aid in recovery but I try not to disrupt my body’s natural recovery process.

I always have some form of protein before bed. Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, or whey protein are my ‘go-to’s. The protein helps give my body what it needs recover over night, the time when the majority of your recovery gains will be made. People often overlook the fact that your ability to improve is dictated by your ability to absorb training load. So recovery is equally important to any hard training session that you may do.

How much sleep do you get each night?

As I mentioned, sleep is a big priority for me. I have spent the money necessary to have a great mattress, sound machine, ear plugs, etc in order to try to get the most quality sleep I can every night. I aim to get 8-10 hours a night, and I don’t usually nap unless I fail to get my normal amount of sleep.

Do you have recovery days built into your training plan?

My training is structured to have some days of active recovery. On recovery days, I use the lighter workouts as a warm up for any foam rolling, stretching, or rehab exercises I may need to focus on. I also try to schedule chiropractic and massage appointments every week to help address any small issues before they become something I actually have to worry about.

Do you take any supplements?

The only supplements I take are fish oil (I like the KLEAN or Zone Labs brands) and a multivitamin (First Endurance multi-v is my favorite). As a professional who gets drug tested regularly, I watch what I consume carefully. I find that with a proper healthful diet, most people don’t need many supplements. Shoot for a minimum of four fruits and four vegetables every day.

What is the one piece of advice you would give to any runner or triathlete about recovery?

Nail your nutrition. You should have just as much importance placed on fueling correctly as you do building a training schedule. The worst thing to happen to any endurance athlete in a race is hitting the wall and having to slow down or get the dreaded DNF.

In every workout you use stored glycogen for fuel. If you deplete the glycogen stores you hit the wall. To fully come back from depleting your stores, it takes days or weeks. This means your next workouts suffer or you’re not able to complete them.

The key is to never let your glycogen stores get too low. Think of it like the fuel gage on your car. Try to never let it dip below 25-50% capacity.

I try to have a form of carbohydrates every 30 minutes during a workout. A gel, half a bar, banana, or sports drink, helps to make sure my “fuel tank” never falls below the level I am shooting for.

How does Boulder Sports Chiropractic help you?

It is so important to stay on top of injury risk. My body is my livelihood and if I’m injured, I can’t race! Getting weekly treatments to focus on any tightness I may have from shoulder pain to calf tightness keeps me from having any injury set backs. I love the Active Release Technique and dry needling. In addition to massage and rehab; chiropractic care and the modalities Boulder Sports Chiropractic rely on are a critical part to my body work protocol.

More about Justin…

In addition to professional triathlon, Justin has a degree in human physiology and nutrition. He has a unique set of skills developed through hours in the classroom paired with 10 years of multisport experience. When he is not training, he helps athletes like you build customized nutrition plans to address any weakness in training, racing or general body composition.

Services Justin offers: one-on-one monthly coaching, race specific training plans, race nutrition strategies, race weight planning, daily nutrition strategies for optimal body composition and general nutrition guidelines.

If you feel like you could benefit from building a proper nutrition plan for training/racing, or to learn more about the services that Justin offers, contact him at:

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At Boulder Sports Chiropractic, we use movement screens to biomechanically evaluate how your whole body is moving and how it works together.We use the best techniques to address your source of pain and dysfunction including Active Release Technique, Graston, and Dry Needling.

We send every patient home with the rehab exercises or stretches to give you the tools to fix the problem, not just treat the symptoms! Contact us today to schedule your appointment.

2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship Triathlon Awarded to Nice, France

TAMPA/NICE (April 20, 2017) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, announced today that the right to host the 2019 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship triathlon has been awarded to Nice, France. The event will take place on Saturday, September 7 and Sunday, September 8, 2019, and will be the first time IRONMAN holds a world championship event in France. In addition, IRONMAN announced today that a brand new IRONMAN 70.3 event will be held in Nice on September 16, 2018 leading to the world championship event a year later; this qualifying event will then continue in 2020 as part of the IRONMAN 70.3 European Tour.

As the capital of the Alpes-Maritimes on the French Riviera in the southeast coast of France, Nice first hosted an IRONMAN® event in 2005 and since then has been one of the most popular locations on the IRONMAN race circuit. The world championship is the pinnacle event in the IRONMAN 70.3 Series, and with the event’s global rotation that began in 2014, it showcases the best venues IRONMAN has to offer around the world.

“The successful growth of the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship since its global rotation began in 2014 can be attributed in large part to Diana Bertsch, the world championship team she established, the host cities, and the collective determination to create an event that captures the hearts and minds of our athletes,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for IRONMAN. “With the origins of the popular Nice triathlon which set the stage in the region, this is the next evolution of this extraordinary event and brings Europe back to the forefront, with a history of culture, sport and scenery that is the perfect mix for IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship athletes.”

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship event expects to attract more than 5,000 athletes from over 100 global qualifying events in locations such as Austria, Australia, China, Germany, Spain, South Africa, Sweden and the Americas.

With its mix of old-world opulence, year-round sunshine and stunning seaside location, Nice is the unofficial capital of the Côte d’Azur and the fifth-largest city in France. A magnet for beachgoers and culture-seekers since the 19th century, this coastal city has fabulous markets, an enticing old town, glorious architecture and a wealth of high-end restaurants. With one of the largest international airports in France located just minutes away from the city, Nice is easily accessible and welcomes over five million visitors every year as one of the most famous tourist destinations in the world. Beyond the beauty of the area, Nice also offers a rich culture built by some of the greatest painters, writers and musicians the world has known. With outstanding cuisine and culture, Nice embodies all the benefits of a historic coastal city. If you really want to soak up the Riviera vibe, there’s no better place.

“It is with great pride that our city will host this international competition for the first time in France, with a sport that is particularly well established in Nice. Since 1982, our city has organized world-renowned triathlon events, held in an exceptional setting with a truly unique course,” said Christian Estrosi, President Region Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur. “This will undoubtedly be a momentous occasion for all triathlon enthusiasts and I welcome everyone to enjoy the beauty of our city. Nice is now recognized as a great host city for major events of international recognition. This dedication to staging events is an essential asset for the development of economic activity. Each year, IRONMAN brings € 4 million in economic revenue, and I am convinced that this new event will once again strengthen our attractiveness as a host city and boost our local economy.”

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is part of a week-long festival that will include a range of lifestyle events for the community and visitors to enjoy.

“With IRONMAN France, our French team lead by Yves Cordier has created one of the best IRONMAN events in the world, as voted by athletes in the IRONMAN Athletes’ Choice Awards. It is only fitting that the 2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship has been awarded to Nice and the Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur region,” said Hans-Peter Zurbrügg, Managing Director for IRONMAN Europe, Middle East and Africa. “Both the city and region offer easy access, a stunning backdrop for the event, and exceptional tourism destination for friends and family. We look forward to welcoming athletes from all over the world to this amazing location.”

The event will incorporate a swim in the pristine waters of the Mediterranean Sea, a bike course that passes through villages and mountains, and a run course along Nice’s historic Promenade des Anglais waterfront.

“Ever since competing as a professional athlete in the 1989 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawai’i, it has been my dream to bring a world championship event to the city and region I call home; that dream is now becoming a reality,” said Yves Cordier, Managing Director, IRONMAN France. “I would like to extend my gratitude to the City of Nice and the Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur for their loyalty and trust in our team. We are ready to welcome the world to Nice!”

Prior to the 2019 edition taking place in Nice, the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is taking place on September 9 and 10, 2017 in Chattanooga, Tennessee; and the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship will travel to Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa on September 1 and September 2, 2018.

For more information about the event, please visit