Tri Coach Tuesday: D3 Coach and Athlete Mike Ricci’s BPT Recap

by Mike Ricci, Head Coach and Founder, D3 Multisport

 

 

The BIG EVENT of the summer was here for the Ricci Family. It was one of THE most important events on the Ricci calendar. 1:20 pm on Sunday we were going to see “Cars 3” There was no taper for this and I had to race the Boulder Peak beforehand. And that meant getting the car packed up at the Res, unpacked at home, showered and to the theater in time. I know you’ll be glad to know we made it with time to spare. Now, onto the 2nd important event of July 9th.

 

 

I first raced Boulder Peak in 1996 and then raced it every year until 2001. Looking back historically I’ve raced it 7 times, including this weekend. I’ve always loved the challenge of Olde Stage, the steep competition and the fact that it’s a strength course. The swim is usually choppy, the run up the beach takes some strength (in the old days we used to run up the big hill on the North side of the Res – a good 90” run from swim exit to transition), you have Olde Stage on the bike and most of the run is on gravel with some small rollers. There’s nowhere to hide on this course – you are either fit or you’re not. Unfortunately for me, going into this race, I’m was somewhere in between.

 

In 1999, the race was an Ironman Qualifier and I was pumped to have a KQ in my backyard. The competition was tough that year! I swam around 23 minutes, biked 1:09 and ran under 39 minutes, yet I was still 14th in my AG, even though I went 2:14. That was my fastest time as it was the only time I picked the Peak as my A race. For historical perspective, this year, a 2:14 gets you second in the 30-34. In 1999, the 1st slot in my AG went to a guy who went 2:01 or in that range.

 

Although this wasn’t an A race for me, I was pretty happy to be racing the Peak again, the first time since 2009 (2:24 and 11th AG). The fact that Barry Siff was back and Olde Stage was part of the bike course played a big part in my decision. Besides my 14th AG in 1999, I’ve had a few 11th and 12th places along the way, but I’ve never cracked the top 10 in my AG. The competition is always tough and it’s not a course that suits my style of racing, but I enjoy the challenge anyway. I’ve always been a bit of a 2nd half racer, usually peaking late in the season for an out of town race.

 

 

Up until a few weeks ago, I had no intention of racing the Peak in 2017, but I wanted to challenge myself and I knew I would train hard knowing this is a race that is serious and like I said above, there’s nowhere to hide out there.

Since I haven’t really trained since 2011, my ‘ability to suffer’ is really my limiter. So, I set out to do that these last few weeks with some shorter races and putting hard workouts back to back. I’ve seen a nice progression and I had a few small goals for the Peak.

1) Was to break 2:30 for the entire race.

2) Be top 10 in the AG

3) Run a strong race in the 7:20 range off the bike

While self-coaching, I’m usually able to look at things clearly and I have plenty of good coaches and resources to ask if I get stuck on a problem.

The one part I usually get wrong is doing too much, too close to a race. Take Friday as an example:

Swim: 4×200 descend and I hit my best swim times in 4 years. Probably a mistake.

Run: 8×400 at 5k pace. Felt easy and gave me some confidence that things are trending correctly.

Bike: Olde Stage, Jamestown, and then back side of Lee Hill – ended up riding almost 3 hours, but the legs felt good, so why not?

On Saturday night as I was going up the stairs in my house, I realized my legs were pretty empty – but that’s ok! I kept telling myself that this season isn’t about the Boulder Peak, and it’s not.

So, the only real challenge that I find to being self coached is knowing when to say ‘enough’. I could fill Training Peaks with 6 hour training days every day and as much as I’d like to bounce back day after day, it’s not going to happen. Not with 2 small kids and a business to manage. So, I do what I know works, and constantly work on the weaknesses as I see them. For me, the joy is in doing workouts I enjoy – hard short swim workouts – 100s, 200s etc: hard bike workouts with high power and burning legs, and running decent speed sessions where I see progress each week. Otherwise, I lose focus, do the same workouts over and over and end up bored and sitting on my toukas vs training.

The Race:

I got there early, warmed up and the legs felt tired, but that was to be expected. Everything was smooth and to be honest without as much pomp and circumstance, the race lacked some excitement and the ‘edge’ was missing. I was ready to roll though and fully cafienated.

I started at the front of the swim and knowing that I needed everything I had for the run, I swam one speed the entire way and that was ‘easy to moderate’. I had clean water the entire way, the buoys were visible to me, and I stood up at about 24:10. That was more than I was hoping for and I was off to a great start. I was 6th out of the swim.

Dave Sheanin with PJ Snyder, AiT

I eased into the bike and felt strong going out Jay and onto 36. The climb was solid and I matched my best time from my repeats these past few weeks and all was going according to plan. The canyon was as fast as always, Nelson was awesome, and the rollers on 63rd, well they chewed me up a bit! If I had listened to one wise soul, Dave, I would have saved some of my energy going up Olde Stage. But I’m too stubborn for that. I rode steady along 63rd hoping to minimize any damage, and whenever I tried to lift the effort, I could feel my legs say ‘no thanks’. As much as I would like to say this is a fitness issues, it’s not. It was more of a recovery issue. Had I done my Friday workout on Wednesday or Thursday I think I would have felt different. But the circumstances are what they are and I had to get ready mentally for the bike. I had a few guys in my AG blow by me on the bike, but only a couple and I wasn’t about to chase anyone down. I ended up biking my slowest time and off the bike in 7th in my AG. I only lost 1 place, when it felt like I lost 5. For those keeping track at home, watts were in the HIM range – 83% of FTP. Not stellar by any means. Still doing ok mentally and ready to move up on the run.

I took my time in T2 and put on socks. I race with orthotics now and if I race without socks, I get nasty blisters so better to be safe than sorry! I took it out way too fast, after telling myself not to all week. I was hurting 800m in and I knew I was in for a tough run. I only had one gear and just ran easy to moderate – I wasn’t cramping or having nutrition issues, but I was just cooked. Moving forward was easy, but moving faster wasn’t happening. It was a slow, easy run, but just in the middle of a race. Sometimes, that happens! I saw Jim Hallberg coming in strong, 2nd in the Elite wave, as well as Julian Wheating who is part of our D3 Elite Team. Very happy to report one of my athletes, Greg Lindquist, rocked the race as well coming in 4th Elite. Just as a side note, Jim, Dore Berens, and Casey Fleming all hit the podium too – and they are part of our Elite Team. Good to see the focused training paying off! D3 Coach Dave did race with Athletes in Tandem, Coach Simon hit the podium, and Coach Alison was 3rd as well. Of course, I’m biased, but I think we have the best group of coaches in the business – they can walk the walk and talk the talk. And I don’t mean by just being quick on race day but their athletes all improve, race to race, season to season.

 

Back to the run: I had quite a few people come around me on the run, and that’s something I’m not used to, but when there’s nothing you can do about it – you just keep plodding along. I came into the finish zone and ran in with my 9 year old Hope who was kind enough to slow down for me and we finished together and jumped into the slip and slide. That was awesome. My run time was close to 50 minutes and if you told me I’d run that slow pre-race, I would have laughed, but on second thought, maybe I wouldn’t have! You reap what you sow and since I’m in that in between place with my fitness, I can accept it. It’s up to me and no one else to change it.

 

I ended up at 2:34 and change, my slowest BPT, and of course I missed the top 10 by 30 seconds. I remember being passed along the dam before you hit the Marina and I had one of those moments where I said “Dude we are in 19th and 20th place, so who cares” Well, I guess I care because I’ll be back as a 50 year old next season, and I’ll be on a mission to get even further into the top 10.

The Boulder Peak is back baby and I am for the time being as well!

Legendary pro triathlete & coach Siri Lindley says Boulder Peak is “best of the best”

Siri Lindley – Kona, 2014 (Photo: Bill Plock, 303Triathlon)

303Radio hosts Rich Soares and Bill Plock had the opportunity to interview legendary pro triathlete and coach Siri Lindley yesterday and talk about her passion for the Boulder Peak race. Siri calls the Boulder Peak Tri the “best of the best” compared to all other races – worldwide.

“Truly, of all the iconic races that I’ve been to around the world, like Escape from Alcatraz, Wildflower, Lake Geneva in Switzerland… I seriously think the Boulder Peak triathlon is the best of the best as far as the energy, the atmosphere, the passion that people have in this area for the sport, and for getting out there and pushing their limits…”

Take a listen to this teaser!

And be sure to tune in tomorrow when the full hour interview with Siri Lindley is being released – she discusses her Colorado roots, her days as a pro triathlete, coaching Mirinda “Rinny” Carfrae, her Sirius Athletes, and her new Believe Ranch & Rescue charity.

Also, don’t miss hearing Siri speak at the “Get Psyched for the Peak” party at Colorado Multisport Wednesday night, along with 5430 founder Barry Siff, pro triathlete Cameron Dye, Skirt Sports owner Nicole Deboom, and Mental Skills coach Will Murray.

Weekend Preview: Summer Is Here

Triathlon Events

Thursday June 22nd

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Vixxen Racing OWS Clinic

Boulder Reservoir


Stroke & Stride

Boulder Reservoir


Friday June 23rd

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Saturday June 24th

 

TriBella Women’s Triathlon

Cherry Creek Reservoir


Solstice Swim

Union Reservoir


Alison Dunlap Level II MTB Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Lake to Lake Triathlon

Loveland


Tri the Boat – Sprint & Oly

Stagecoach Reservoir, Steamboat Springs


Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Sunday June 25th

 

South Suburban Indoor TRYathlon

Centennial


Boulder Sunrise Triathlon-Duathlon-Run

Boulder Reservoir


Tri the Boat – Half

Stagecoach Reservoir, Steamboat Springs


Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Alison Dunlap Level II MTB Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


USAT Paratriathlon National Championships

Kenosha, Wi



Cycling Events

Thursday June 22nd

 

BVV Track Night

Erie


Friday June 23rd

 

Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


Chainless World Championships

Crested Butte


Saturday June 24th

 

2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies

The inaugural 2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies will bring seven timed and ranked stages to Colorado June 24-30. In addition to start and finish venues of Boulder and Colorado Springs, the event will visit Winter Park, Avon, Snowmass Village and Crested Butte Organisers expect the 600-rider peloton to sell-out, but a limited number of discounted


Colorado Bike MS

Ft. Collins


Alison Dunlap MTB Level II Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Prestige Imports Snowmass Loop MTB Fondo

Snowmass


Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


WP Epic Single Track: Super Loop

Winter Park


Pedaling 4 Parkinson’s

Lone Tree


Fat Tire 40

Crested Butte


4SOH

Ft. Collins


Art by Bike Tours of Loveland

Loveland


USA Pro Road & TT National Championships


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 MTB Skills Clinic

Boulder


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1.5 MTB Skills Clinic

Erie


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 MTB Skills Clinic

Boulder


Community Cycles Membership Party

Boulder


Sunday June 25th

 

2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies

The inaugural 2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies will bring seven timed and ranked stages to Colorado June 24-30. In addition to start and finish venues of Boulder and Colorado Springs, the event will visit Winter Park, Avon, Snowmass Village and Crested Butte Organisers expect the 600-rider peloton to sell-out, but a limited number of discounted


Parker Mainstreet Criterium

Parker


SMC – Breck Mtn Enduro

Breckenridge


Colorado Bike MS

Ft. Collins


Alison Dunlap MTB Level II Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


SOH

Ft. Collins


Avista Women’s Weekly Ride

Louisville


USA Pro Road & TT National Championships

Weekend Preview: Happy Father’s Day

Triathlon Events

Saturday June 17th

 

XTERRA Lory – SOLD OUT

Ft. Collins

 

One of the best beginner XTERRA races around.  Mark your calendar for next year’s event.  It sells out fast!


Lookout Mountain Triathlon

Golden


Leadville Trail Marathon & Heavy Half

Leadville


2017 National Duathlon Championships

Bend, Oregon


Sunday June 18th

 

Mt. Evans Ascent

Idaho Springs


2017 National Duathlon Championships

Bend, Oregon



 

Cycling Events

Saturday June 17th

 

Mountain Top Experience Ride

Florissant, Teller County, Co


Colorado Death Ride

Durango


Denver Century Ride

Stapleton


Bailey HUNDO

Bailey


John Stenner Memorial Colorado TT Championships

Keensburg


Kona Bike Demo

Boulder


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 Mtb Skills Clinic 

Boulder


Lee Likes Bikes Level 2 Mtb Skills Clinic 

Boulder


G’Knight Ride

Longmont


Sunday June 18th

 

Bicycle Tour of Colorado

Pagosa Springs


Mt Evans Ascent

Idaho Springs


Guanella Pass Hill Climb

Georgetown


FIBArk MTB Race

Salida


Day in the Dirt

Boulder


Avista Women’s Weekly Ride

Louisville


Kona Demo Day

Boulder

 

Follow 303Triathlon this Weekend

IRONMAN Boulder week is so fun!

We love the community that shines in our home town this week.  Be sure to follow us for all the action through the weekend.  The 303 staff and ambassadors will be every where all weekend starting at yesterday’s events, today’s athlete check in and pro panel, UPR, Opening Ceremonies, race day excitement, awards and Kona slots on Monday.

 

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @303Triathlon

 

Here’s a quick look at Thursday’s activities.

 

Rinny, Mike Reilly and Kristine Reinhardt-Pence at the IRONMAN Foundation and Paradox Sports in beautiful Eldorado Canyon State Park.

 

IRONMAN staff love their jobs!

 

 

 

At this year’s IRONMAN Boulder, Colorado athletes not only represent our great state to the rest of the triathlon world, but are included in IRONMAN’s Team Colorado, with special swim caps and 303 adorned race bibs for easy spotting by media and photographers… thanks to all the IMBoulder volunteers who help make this happen, along with uber race director Tim Brosious and of course Dave Christen!

 

 

Thursday Stroke & Stride is never uneventful!

 

 

Pease brothers, tandem team racing Sunday, at Big Ring Cycles

 

And every one loves a good story time, especially when Mike Reilly, the Voice of IRONMAN, is telling the stories.

 

2018 IRONMAN Boulder Registration News

From IRONMAN

We wanted to make you aware of some exciting changes to the registration process for 2018 IRONMAN Boulder. IRONMAN athletes are known for their dedication to and passion for the sport, we have heard your requests and are happy to announce the following programs based on that feedback.

General registration for 2018 IRONMAN Boulder will open on Monday, June 26, 2017,  at noon, Eastern time. We have made several changes to the registration options for 2018 that we wanted you to be aware of prior to the registration open date. Additional enhancements for the 2018 race include:

  • Introduction of a Deferral Program
  • Introduction of a Payment Plan Option
  • Inventory-based Pricing

Deferral Program: We want you to commit early to your 2018 race and we’ll commit right along with you. Athletes who register within the first 90 days of general entries becoming available are eligible to defer their entry into the next year’s event at no cost. We know that training can be tough and life happens, that’s why we’re offering the deferral option to athletes who register early. All requests will be honored until 45 days out from the original event date regardless of the reason for deferral.

Payment Plan Option: This is something athletes have been asking for and we’re responding. Athletes who register within the first 90 days of general entries becoming available will have the option to pay via a three-part payment plan. Athletes opting for the payment plan may also utilize the deferral option listed above once all three payments have been completed.

Inventory-based Pricing: IRONMAN is offering inventory-based pricing for 2018 events with selected quantities of slots being offered at prices significantly lower than prior years.

For more information visit the IRONMAN Boulder site.

Colorados McCurdy Wins USA Triathlon Off-Road National Championships

Twenty age-group national champions crowned in Arkadelphia, Arkansas

ARKADELPHIA, Ark. – Deanna McCurdy (Littleton, Colo.) and Dane Baldini (Bentonville, Ark.) raced their way to overall titles on Sunday at the USA Triathlon Off-Road National Championships, held at DeGray Lake and Iron Mountain in conjunction with XTERRA Gator Terra.

The course covered a 1500-meter swim, 32-kilometer mountain bike and 10-kilometer trail run. Athletes battled heavy rain and muddy conditions, racing over deep woods single-track featuring steep climbs and descents, large banked turns and more.

McCurdy was the top finisher for the women, clocking in at 3 hours, 5 minutes, 22 seconds to claim the overall win and the women’s 40-44 age-group title. She crossed the line more than 10 minutes ahead of Courtney Kaup (Richmond, Vt.), who placed second overall in 3:16:00 and successfully defended her women’s 35-39 title. Jane Zeigler (Tulsa, Okla.) rounded out the overall podium in third with a time of 3:18:04.

“It was so much fun. Running and biking upstream made for an exciting day,” McCurdy said. “The bike was a blast, it was a roller coaster out there. In Colorado we’re used to climbing for miles and miles, but here it was fast, it was flowy. The run course was fun, splashing through puddles. You just had to be a kid. If you think about how much it hurts and how tired you are, your race is over. But if you just play, it’s an adventure.”

Baldini had the fastest time of the day, with a final time of 2:49:34. In addition to the overall title, he also claimed the top spot in the men’s 30-34 age group. Baldini finished nearly four minutes ahead of runner-up Ryan Terry (West Sacramento, Calif.), who took the men’s 35-39 title in 2:53:33. Marcus Barton (Waxhaw, N.C.) was third in 2:55:30, successfully defending his men’s 45-49 title.

“I’ve been racing here seven years now, and this is the best venue around,” Baldini said. “The single track is fast, there’s a little bit of climbing which helps me out, and man, that run course was perfect for me. A little bit of road, a little bit of dirt. I got a nice lead and made sure second place couldn’t see me – that way they’d have to really pick it up.”

In total, twenty athletes captured age-group off-road national titles at DeGray Lake on Sunday. The top 18 finishers in each age group, rolling down to 25th place after applying the age-up rule, qualify to represent Team USA at the 2018 ITU Cross Triathlon (Off-Road) World Championships. The top-20 off-road triathletes per age group in the USA Triathlon off-road triathlon annual rankings as of Dec. 31, 2017, will also qualify for the World Champions

Mark on Monday: Pragmatic Triathlete…Triathlon on a Budget

By Mark Cathcart

Many people starting out in triathlon do so with a minimal investment, and get hooked on the sport only to find spending mounting up quickly.

For some, lightweight gear is essential, but for the majority, it will make little or no difference. My ZIPP race wheel set looks great, but over the first year I had them, averaged out, they made no difference to my 10-mile Time Trial (TT) speed. A friend bought a new bike, and it cost him about $300 per second on his TT time.

Looking good is half way to being good, isn’t it?

In this column, I’ll give you some tips on how you can save money, and be prepared to step-up a gear in triathlon performance.

Find a good club, team, or set of regular events to attend.
You can piggy back on swim sessions, open water swims, training days, time trials, group rides and much more. It’s often the first thing I do when I move. Try Boulder Tri Club, Rock Mountain Tri Club and many more. They are great launch pads to learn the tricks of the trade.

Clubs are always a great “marketplace” for used kit to borrow, bull and sell. You’d think that in the day of Craigslist, eBay and Facebook for sale groups you’d be able to find everything online? My experience is people ask too much online, and people often don’t think that anyone would buy their old saddle, a waterproof jacket that has some oil stains, or the pedals they swapped out last year. Clubs and teams are a great place to ask “do you know anyone that has…” – I gave away my Garmin 310XT last year this way.

Races
Small races remain much more affordable and better value, and they also often have good refund policies.

Starter Kits
Many triathlon and multisport shops offer starter or beginners sets. Entry level versions of everything you need, some even include running shoes, or a voucher to a partner shop. When buying a starter kit, have a budget and stick to it. You can always upgrade later, and the shop will price some items cheaper than you get them anywhere else.

Bikes
If you don’t have a lightweight road bike, don’t worry. Mountain bikes with slick tires and often as fast and easy to ride until you can average 14-15MPH over the whole course. Remember to keep low, tuck in your elbows
Inflate the tires as high as you are comfortable with, and lower than max pressure on the sidewall. For almost all first or second year triathletes, aluminum frames are good enough.

Aero Bars
Everyone gets aero bars. Check the wind tests – buying clip-on aero bars early on is also only a marginal benefit until you can average 18+ MPH over a race distance.

You are better off spending the money on a good road bike fit, make sure you tell the fitter you’ll be racing triathlon as there are very different requirements for fit between group rides and riding solo in a non-drafting triathlon. Again, keep low, tuck your elbows in.

Tires
Go for a good set of road tires, not lightweight racing tires. These will get you through 2-years of racing and training, and minimize punctures.

Wetsuits
See if you can find a “rent to buy” deal. You can rent the wetsuit for a race or a weekend, see how it works and often then put the rental price towards the purchase.

Also, wait until October. Shops tend to sell off their rental gear at the end of the season that only been used a few times, often at half price or less. Don’t but a shorty or sleeveless wetsuit just because they are cheap.

Running Shoes
Be careful when buying cheap running shoes. Make sure they’ll give the support you need. They’ll be a false economy if you get injured and running injuries tend to creep up on you.

When your shoes look worn, it’s already past when you should have changed them. They lose their support well before they are worn out. If you buy discount shoes, make sure you buy the type of shoe you need, don’t buy based on style and worse, color. If you don’t know the type of shoes you need, visit a specialist store like Flatirons Running, and buy shoes from them.

And yes, this is me at my first triathlon in 1999, We all make mistakes. Gloves, what was I thinking?

 

Mark Cathcart took up triathlon in the late 90’s to get fit for adventure racing, which to this day he has never done, and has since taken part in 170+ events. His pragmatic approach to training, racing, and life have lead in from being the Chairman of one of the bigger UK Triathlon clubs 15-years ago; British Triathlon volunteer of the year; a sometime race organizer; The organizer and ride leader for Austin Texas award winning Jack and Adams triathlon shop; doing sometime Sports Management for development and professional triathletes; he has attended all the Triathlon Business International, and Triathlon America conferences, where he usually asks the questions others won’t; moved to Colorado in 2016 and is a co-owner of Boulder Bodyworker

Feedback Omnium featured in Tiny House

From USA Triathlon

Olympian Katie Zaferes and husband and fellow elite triathlete Tommy built a custom tiny home in Santa Cruz, Calif., this offseason and were featured on the FYI reality show Tiny House Nation on March 25.

Golden, Colorado’s Feedback Sports was featured as the ultra-compact Omnium trainer and folding work stand fit well in small spaces…

When recently-married pro triathletes Katie and Tommy Zaferes daydreamed about their first home together, they didn’t envision a sprawling estate or even a tidy colonial. There were no plans for a tricked-out home gym, an indoor lap pool or soaring walls where they could display their impressive collection of awards from racing around the world. In fact, the couple wanted just the opposite. They wanted a tiny home.

Enter Tiny House Nation, the popular FYI reality show that hooks people up with their very own, custom-designed mini-home. On March 25, the Zaferes’ and their brand-new Santa, Cruz, Calif., house — all 370 square feet of it — were featured on an episode. Here, we caught up with the couple about their stint on reality TV and details about their dainty dwelling.

Read the full article

Watch the full episode: http://www.fyi.tv/shows/tiny-house-nation/season-4/episode-12