Women’s Wednesday: The Aquatic Wisdom of Sarah Thomas

By Lisa Ingarfield

Photo by Ken Classen

Sarah Thomas was born to swim. She picked up the sport at age seven and has been swimming pretty much ever since. This past July, she broke her own world record, swimming 104 miles in Lake Champlain, from Rouses Point, New York, to Vermont and back again. Her solo swim was unassisted, non-wetsuit, and current neutral. The water was also full of lampreys. I wasn’t sure what a lamprey was, so I looked them up. Yeah, they are the stuff of nightmares. I recently wrote about my fears of swimming in open water without a wetsuit because of the perils of lake or ocean creatures; Sarah clearly does not have those same concerns.

As I was swimming laps this morning, I was mentally tracking how long I would have to be in the pool to cover 104 miles. The answer? A really long time. It took Sarah 67 hours, 16 minutes, and 12 seconds. Five hours faster than she expected. Three nights, two sunrises. Not only was this a phenomenal physical feat, it was also a mental one. While Sarah has a crew on her long, nay, mammoth swim challenges, she is swimming alone. The mental resilience needed to conquer the mind games that occur is mighty.

Photo by Ken Classen

Her epic 104 mile swim sits on the shoulders of the many other awe-inspiring open water marathon swim challenges she has completed over her thirty-five years. After her first marathon open water swim in Horsetooth Reservoir (a 10K), her swimming world expanded. She met some Catalina Channel swimmers and decided she would give that race a try in 2010. Catalina is an island off the coast of Los Angeles and the channel from the island to the mainland is about 21 miles. Although she finished the swim, she reflected on what a tough experience it was for her. The swim began around midnight, and she hadn’t done a good job of prepping, and then executing, her nutrition plan leading to her ‘crashing’ in the last four hours. There was a significant cross wind and she just couldn’t find her rhythm. Sarah finished the race in just over nine hours, which is still a pretty fast pace. She described to me the aftermath with a chuckle. It included an inability to lift her arms over her head for a week, a swollen tongue from all the salt water, and chafing in places she didn’t even know you could chafe. And so she decreed: “This is it, I’m done.” Famous last words.

Photo by Ken Classen

For any non-endurance athletes reading this, what usually happens is we routinely declare that we are one and done on these mammoth athletic exploits. And then the amnesia sets in. Sometimes it takes a few days, or perhaps a couple of weeks. But before long, the narrative changes and the race that was so horrific morphs into something not so bad. This softening of our feelings towards an endurance event inevitably leads us to sign up for another one. And that is what Sarah did. She signed up to swim across the English Channel.

In preparation for her English Channel swim, Sarah completed a 28.5 mile swim around Manhattan Island (2nd woman/5th overall) and the Tampa Bay Marathon swim (she won this race, although swimmers were pulled early because of a storm). Then, on a clear, sunny day in 2012, Sarah swam from England to France in just over 11 hours. “I swam with joy the entire way,” she said. When she got to the shore in France, the clientele from a local restaurant had come to the beach to cheer her on. The restaurateur handed her a glass of champagne as she walked from the water. It was a “magical moment” she reminisces. On finishing the English Channel swim, Sarah was now a proud member of the Triple Crown club — swimmers who’ve successfully completed the English Channel, Catalina Channel, and Manhattan Island swims.

Photo by Ken Classen

Sarah’s other open water accomplishments include swimming the length of Loch Ness in Scotland (no monster sightings, I am afraid), an out and back across Lake Tahoe (she was the first swimmer and woman to do this) and swimming across Lake Memphremagog in Newport, VT. Originally, this was a 25 mile race but the race director called her to see if she wanted to do 50 miles–an out and back. “I’m never one to back down from a challenge” she declared confidently. This was her first 50 mile swim, and a tough one mentally: “I had to really dig deep.” And, her resilience paid off; she was the first ever swimmer to complete the 50 mile swim. Sarah has accrued an impressive litany of firsts. And her next challenge, because yes, you can top a 104 mile world record breaking swim, could be another. In September 2019, she will attempt to swim the English Channel crossing four times—England-France-England-France-England. Swimmers have tried, but no one yet has been triumphant.

Photo by Ken Classen

Sarah Thomas is a formidable force in open water marathon swimming and one of the top competitors in the country from right here in land-locked Colorado. One of the insights she shared, and one that has stuck with me since we met, is that in every race, experience, or adventure, there is always something to learn. So often we close our minds, and doom ourselves to repeat the same missteps over and over. We have to allow for those moments to teach us. Humility is how we become better at what we do.

If you’d like to learn more, you can follow Sarah’s swimming adventures and progress on her official Facebook page.

4-3-2-1: Butterfield’s 2017 Season a Steady Progression to the Top

303Triathlon has been fortunate to work with Tyler and Nikki Butterfield over the past 3+ years.  During this time, we have watched as Tyler has become a successful triathlete.  In chatting with Nikki recently, I heard no signs of regret or doubt in her decision to step away from a career as a professional triathlon to be a full time mom of 3, wife and business manager for Tyler.  As they settle into life on the ‘farm’, Nikki has recently been able to find time to get out and do some running again .

August 23, 2017 – A number of changes, both professionally and personally, have proven beneficial to pro triathlete Tyler Butterfield’s 2017 racing season. Starting with a fourth place finish in January, Butterfield steadily progressed to a victory in June, and now has his sights set on another top performance at the Ironman World Championship in October in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.


Butterfield kicked the cobwebs off in early 2017 at Ironman 70.3 Dubai, finishing fourth amid a world-class field. Next up was the Ironman North American Championship in The Woodlands, Texas, where Butterfield broke the eight-hour mark to earn third on the podium. He clocked a finish time of 7:58:29, holding off hard-charging rival and fourth-place finisher Will Clarke by 33 seconds. Butterfield’s upward trajectory continued in May at Ironman 70.3 Monterrey, the Pan American Pro Championship, where he scored second place, just 25 seconds shy of the win and bested only by men’s champion Kevin Collington.

In June, Butterfield headed to Ironman 70.3 Raleigh, where his run came into winning form. After a battle on the bike among the leading men, Butterfield started the half marathon more than three minutes in arrears to Andrew Yoder. He steadily gained ground, however, making the pass to claim the lead two thirds of the way into the run leg. His 3:53:22 finish ultimately gave him a 1:48 cushion over runner-up Yoder. This steady string of four impressive results was due in part to a focused winter where Butterfield—in contrast to prior years—avoided taking on too much travel and was able to get in sync in a solid training routine at home in Boulder, Colorado.

Butterfield also started June’s Ironman Boulder, intending to tackle the local course as a training exercise. Unfortunately, a slice in his tire while riding in third place derailed his plan. Butterfield awaited a local friend, who kindly secured a training wheel and helped him get back on the road after a 20-minute delay. In accepting “outside assistance” from his friend, Butterfield effectively withdrew from the competition, as athletes may only receive help from race officials; however, intent on making the most of the situation and logging a hard practice day, he continued. After 10 miles of the marathon—enough of an effort to justify time off during an upcoming holiday in Bermuda—he called it a day and pulled off the course.

The Butterfield family then traveled to Tyler’s native Bermuda for a two-week stretch to enjoy a family reunion and watch the America’s Cup sailing championship. Since late June, Butterfield has been back in Boulder, hard at work preparing for two world championship events: the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Chattanooga, Tennessee (September 9th) and the Ironman World Championship in Kailua-Kona (October 14th).

Although Butterfield has spent more time grounded in Boulder than in years past, his family and home life has still seen several exciting and unusual changes in 2017. Baby Grace, the Butterfield’s third child, was welcomed into the family on January 12th, joining sister Savana and brother Walker. With a desire for space for their children to be outside and a growing passion for animals, the Butterfields moved from their mountain home to a hobby farm in Longmont, Colorado, where they’ve accumulated a large population of animals including five horses, three llamas, seven goats, a dozen chickens, two guinea fowl, two dogs and two cats. The children are thriving on farm life and Nikki (Tyler’s wife and retired pro triathlete) has her hands full with activities as diverse as mucking out horse stalls, bottle feeding baby goats, and assisting in the delivery of a baby llama (with Tyler’s help, as well). When not swimming, cycling, or running, Tyler is occasionally found driving a tractor.

The family will leave the farm temporarily in October to attend the Ironman World Championship, joining Butterfield’s parents, brother, uncle, and aunt, who make the journey annually. Nikki and the children have been in Kona in alternate years (depending on whether or not Nikki has been pregnant at the time), which seem to correspond to Tyler’s success on the island; they were there as support for his seventh place in 2013 and fifth place in 2015, while they had to skip the race in 2014 and 2016, when he did not finish. The entire family is hopeful that the year on/year off pattern continues for this year at least, and that with everyone on hand to cheer, 2017 will prove the best year yet for Butterfield.

For more information please visit Butterfieldracing.com

Weekend Preview: Have a Lovely Weekend

Triathlon Events

Saturday August 12th

 

USAT Age Group Olympic National Championships

Omaha, NE


Greeley Kids Triathlon

Greeley


Sunday August 13th

 

USAT Age Group Sprint National Championships

Omaha, NE


Chatfield Classic

Littleton


Steamboat Triathlon

Steamboat Springs



Cycling Events

Thursday August 10th

 

Velorama Colorado Classic

Colorado Springs stage

Denver Expo and party


DUST2: Shaeffer’s Track

Pagosa Springs


Dirt Jumps & Donuts

Castle Rock


BVV Track Night

Erie


REVO CX Strength & Conditioning

Boulder


Friday August 11th

 

Velorama Colorado Classic

Breckenridge – Men’s Race

Denver – Women’s Race


Saturday August 12th

 

2nd Annual Bite the Bullet Gran Fondo

Ft. Collins

 

Second Annual FoCo Fondo’s Bite the Bullet Gravel Fondo in Fort Collins, Colorado, hosted at New Belgium Brewing.  Fort Collins first Gravel Fondo!

Here’s the short and simple:

Remote gravel roads, open spaces, heavily stocked aid stations, rolling technical support, timed segments with cash prizes, New Belgium beer, food truck meals. The Start/Finish venue will be at New Belgium Brewing. Short and long routes.

Registration is LIVE, long route fee $55 for June, $60 for July, $70 for August, $10 cheaper for short route.


Velorama Colorado Classic

Denver


USAC Hill Climb National Championships

Colorado Springs


Pikes Peak Cycling Gran Fondo

Colorado Springs


BStrong Ride

Boulder


Colorado Trail Classic

Molas Pass, Silverton


Leadville Trail 100

Leadville


Steamboat Stinger MTB Race

Steamboat Springs


Bike MS Bighorn Country Classic

Sheridan, Wy


Velorama Mayor’s Ride & Kid Ciclova

Denver


Pioneers of the Peloton

Denver


Lee Likes Bikes Level 2 MTB Skills Clinic

Boulder


Sunday August 13th

 

Avista Women’s Weekly Ride

Louisville


Velorama Colorado Classic

Denver


Bike MS Bighorn Country Classic

Sheridan, Wy

 

IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder Pro Race Wrap Up!

Below you will find everything involving the professional male and female athletes from Saturday’s race, from the pro panel talk the day before the race, Tim Don’s emotional finish chute moments with his family, all the way through 303Radio’s finish line interviews… Check it out!

Pro panel here at IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder! #boulder703 David Downey Ben Hoffman Tim Don Alicia Kaye Jeanni Seymour Jocelyn Gardner McCauley Rodolphe Rudy von Berg

 

 

 

 

 

Incredible joyous emotion from Tim Don with his family in the finish chute (video by Mark Cathcart):

The Pro Women finish line video:


 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pro women’s podium, complete with champagne!

Finish Line interviews with the Pros, by 303Radio’s Rich Soares:

IRONMAN 70.3 Race Week: Helpful Pre-race jitters, or Debilitating anxiety?

From Training Peaks

Avoiding Mental Sabotage Part 4: How to Channel Pre-Race Anxiety

BY PATRICK J. COHN, PH.D. AND ANDRE BEKKER
In part four of our continuing series on mastering your mental skills for race-day, we discuss how to properly channel your pre-race anxiety into positive energy and focus.

How to Cope with Pre-Race Jitters
Every triathlete, runner or cyclist, no matter their level, experiences pre-race jitters—the feeling of excitement or butterflies in your stomach prior to the start of a race. However, some athletes turn pre-race jitters into performance anxiety. Pre-race jitters are a natural part of your racing, but pre-race performance anxiety will cause most athletes to tense up, worry about their performance and ultimately not perform up to their ability.

Are Pre-Race Jitters Helpful to Your Performance?
The first step is to find out if you experience common pre-race jitters or if you are anxious or scared. The difference is that pre-race jitters or butterflies are helpful to your race—they help you focus and perform better.

However, real “performance anxiety” is a reaction to stress or fear about the event that can cause excess tension. We think that pre-race jitters are a form of respect for the event you are about to engage in and part of the physical way your body prepares for the race.

How can you distinguish between pre-race jitters and performance anxiety? Look at the characteristic of each below:

Pre-game Jitters
You feel excited to get the race started.
You feel physically up and alert.
You think clearly about what you want to accomplish.
You feel ready to tackle any challenge that comes your way.
You feel your heart beating harder, but you think it’s natural and helpful.
When the race starts, you relax, get into the flow, and don’t focus on how you are feeling.
You have energy to keep going until the end of the race.
Performance Anxiety
You are over-excited about the race and feel scared before you start.
You feel physically sick to your stomach.
You have excess internal chatter and can’t think clearly or calmly.
You are worried about what you might encounter during the race.
You feel physical symptoms such as an increased heart rate, but worry that you are anxious or uptight.
You feel anxious or tight well into the start of the race and it may last for the entire event.
You feel drained and exhausted before the competition even starts.
If you identify with pre-race jitters, that’s great. That’s what you want to feel just before the event. You want to embrace the pre-race jitters.

If you identify more with performance anxiety above, you’ll have to learn how to overcome your performance anxiety by channeling it in a more constructive way…

Read the full story

Weekend Preview: It’s an OWS Weekend

Triathlon Events

Thursday July 27th

 

Stroke n Stride

Boulder


Saturday July 29th

 

Rueter-Hess OWS

Parker


Carter Lake Crossing

Loveland


BAM Swim

Boulder


Reverse Indoor Tryathlon #3

Lone Tree


Sunday July 30th

 

Outdoor Diva Sprint Tri

Longmont


Legend Rocky Mountain Tri – CANCELLED


Mark Your Calendar

Saturday August 5th

XTERRA Indian Peaks returns to Eldora.  After a 3 year detour over the Continental Divide to Snow Mountain Ranch the very popular XTERRA Indian Peak off road triathlon is returning to the Eldora Mountain Resort on August 5th.

The adventure begins with a chilly 1000m swim in Peterson Lake and after a 600 uphill run to the transition area competitors will head off on a 2 loop 23km bike on the trails of the Eldora Nordic Center.  This bike course offers a bit of everything, dirt road, double track, tight descents, muddy climbs, singletrack and a bit of no track.  After dismounting the bike the athletes will embark on what many call the best XTERRA run course out there.  This 4 mile run is a true trail challenge with steep climbs, singletrack and primitive trails that will put the hurt on even the most seasoned pro.



Cycling Events

Thursday July 27th

 

BVSC Bike Ed Program

Boulder


BVV Track Night

Erie


REVO CX Strength & Conditioning

Boulder


Tour de Freeze

High Line Canal


The Heart of Colorado

Manitou Springs


Endurance Cycling Camp

Steamboat Springs


Friday July 28th

 

Pastries on the Path

Boulder


Leadville Stage Race

Leadville


Salida Classic

Salida


Tour de Freeze

High Line Canal


The Heart of Colorado

Manitou Springs


Endurance Cycling Camp

Steamboat Springs


Saturday July 29th

 

Denver to Aspen Classic

Denver


14th Annual Grin & Barrett Charity Ride

Montrose


Breck 100

Breckenridge


Laramie Enduro

Laramie, Wy


DUST2: Bush’s Pump Track

Pagosa Springs


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 Mtb Skills Clinic

Boulder


Leadville Stage Race

Leadville


Salida Classic

Salida


Tour de Freeze

High Line Canal


The Heart of Colorado

Manitou Springs


Endurance Cycling Camp

Steamboat Springs


Sunday July 30th

 

Avista Women’s Weekly Ride

Louisville


Leadville Stage Race

Leadville


Salida Classic

Salida


Tour de Freeze

High Line Canal


The Heart of Colorado

Manitou Springs


Endurance Cycling Camp

Steamboat Springs

Tri Coach Tuesday: D3 Coach and Athlete Mike Ricci’s BPT Recap

by Mike Ricci, Head Coach and Founder, D3 Multisport

 

 

The BIG EVENT of the summer was here for the Ricci Family. It was one of THE most important events on the Ricci calendar. 1:20 pm on Sunday we were going to see “Cars 3” There was no taper for this and I had to race the Boulder Peak beforehand. And that meant getting the car packed up at the Res, unpacked at home, showered and to the theater in time. I know you’ll be glad to know we made it with time to spare. Now, onto the 2nd important event of July 9th.

 

 

I first raced Boulder Peak in 1996 and then raced it every year until 2001. Looking back historically I’ve raced it 7 times, including this weekend. I’ve always loved the challenge of Olde Stage, the steep competition and the fact that it’s a strength course. The swim is usually choppy, the run up the beach takes some strength (in the old days we used to run up the big hill on the North side of the Res – a good 90” run from swim exit to transition), you have Olde Stage on the bike and most of the run is on gravel with some small rollers. There’s nowhere to hide on this course – you are either fit or you’re not. Unfortunately for me, going into this race, I’m was somewhere in between.

 

In 1999, the race was an Ironman Qualifier and I was pumped to have a KQ in my backyard. The competition was tough that year! I swam around 23 minutes, biked 1:09 and ran under 39 minutes, yet I was still 14th in my AG, even though I went 2:14. That was my fastest time as it was the only time I picked the Peak as my A race. For historical perspective, this year, a 2:14 gets you second in the 30-34. In 1999, the 1st slot in my AG went to a guy who went 2:01 or in that range.

 

Although this wasn’t an A race for me, I was pretty happy to be racing the Peak again, the first time since 2009 (2:24 and 11th AG). The fact that Barry Siff was back and Olde Stage was part of the bike course played a big part in my decision. Besides my 14th AG in 1999, I’ve had a few 11th and 12th places along the way, but I’ve never cracked the top 10 in my AG. The competition is always tough and it’s not a course that suits my style of racing, but I enjoy the challenge anyway. I’ve always been a bit of a 2nd half racer, usually peaking late in the season for an out of town race.

 

 

Up until a few weeks ago, I had no intention of racing the Peak in 2017, but I wanted to challenge myself and I knew I would train hard knowing this is a race that is serious and like I said above, there’s nowhere to hide out there.

Since I haven’t really trained since 2011, my ‘ability to suffer’ is really my limiter. So, I set out to do that these last few weeks with some shorter races and putting hard workouts back to back. I’ve seen a nice progression and I had a few small goals for the Peak.

1) Was to break 2:30 for the entire race.

2) Be top 10 in the AG

3) Run a strong race in the 7:20 range off the bike

While self-coaching, I’m usually able to look at things clearly and I have plenty of good coaches and resources to ask if I get stuck on a problem.

The one part I usually get wrong is doing too much, too close to a race. Take Friday as an example:

Swim: 4×200 descend and I hit my best swim times in 4 years. Probably a mistake.

Run: 8×400 at 5k pace. Felt easy and gave me some confidence that things are trending correctly.

Bike: Olde Stage, Jamestown, and then back side of Lee Hill – ended up riding almost 3 hours, but the legs felt good, so why not?

On Saturday night as I was going up the stairs in my house, I realized my legs were pretty empty – but that’s ok! I kept telling myself that this season isn’t about the Boulder Peak, and it’s not.

So, the only real challenge that I find to being self coached is knowing when to say ‘enough’. I could fill Training Peaks with 6 hour training days every day and as much as I’d like to bounce back day after day, it’s not going to happen. Not with 2 small kids and a business to manage. So, I do what I know works, and constantly work on the weaknesses as I see them. For me, the joy is in doing workouts I enjoy – hard short swim workouts – 100s, 200s etc: hard bike workouts with high power and burning legs, and running decent speed sessions where I see progress each week. Otherwise, I lose focus, do the same workouts over and over and end up bored and sitting on my toukas vs training.

The Race:

I got there early, warmed up and the legs felt tired, but that was to be expected. Everything was smooth and to be honest without as much pomp and circumstance, the race lacked some excitement and the ‘edge’ was missing. I was ready to roll though and fully cafienated.

I started at the front of the swim and knowing that I needed everything I had for the run, I swam one speed the entire way and that was ‘easy to moderate’. I had clean water the entire way, the buoys were visible to me, and I stood up at about 24:10. That was more than I was hoping for and I was off to a great start. I was 6th out of the swim.

Dave Sheanin with PJ Snyder, AiT

I eased into the bike and felt strong going out Jay and onto 36. The climb was solid and I matched my best time from my repeats these past few weeks and all was going according to plan. The canyon was as fast as always, Nelson was awesome, and the rollers on 63rd, well they chewed me up a bit! If I had listened to one wise soul, Dave, I would have saved some of my energy going up Olde Stage. But I’m too stubborn for that. I rode steady along 63rd hoping to minimize any damage, and whenever I tried to lift the effort, I could feel my legs say ‘no thanks’. As much as I would like to say this is a fitness issues, it’s not. It was more of a recovery issue. Had I done my Friday workout on Wednesday or Thursday I think I would have felt different. But the circumstances are what they are and I had to get ready mentally for the bike. I had a few guys in my AG blow by me on the bike, but only a couple and I wasn’t about to chase anyone down. I ended up biking my slowest time and off the bike in 7th in my AG. I only lost 1 place, when it felt like I lost 5. For those keeping track at home, watts were in the HIM range – 83% of FTP. Not stellar by any means. Still doing ok mentally and ready to move up on the run.

I took my time in T2 and put on socks. I race with orthotics now and if I race without socks, I get nasty blisters so better to be safe than sorry! I took it out way too fast, after telling myself not to all week. I was hurting 800m in and I knew I was in for a tough run. I only had one gear and just ran easy to moderate – I wasn’t cramping or having nutrition issues, but I was just cooked. Moving forward was easy, but moving faster wasn’t happening. It was a slow, easy run, but just in the middle of a race. Sometimes, that happens! I saw Jim Hallberg coming in strong, 2nd in the Elite wave, as well as Julian Wheating who is part of our D3 Elite Team. Very happy to report one of my athletes, Greg Lindquist, rocked the race as well coming in 4th Elite. Just as a side note, Jim, Dore Berens, and Casey Fleming all hit the podium too – and they are part of our Elite Team. Good to see the focused training paying off! D3 Coach Dave did race with Athletes in Tandem, Coach Simon hit the podium, and Coach Alison was 3rd as well. Of course, I’m biased, but I think we have the best group of coaches in the business – they can walk the walk and talk the talk. And I don’t mean by just being quick on race day but their athletes all improve, race to race, season to season.

 

Back to the run: I had quite a few people come around me on the run, and that’s something I’m not used to, but when there’s nothing you can do about it – you just keep plodding along. I came into the finish zone and ran in with my 9 year old Hope who was kind enough to slow down for me and we finished together and jumped into the slip and slide. That was awesome. My run time was close to 50 minutes and if you told me I’d run that slow pre-race, I would have laughed, but on second thought, maybe I wouldn’t have! You reap what you sow and since I’m in that in between place with my fitness, I can accept it. It’s up to me and no one else to change it.

 

I ended up at 2:34 and change, my slowest BPT, and of course I missed the top 10 by 30 seconds. I remember being passed along the dam before you hit the Marina and I had one of those moments where I said “Dude we are in 19th and 20th place, so who cares” Well, I guess I care because I’ll be back as a 50 year old next season, and I’ll be on a mission to get even further into the top 10.

The Boulder Peak is back baby and I am for the time being as well!

Legendary pro triathlete & coach Siri Lindley says Boulder Peak is “best of the best”

Siri Lindley – Kona, 2014 (Photo: Bill Plock, 303Triathlon)

303Radio hosts Rich Soares and Bill Plock had the opportunity to interview legendary pro triathlete and coach Siri Lindley yesterday and talk about her passion for the Boulder Peak race. Siri calls the Boulder Peak Tri the “best of the best” compared to all other races – worldwide.

“Truly, of all the iconic races that I’ve been to around the world, like Escape from Alcatraz, Wildflower, Lake Geneva in Switzerland… I seriously think the Boulder Peak triathlon is the best of the best as far as the energy, the atmosphere, the passion that people have in this area for the sport, and for getting out there and pushing their limits…”

Take a listen to this teaser!

And be sure to tune in tomorrow when the full hour interview with Siri Lindley is being released – she discusses her Colorado roots, her days as a pro triathlete, coaching Mirinda “Rinny” Carfrae, her Sirius Athletes, and her new Believe Ranch & Rescue charity.

Also, don’t miss hearing Siri speak at the “Get Psyched for the Peak” party at Colorado Multisport Wednesday night, along with 5430 founder Barry Siff, pro triathlete Cameron Dye, Skirt Sports owner Nicole Deboom, and Mental Skills coach Will Murray.

Weekend Preview: Summer Is Here

Triathlon Events

Thursday June 22nd

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Vixxen Racing OWS Clinic

Boulder Reservoir


Stroke & Stride

Boulder Reservoir


Friday June 23rd

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Saturday June 24th

 

TriBella Women’s Triathlon

Cherry Creek Reservoir


Solstice Swim

Union Reservoir


Alison Dunlap Level II MTB Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Lake to Lake Triathlon

Loveland


Tri the Boat – Sprint & Oly

Stagecoach Reservoir, Steamboat Springs


Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Sunday June 25th

 

South Suburban Indoor TRYathlon

Centennial


Boulder Sunrise Triathlon-Duathlon-Run

Boulder Reservoir


Tri the Boat – Half

Stagecoach Reservoir, Steamboat Springs


Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Alison Dunlap Level II MTB Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


USAT Paratriathlon National Championships

Kenosha, Wi



Cycling Events

Thursday June 22nd

 

BVV Track Night

Erie


Friday June 23rd

 

Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


Chainless World Championships

Crested Butte


Saturday June 24th

 

2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies

The inaugural 2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies will bring seven timed and ranked stages to Colorado June 24-30. In addition to start and finish venues of Boulder and Colorado Springs, the event will visit Winter Park, Avon, Snowmass Village and Crested Butte Organisers expect the 600-rider peloton to sell-out, but a limited number of discounted


Colorado Bike MS

Ft. Collins


Alison Dunlap MTB Level II Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Prestige Imports Snowmass Loop MTB Fondo

Snowmass


Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


WP Epic Single Track: Super Loop

Winter Park


Pedaling 4 Parkinson’s

Lone Tree


Fat Tire 40

Crested Butte


4SOH

Ft. Collins


Art by Bike Tours of Loveland

Loveland


USA Pro Road & TT National Championships


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 MTB Skills Clinic

Boulder


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1.5 MTB Skills Clinic

Erie


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 MTB Skills Clinic

Boulder


Community Cycles Membership Party

Boulder


Sunday June 25th

 

2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies

The inaugural 2017 Mavic Haute Route Rockies will bring seven timed and ranked stages to Colorado June 24-30. In addition to start and finish venues of Boulder and Colorado Springs, the event will visit Winter Park, Avon, Snowmass Village and Crested Butte Organisers expect the 600-rider peloton to sell-out, but a limited number of discounted


Parker Mainstreet Criterium

Parker


SMC – Breck Mtn Enduro

Breckenridge


Colorado Bike MS

Ft. Collins


Alison Dunlap MTB Level II Skills Clinic

Colorado Springs


Grinta Jr Devo Camp

Steamboat Springs


SOH

Ft. Collins


Avista Women’s Weekly Ride

Louisville


USA Pro Road & TT National Championships

Weekend Preview: Happy Father’s Day

Triathlon Events

Saturday June 17th

 

XTERRA Lory – SOLD OUT

Ft. Collins

 

One of the best beginner XTERRA races around.  Mark your calendar for next year’s event.  It sells out fast!


Lookout Mountain Triathlon

Golden


Leadville Trail Marathon & Heavy Half

Leadville


2017 National Duathlon Championships

Bend, Oregon


Sunday June 18th

 

Mt. Evans Ascent

Idaho Springs


2017 National Duathlon Championships

Bend, Oregon



 

Cycling Events

Saturday June 17th

 

Mountain Top Experience Ride

Florissant, Teller County, Co


Colorado Death Ride

Durango


Denver Century Ride

Stapleton


Bailey HUNDO

Bailey


John Stenner Memorial Colorado TT Championships

Keensburg


Kona Bike Demo

Boulder


Lee Likes Bikes Level 1 Mtb Skills Clinic 

Boulder


Lee Likes Bikes Level 2 Mtb Skills Clinic 

Boulder


G’Knight Ride

Longmont


Sunday June 18th

 

Bicycle Tour of Colorado

Pagosa Springs


Mt Evans Ascent

Idaho Springs


Guanella Pass Hill Climb

Georgetown


FIBArk MTB Race

Salida


Day in the Dirt

Boulder


Avista Women’s Weekly Ride

Louisville


Kona Demo Day

Boulder