Tri Coach Tuesday: Making Hard Workouts Easy (Or At Least Easier)

by Will Murray, D3 Multisport Mental Skills Coach

 

When your brain senses pain, it says to itself, “Bad. Make it stop.” When you are doing high-intensity workouts, your brain says, “Pain. Bad. Make it stop.” But you do hard workouts for a reason—they really, really work to make you fitter, stronger and faster.

One easy way to increase the benefit of your high-intensity workouts is to bring your brain along with you. When your brain understands the purpose of these workouts, the benefits of the workouts and what these workouts look like, this brain of yours will help you and stop trying to get you to stop.

 

Here’s how to do it.

1. **State the purpose of your workout.** If it’s a high-intensity workout intending to raise your upper limit (VO2max), state that. If it’s a recovery workout, say that.
2. **State the benefit of this workout to you.** A high-intensity workout brings you benefit by raising your lactate threshold, improving your VO2max, even recruiting mitochondria, the powerhouses of your cells. A recovery workout helps by mobilizing and clearing metabolic products from previous workouts and preparing you for future workouts.
3. **Rehearse your perfect workout.** Make a movie in your mind’s eye, seeing yourself over there, watching a movie of yourself doing your workout. This “seeing yourself over there” is called a dissociated perspective. The key is the perfect movie, just as you want and intend your workout to go. If you hit any snags, stop the movie, back it up, make it perfect, then run it to the end. You are the director of this movie—direct it to be just as you wish it to go.
4. **Rehearse your workout again**, this time seen through your own eyes and feeling it in your own skin (this is called an associated perspective). Once again, make the movie go perfectly, just as you wish it would go.
5. **Make one more perfect movie, in fast motion.** The entire movie should take only five seconds.

 

How does this work?

First, your brain is really good at seeing patterns. It looks for patterns, just as a good golden retriever looks for what you toss at it to retrieve it. So, when you explain to your brain the purpose and benefits of the workout, your brain looks for those things.

Second, there is an area of your brain that stores memories of events that haven’t happened yet (this area is called Brodmann’s Area). You can install a future memory in this area of your brain of exactly what you want to happen in your workout, and that future memory is what your brain is looking for. Therefore, it isn’t surprised by the discomfort of a hard workout, it sees it as desirable. Instead of objecting to the pain, it expects it.

That’s it. The whole five-step process, once you have practiced it two or three times, will take you less than one minute, maybe even half that. And it will recruit your brain to help you do your workout as prescribed, and once and for all eliminate all the negotiations and objections of your mind when you are doing your perfect workouts. Do this process before every single workout and before every race, and soon it will become as automatic as rinsing your swim goggles, buckling your bike helmet or lacing up your running shoes.

Weekend Preview: 38th Annual Longmont Triathlon

Triathlon Events

Saturday June 2nd

 

Colorado Triathlon – SOLD OUT

Boulder


14th Annual Longmont Kids Triathlon & Try-a-Tri

Longmont


Little Bellas MTB Camp

Lakewood


FoCo Kids Triathlon

Ft. Collins


Grant Ranch OWS

Lakewood


Sunday June 3rd

 

38th Annual Longmont Triathlon

Longmont


Boulder.Bike.Bolder,: Rachel Joyce & Dana Platin Bike Clinic

Boulder


9th Annual Beti Bike Bash

Lakewood


Little Bellas MTB Clinic

Lakewood


Grant Ranch OWS

Lakewood



Cycling Events

Saturday June 2nd

 

Palisade Gran Fondo

Palisade


Colorado Bike Expo @ ERock

Castle Rock


Beti Bike Bash

Lakewood


ERock Sunrise Sunset

Castle Rock


20th Annual Buena Vista Bike Fest

Buena Vista


47th Annual Fred Prindle Memorial City park Criterium

Denver


Firebird XC

Eagle


Burning Can Fest

Lyons


Little Bella MTB Camp

Lakewood


BVV Saturday Sprints

Erie


Dirty Kanza

Emporia, KS


Sunday June 3rd

 

Guanella Pass Hill Climb & Gran Fondo

Georgetown


Grand Enduro

Grand Junction


Little Bella MTB Camp

Lakewood


9th Annual Beti Bike Bash

Lakewood


Elephant Rock ride

Castle Rock


Colorado Bike Expo @ ERock

Castle Rock

 

Bolder Boulder celebrates 40 years of city’s iconic race

40 Years Bold,” a new book produced by the Daily Camera and the Bolder Boulder, celebrates 40 years of Boulder’s iconic 10K race.

From the Daily Camera

The cover of the new book about the history of the Bolder Boulder, “40 Years Bold,” captures well the spirit of this iconic 10K road race that will weave its way through the streets of Boulder for the 40th time on Memorial Day.

Daily Camera photographer Jeremy Papasso’s picture shows the packed start of the A wave of the 2014 Bolder Boulder.

Sprinting off the line, smiles on their faces, are some young, high school runners, caught in midstride. In the lead is a fitlooking runner in a Batman costume. Another costumed runner is to his left, while just behind them is a female A wave runner. Over on the left side of the start is a masters runner.

Behind them, filling the cover, is a mass of densely packed runners of varying shapes and sizes. Here we see the competitiveness and size of the Bolder Boulder — surely no other race has as many fast runners in front.

Behind these fast runners, as the book shows, come some of the tens of thousands of other runners and walkers, friends and family, who follow the A wavers into the Folsom Field finish. These are some of the ingredients that make the Bolder Boulder an integral part of Boulder, a rite of spring that many of us run, walk, volunteer at or simply watch.

Then there is the book title: “40 Years Bold.” Appropriate, for the Bolder Boulder has long been bold and innovative in making changes and setting the tone for the Running Boom, which was in its infancy in that first Bolder back in 1979.

Read the full story

Weekend Preview: Happy Weekend

Triathlon Events

Saturday March 17th

 

MCTC Regional Championships & Havasu Triathlon

Lake Havasu City, Az


Sunday March 18th

 

7th Annual Rock Classic Swim Meet

Castle Rock



Cycling Events

Saturday March 17th

 

Pedaling for St. Pat’s

Colorado Springs


CSU Cobb Lake Road Race

Ft. Collins


St. Patricks Day Ride

Glendale


4SOH

Ft. Collins


Leadville Winter Series 50k

Leadville


Sunday March 18th

CSU Oval Criterium

Ft. Collins


Staunton Spring Fatty Frenzy – Cancelled

Pine

 

“Tandem” Triathlete Dave Sheanin featured in MyFitnessPal Blog

From MyFitnessPal

It Takes Two to Cross These Finish Lines

As most endurance athletes near the finish line of a race, they relish in the applause and cheers from onlookers and use it to close out their sweaty efforts with a bang. But when Dave Sheanin, a 49-year old triathlete from Erie, Colorado, closes in on a finish line, he prefers the crowd’s attention be on the person directly in front of him.

Sheanin isn’t hoping another athlete will edge him out right before the finish line; instead, he’s acting as the engine behind his Athletes in Tandem partners as they swim, bike and run to countless finish lines as a pair. Athletes in Tandem (or AiT) is an organization that focuses on cycling, running and triathlon events, pairing endurance athletes with those who require use of adaptive equipment to participate in these activities.

Read the full article

2018 1st Endurance Team Announced

As you scroll through the list of athletes on the 2018 First Endurance Team, you may notice that more than half of them live and train in Colorado.   In addition, all of the new athletes added to their roster are from Boulder.

Among the new additions for the 2018 season is Maia Ignatz, a professional XTERRA athlete who lives, works and trains in Boulder.  Although recovering from a season ending injury in July 2017, Maia said she is ‘honored to be a part of the First Endurance Triathlon Team for 2018’. She adds, ‘I am grateful that First Endurance will be my nutrition during this crucial time for me, and I believe that I will be able to race again by mid-July. ‘

Watch for Maia at XTERRA Beaver Creek in July, XTERRA Pan Am Championships in September and on Maui in October for XTERRA World Championships.


2018 First Endurance Team

First Endurance is proud to announce its 17-member professional triathlon team for 2018. In 2017 the team earned high accolades; collectively the team won 4 podiums at world championships, set a World Record for the fastest IRONMAN (branded) time, set the fastest ever IRONMAN by an American, won the North American Ironman Championships, won 38 races and landed on the podium 81 times. For 2018 the team looks to continue to build upon these results while working hand in hand with First Endurance testing and collaborating in the development of products. Together with some of the best triathletes in the world, we continue to evolve our product line.

 

Returning Athletes:
Josiah Middaugh (FE athlete since 2004), Vail
Heather Wurtele (FE athlete since 2010)
Trevor Wurtele (FE athlete since 2010)
Cam Dye (FE athlete since 2011), Boulder
Branden Rakita (FE athlete since 2012), Colorado springs
Angela Naeth (FE athlete since 2013)
Matt Hanson – Fastest American IRONMAN, North American IRONMAN Champion (FE athlete since 2014)
Danielle Mack (FE athlete since 2014), Boulder
Kevin Collington (FE athlete since 2015)
Jeanni Seymour (FE athlete since 2016)
Tim Don – Current IRONMAN (branded) World Record Holder (FE athlete since 2017), Boulder

New Athletes:
Lindsey Jerdonek – ITU & long course triathlete, Boulder
Justin Metzler – long course triathlete, Boulder
Sam Long – XTERRA & long course triathlete, Boulder
Christen Brown – long course triathlete, Boulder
Maia Ignatz – XTERRA triathlete, Boulder
Jason West – short course triathlete, Boulder

 

Complete announcement here

 

Here It Is, the 2018 IRONMAN Boulder Bike Course

by Bill Plock

As the fifth Ironman Boulder approaches, about 40 people gathered at Colorado Multisport for the unveiling of a new bike course. There are many changes from last year.  In general this course should be a little bit faster with about 500 less feet of climbing and longer stretches of uninterrupted straight roads than last year.

The course is also two loops instead of three and very little of Highway 36 will be used. The notorious false flat of Jay road has been eliminated and riders head west on Neva road and east (downhill) on Nelson road, the steepest part of the course the last couple of years. There is an uphill section on St. Vrain road and an out and back on Hygiene road both of which aren’t as steep as Nelson.

 

The biggest change came by utilizing Hwy 119 (the diagonal) which is a divided highway. By working hard with transportation officials, Race Director, Tim Brosious was able secure the entire southbound lanes for a 12 mile, straight, out and back start to each loop before heading west toward the foothills. By having this road open only to racers, athletes should see good time splits with ample room to get into a good rhythm on this flat stretch of newly paved road

 

Race courses need to provide a fun, challenging and safe experience while impacting the community as little as possible. It would appear that in its fifth bike course version, those goals are being met better than ever. Longtime Ironman race director, Dave Christen said, “this is my favorite course so far and I think we will have a good chance at keeping it for a while.”

 

Please keep in mind that the course outlined in the video is not the full course as the last few miles in to town are being finalized at how it will connect to the run. The run is anticipated to stay basically the same and utilize Boulder Creek.

FB Live video here

Resolution Ready: Brain Training in conjunction with Physical Training Aids Memory

From The New York Times

A recent NY Times article discussed a study examining how exercise may enhance the effects of brain training.

Exercise broadly improves our memories and thinking skills, according to a wealth of science.

The evidence supporting similar benefits from so-called brain training has been much iffier, however, with most people performing better only on the specific types of games or tasks practiced in the program.

But an interesting new study published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience suggests that combining intense exercise and brain training might, over time, amplify the benefits of both for the brain, even in people whose minds already are working well…

… To find out, the researchers decided to study a group of healthy, young college students, a group that would be expected to have robust and vigorous memories. If an experimental program resulted in better memories in these people, the scientists reasoned, it should also have implications for those of us whose aging memories might be starting to stutter and fade…

… In general, the young people who had exercised, whether they also brain trained or not, were then more physically fit than those in the control group. They also, for the most part, performed better on memory tests. And those improvements spanned different types of memory, including the ability to rapidly differentiate among pictures of objects that looked similar, a skill not practiced in the brain-training group.

These enhancements in memory were most striking among the volunteers whose fitness had also improved the most, especially if they also practiced brain training.

In effect, more fitness resulted in stronger memories, Dr. Heisz says, with the brain training adding to that effect, even for a type of memory that was not part of the training.

Read the full article (link)