Weekend Preview: Happy Weekend

Triathlon Events

Saturday March 17th


MCTC Regional Championships & Havasu Triathlon

Lake Havasu City, Az

Sunday March 18th


7th Annual Rock Classic Swim Meet

Castle Rock

Cycling Events

Saturday March 17th


Pedaling for St. Pat’s

Colorado Springs

CSU Cobb Lake Road Race

Ft. Collins

St. Patricks Day Ride



Ft. Collins

Leadville Winter Series 50k


Sunday March 18th

CSU Oval Criterium

Ft. Collins

Staunton Spring Fatty Frenzy – Cancelled



“Tandem” Triathlete Dave Sheanin featured in MyFitnessPal Blog

From MyFitnessPal

It Takes Two to Cross These Finish Lines

As most endurance athletes near the finish line of a race, they relish in the applause and cheers from onlookers and use it to close out their sweaty efforts with a bang. But when Dave Sheanin, a 49-year old triathlete from Erie, Colorado, closes in on a finish line, he prefers the crowd’s attention be on the person directly in front of him.

Sheanin isn’t hoping another athlete will edge him out right before the finish line; instead, he’s acting as the engine behind his Athletes in Tandem partners as they swim, bike and run to countless finish lines as a pair. Athletes in Tandem (or AiT) is an organization that focuses on cycling, running and triathlon events, pairing endurance athletes with those who require use of adaptive equipment to participate in these activities.

Read the full article

2018 1st Endurance Team Announced

As you scroll through the list of athletes on the 2018 First Endurance Team, you may notice that more than half of them live and train in Colorado.   In addition, all of the new athletes added to their roster are from Boulder.

Among the new additions for the 2018 season is Maia Ignatz, a professional XTERRA athlete who lives, works and trains in Boulder.  Although recovering from a season ending injury in July 2017, Maia said she is ‘honored to be a part of the First Endurance Triathlon Team for 2018’. She adds, ‘I am grateful that First Endurance will be my nutrition during this crucial time for me, and I believe that I will be able to race again by mid-July. ‘

Watch for Maia at XTERRA Beaver Creek in July, XTERRA Pan Am Championships in September and on Maui in October for XTERRA World Championships.

2018 First Endurance Team

First Endurance is proud to announce its 17-member professional triathlon team for 2018. In 2017 the team earned high accolades; collectively the team won 4 podiums at world championships, set a World Record for the fastest IRONMAN (branded) time, set the fastest ever IRONMAN by an American, won the North American Ironman Championships, won 38 races and landed on the podium 81 times. For 2018 the team looks to continue to build upon these results while working hand in hand with First Endurance testing and collaborating in the development of products. Together with some of the best triathletes in the world, we continue to evolve our product line.


Returning Athletes:
Josiah Middaugh (FE athlete since 2004), Vail
Heather Wurtele (FE athlete since 2010)
Trevor Wurtele (FE athlete since 2010)
Cam Dye (FE athlete since 2011), Boulder
Branden Rakita (FE athlete since 2012), Colorado springs
Angela Naeth (FE athlete since 2013)
Matt Hanson – Fastest American IRONMAN, North American IRONMAN Champion (FE athlete since 2014)
Danielle Mack (FE athlete since 2014), Boulder
Kevin Collington (FE athlete since 2015)
Jeanni Seymour (FE athlete since 2016)
Tim Don – Current IRONMAN (branded) World Record Holder (FE athlete since 2017), Boulder

New Athletes:
Lindsey Jerdonek – ITU & long course triathlete, Boulder
Justin Metzler – long course triathlete, Boulder
Sam Long – XTERRA & long course triathlete, Boulder
Christen Brown – long course triathlete, Boulder
Maia Ignatz – XTERRA triathlete, Boulder
Jason West – short course triathlete, Boulder


Complete announcement here


Here It Is, the 2018 IRONMAN Boulder Bike Course

by Bill Plock

As the fifth Ironman Boulder approaches, about 40 people gathered at Colorado Multisport for the unveiling of a new bike course. There are many changes from last year.  In general this course should be a little bit faster with about 500 less feet of climbing and longer stretches of uninterrupted straight roads than last year.

The course is also two loops instead of three and very little of Highway 36 will be used. The notorious false flat of Jay road has been eliminated and riders head west on Neva road and east (downhill) on Nelson road, the steepest part of the course the last couple of years. There is an uphill section on St. Vrain road and an out and back on Hygiene road both of which aren’t as steep as Nelson.


The biggest change came by utilizing Hwy 119 (the diagonal) which is a divided highway. By working hard with transportation officials, Race Director, Tim Brosious was able secure the entire southbound lanes for a 12 mile, straight, out and back start to each loop before heading west toward the foothills. By having this road open only to racers, athletes should see good time splits with ample room to get into a good rhythm on this flat stretch of newly paved road


Race courses need to provide a fun, challenging and safe experience while impacting the community as little as possible. It would appear that in its fifth bike course version, those goals are being met better than ever. Longtime Ironman race director, Dave Christen said, “this is my favorite course so far and I think we will have a good chance at keeping it for a while.”


Please keep in mind that the course outlined in the video is not the full course as the last few miles in to town are being finalized at how it will connect to the run. The run is anticipated to stay basically the same and utilize Boulder Creek.

FB Live video here

Resolution Ready: Brain Training in conjunction with Physical Training Aids Memory

From The New York Times

A recent NY Times article discussed a study examining how exercise may enhance the effects of brain training.

Exercise broadly improves our memories and thinking skills, according to a wealth of science.

The evidence supporting similar benefits from so-called brain training has been much iffier, however, with most people performing better only on the specific types of games or tasks practiced in the program.

But an interesting new study published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience suggests that combining intense exercise and brain training might, over time, amplify the benefits of both for the brain, even in people whose minds already are working well…

… To find out, the researchers decided to study a group of healthy, young college students, a group that would be expected to have robust and vigorous memories. If an experimental program resulted in better memories in these people, the scientists reasoned, it should also have implications for those of us whose aging memories might be starting to stutter and fade…

… In general, the young people who had exercised, whether they also brain trained or not, were then more physically fit than those in the control group. They also, for the most part, performed better on memory tests. And those improvements spanned different types of memory, including the ability to rapidly differentiate among pictures of objects that looked similar, a skill not practiced in the brain-training group.

These enhancements in memory were most striking among the volunteers whose fitness had also improved the most, especially if they also practiced brain training.

In effect, more fitness resulted in stronger memories, Dr. Heisz says, with the brain training adding to that effect, even for a type of memory that was not part of the training.

Read the full article (link)

Colorado Athletes on Maui: Some hard working Ladies

Deanna McCurdy


This is my 3rd trip over to Maui for the race. My first year of getting my feet wet in the Pacific was quite intimidating. I learned a lot and vowed to train hard so I could return in 2016 and actually race, rather than merely participate in the event. While all the training and climbing hills over and over here in the Front Range prepared my legs and lungs, nothing could simulate the waves that crashed way over my 5’2” head, the monsoon rains, or the mud-fest of hike-a-biking on the race course in 2016. Fortunately, life has taught me much about digging in when the going gets tough and how to embrace the moment and laugh at the challenge at hand. (more on that to come) I finished 2nd in the 40-44 age group in 2016 and 7th overall amateur. I am really looking forward to racing Xterra Worlds this year and hope to end a rewarding season of racing on a memorable note.

How did I get into triathlon and find my way into racing off-road? In my life before having children, I was a runner. My husband taught me how to mountain bike while we were dating and we would spend weekends in the mountains camping and playing on the trails. After the birth of our 2nd child, however, our life changed.


My youngest daughter struggled a lot in those early months and years. She had breathing issues for much of her 1st year, spent a lot of time in the hospital hooked up to monitors, didn’t sleep for more than 2 hours continuously at night for over 2 years, and wasn’t reaching developmental milestones that most babies accomplish- no babbling, crawling, walking. When she was 16 months old, daughter’s neurologist called and matter of factly stated that test results confirmed that she had a rare genetic disorder called Angelman Syndrome (AS). He didn’t offer any consoling words or advice, just a recommendation to follow up with his office. As soon as I hung up the phone, I did what any parent would do – I flipped on the computer and googled the disorder. Bold, crushing words jumped off the screen at me… life-threatening seizures, no verbal communication, may never walk, sleep disorder, cognitive and developmental delays, requiring 24/7 lifelong care.

My world became very dark, not even the shades of gray that many function in daily, but black. I would get up in the morning after sleepless nights with my daughter, go through the motions of the day, just passing time, hiding from the rest of the world. I let the words I read consume me. I felt like all the beautiful dreams I had for my children and our future had died. My only solace was found in escaping to the trails for a weary run or bike ride. As I pounded the dirt, working my way through those stages of grief, disbelief, hurt, anger and sadness, I started to realize something. I didn’t have to let the darkness control my life. I could run. I could bike. I could do something.

I started dreaming more on the trail. I dreamt of curing Angelman Syndrome -after all, in 2008 it was cured genetically in the mouse model. While children are not mice, the science was there and researchers believed it not only could happen, but with the right funding and research, it could happen in the next 5-10 years. This dream gave me hope. It pushed me onward over the miles, further and faster.

I realized that I could either hide from the world, or let the world get to know me and my child through the sport that I sought comfort in. I signed up for my 1st triathlon, had success in it, so I signed up for another. As my daughter was challenged in therapy to learn how to walk, to communicate, and to feed herself, I challenged myself with bigger races, bigger goals. What has followed in the years since that life-changing phone call has been an adventure more rewarding than I could have ever imagined. While Angelman Syndrome is still not cured and each day at our house presents new challenges, human clinical trials for quite a few therapeutics, including a very promising gene therapy approach to curing AS are just around the corner.



And my racing… I have been fortunate enough to race not only all over the US, but represented Team USA in Canada this past August for ITU Cross Worlds. I won overall amateur female at the Xterra Southeast Championships in Alabama this past May as well as the overall female winner at Xterra Gator Terra in Arkansas the following month, which doubled as USAT’s off-road Nationals. At Cross Worlds this past August, I placed 2nd in my age group to fellow Colorado 40-44 age group super mom and good friend, Jenn Razee of Vail. We finished 3rd and 5th overall amateur women. Jenn will also be racing in Maui. We truly battle it out on the courses and raise each other’s level of competition, which is exciting. We are both coming into Maui with a great lead-up race this year, Xterra Pan-Am Championships at Snowbasin Resort in Ogden, UT last month. For the 2nd year in a row, I finished 1st and Jenn 2nd overall amateur at the PanAm Champs. While we, and probably a few other athletes as well as our coaches (Jenn is coached by Josiah Middaugh and I am coached by his brother, Yaro), wonder who will cross the finish line 1st, we both will know that because of the other, we are stronger, train harder, and will race with everything we have out there… and give each other great big well-deserved hugs at the finish line. That is what I love about racing Xterra and what keeps pulling me back. At the end of the day, after we all cross the finish line, we celebrate each other, our friendships, and this incredible opportunity and life we share.

Katrina Marks

Katarina Marks, age 25, lives in Durango, CO. I got involved with Xterra triathlons when I got a free entry to a Xterra in my hometown three years ago, I went out, bought a wetsuit and gave it a go! I remember my goggles fogged up so bad that the swim seemed to take forever, the ride was okay- definitely wasn’t trained for it, and then I probably passed about 30 people on the run. It was tough and such a challenge, I think that’s what I enjoyed about it! From that race I qualified for the Xterra USA National Championships and from there, qualified for my first Xterra World Championships. This year will be my third year competing in Xterra World Championships. This year I qualified for Worlds at the Oak Mountain race.


Each year I’ve improved & have had even more fun! My dream is to become a professional Xterra triathlete in the next year. My motivation for competing is that “So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” -1 Corinthians 10:31.


Why triathlon? Most people I talk to, say that they would never do a triathlon because “I could never do the swim.” And I want to encourage others to step outside their comfort zones, try something new, it could spark a new dream, try swimming, etc.! Give something new a try, it’ll be fun!


Colorado Athletes in Kona: Noone and Campbell

Nick Noone


I did my first triathlon when I was twelve years old on a whim, It was called the “YMCA Strong Kids Triathlon” and I only knew it existed because my neighbors were signed up. I did not do another triathlon for a handful of years following that first one as I needed some time to forget about how I almost drowned and threw up simultaneously during the 100 meter swim. As a high school runner and swimmer it was on my radar as a possible progression of my athletic career. At the University of Colorado I raced on the triathlon team for 4 years and solidified my love of the sport. I always said I would never race an Ironman but following  Every Man Jack team camp in February I softened to the idea as it provided a great opportunity to spend more time with my teammates. Later my Dad mentioned he would love to go to Hawaii and I was pretty much sold. A few months later I was on the start line at Ironman Santa Rosa.

Olympic is my favorite distance to race, short and sweet.

This will be my first time racing in Kona and I am super excited to be doing so as a member of the Every Man Jack Triathlon Team

Iain Campbell

Iain started his endurance sports journey back in 2010 during a family vacation to Machu Pichu where he realized that through his focus on a Corporate career that the fitness of his youth had long since dissipated, so started a commitment to fitness and running and in turn Triathlon. Iain now lives in Boulder Colorado where he is Managing Director at the Rocky Mountain Institute, a non-profit working to hasten a transition to a clean energy system. Iain has completed the last 5 Boston Marathons, 5 full Ironman events with his second appearance at Kona coming up in 2017.

303Radio Presents: The Voice of Ironman, Mike Reilly: “Dreams really do come true”

The voice of IRONMAN, Mike Reilly joined 303Radio and shared many stories about why he loves IRONMAN so much. Learn about his respect for the brand, and the athletes. Learn his thoughts on the Colorado culture, living in the moment, and what he his thinking when he sees athletes finishing. Understand his genuine spirit and why you “feel” him when he says, “You are an Ironman” – he really means it! He says there are two keys to success: 1) When “ego is not involved with what they are doing,” and, 2) “How the greatest thing we as people can do is make someone happy.” So much wisdom from Mike on life!

303’s Bill Plock: his triathlon journey, and his lens for reporting on Kona IRONMAN World Championships

Kona was his excuse, now it’s part of is story telling passion

With my hand clasped around the door handle to the gym, I pulled it off and walked away. Inside the other players were warming up for tryouts for a high school basketball team that would eventually be nationally ranked. A team I would’ve made, not played much necessarily, but still it would’ve been a helluva journey. By our senior year, every player was offered some type of scholarship. Instead, I walked the opposite way down the long shiny tiled hall decorated with pictures of all the all-star athletes that had played sports at Wheat Ridge high school. I felt a bit defeated, maybe embarrassed and definitely unsure if I made the right decision. I kept convincing myself I would focus on soccer, a sport I loved too, but not as much as basketball. But at 5’10 I weighed the potential, maybe of playing in college, and chose “my sport.”  I never formally competed in basketball again. I was 16. I had given up my driveway dream of playing for a living, and living my dream – and I had barely learned to drive.

I followed logic, not my heart or my passion, and at some point I discovered this life-changing decision. To this day I believe I would’ve probably ended up at some small junior college trying to “make it” on the court. The butterfly effect of that decision is enormous. What major I chose, what woman I would marry, what child I would have, and on and on. And relative to you, the audience of 303triathlon, you probably would never be reading my thoughts as I travel to cover my third IRONMAN World Championships. The consequences of THAT decision also determined what friends I made, what jobs I chose, and ultimately what sport I would choose to try. It was friends who introduced me to triathlons, and ultimately one friend in particular (who is competing in Kona this year by the way), who in 2010 made me curious enough to try my first IRONMAN, and to understand its madness.

The “decision,” as I refer to my teenage forked path away from basketball, for a while weighed on me as a regret; but as experiences often transform into wisdom, I began to dissect “the decision.” I have concluded that the real regret was being afraid to try. I did make the sophomore team, so there was no reason to think I wouldn’t make the junior team. It wasn’t the failure of not making the team, but maybe it was the failure of not making my dream of the NBA. I probably knew that was almost impossible but was afraid to try. Wisdom also tells me I simply let myself down, and I defied my passion, and my heart. I think from that day forward any time I have ever made a decision that makes me feel like I did that day, it has not worked out for me. I have come to learn that feeling, and it is my compass and has been for over 35 years.

It was that moment in the school hallway, pondering my basketball future, that I have come to appreciate as a moment that has driven my overachieving nature. My never can’t-do attitude. My “chip on my shoulder,” so speak. As years passed and I continued to play hours and hours of pickup basketball and organized soccer until my early 40’s, I began to focus more on cycling as I liked the adventure of it and chance to challenge my strength in new ways. I was always a decent runner, and I learned to swim, and eventually I did my first triathlon in 2008 in Steamboat Springs—an Olympic distance race. In 2010 I did IRONMAN Arizona followed by Cozumel, Canada, Arizona and Boulder three times.

I wrestle with IRONMAN all the time, and that feeling of logic-versus-passion constantly eats at me. Of the seven IRONMANs I have finished, in five of them I had results that left me feeling like I had done well—at least in comparison to others. Two years ago I stepped onto the podium in 5th place in my age group, missing Kona by one spot. I almost made it to Kona as an athlete and I relished the thought of Kona in 2016, but that never happened. I have mixed feelings as to wanting to compete again to try and qualify. I raced an Olympic distance this year for fun, and as I get further from the fitness needed to be at the top in IRONMAN distance, it gets easier and easier to let go of the dream of Kona.

Bill Plock

If I’m really honest with myself, I suppose, I don’t dream of competing in Kona enough right now to endure the effort to get there. I’m fortunate to have the athletic ability to make a few mistakes and still do well with triathlon, but let’s face it, to qualify for Kona takes an almost perfect race and a perfect season of training to go with it. It is tough to qualify— we all know that. But the mental edge needed to push through the pressures of discipline and enduring the time and often the pain that goes with it, separates the contenders from the pretenders, as they say.

Honestly, I think Kona was an excuse more than a goal, at least at first. The journey of my why, my why for even signing up for IRONMAN Arizona in 2009 and ultimately pushing my limits to where I actually had a shot at Kona span a spectrum of motives and reasons.

It began as a curiosity wondering if indeed I could do what my friend had been doing to finish a full distance race.  Training then morphed into a lifestyle that allowed me use training as a partial excuse to hide from other life challenges. But, because I was showing promise, to myself I suppose, I let it rule my life. I think I over-hyped my need to train to avoid some responsibilities and obligations, and I often both ends of the candle. In the wake of my transition from wanna-be-triathlete to age group contender, my marriage blew up and my life took a different course. One of major discovery.  But, I gained perspective and a true appreciation of the sport and once I began to resolve some personal issues, I realized the constant of IRONMAN training, when properly balanced and executed, opened up other doors. I made many friends, and rather than dedicating my existence to “using triathlon” to run away, I embraced it. I reached a new plateau of speed and enjoyment. I loved it so much that I wanted to make my career line up with my passion for training and competition and help inspire others to reach for their dreams and potential.

I had my two best seasons in 2014 and 2015 and came to Kona with a semi-sweet attitude in 2015, feeling like I could so easily be competing and not taking pictures and writing stories. I wasn’t upset, just pulled emotionally in many directions. But I landed at home ready to tear up 2016 and come back to toe the start line. It wasn’t meant to be and my race in Boulder didn’t go as planned. But, I came back to Kona to be a journalist in 2016, and it was in that trip I came to grips to with my dream to race here.

While this race collects the best athletes in the world, it still is just a race. It still hurts; it’s still a lot to prepare for, it’s not cheap and I’m not convinced competing in it, for me anyways, is that much more exciting than celebrating it as a part of the triathlon community.  I love part of the fabric that matters, and my heart is in telling the stories and applying my “why” to the lens I report through.

My hand is firmly gripped on the camera and keyboard and I am opening the door to the gym of possibilities that is my life. I have conquered IRONMAN, I have proved to myself I can compete. Competing here doesn’t make me a better person or even a better athlete. Being here lets me share my wisdom with you. I get the race. I get what the athletes endure. Not racing here doesn’t take away from my ability to see beyond surface of this race.

Someday I may return to racing full distance IRONMANs but only if I want to qualify to be here. For me there is no other reason to try. But right now Kona calls my mind, my eye for photos, and my use of the English language. I’m cool with that. My dream is to be a story teller. That’s what my heart wants to do. Remember, I learned to listen to my heart when I was 16, I’m not gonna stop now.

I offer you this window into my perspective, my journey so that as you read my accounts of this race experience over the next few days you will know where I am coming from!