Feedback Omnium featured in Tiny House

From USA Triathlon

Olympian Katie Zaferes and husband and fellow elite triathlete Tommy built a custom tiny home in Santa Cruz, Calif., this offseason and were featured on the FYI reality show Tiny House Nation on March 25.

Golden, Colorado’s Feedback Sports was featured as the ultra-compact Omnium trainer and folding work stand fit well in small spaces…

When recently-married pro triathletes Katie and Tommy Zaferes daydreamed about their first home together, they didn’t envision a sprawling estate or even a tidy colonial. There were no plans for a tricked-out home gym, an indoor lap pool or soaring walls where they could display their impressive collection of awards from racing around the world. In fact, the couple wanted just the opposite. They wanted a tiny home.

Enter Tiny House Nation, the popular FYI reality show that hooks people up with their very own, custom-designed mini-home. On March 25, the Zaferes’ and their brand-new Santa, Cruz, Calif., house — all 370 square feet of it — were featured on an episode. Here, we caught up with the couple about their stint on reality TV and details about their dainty dwelling.

Read the full article

Watch the full episode: http://www.fyi.tv/shows/tiny-house-nation/season-4/episode-12

Women’s Wednesday: Lisa Ingarfield – equality in sport

Story by Lisa Ingarfield

Equality Delayed is Inequality Accepted

During a drive to Boulder recently to meet up with fellow cyclists for a ride, I learned that the USA national women’s ice hockey team is in negotiations with their national organization, USA Hockey, to ensure their equitable treatment in pay, resources, and coverage. It is 2017, and still, industries and organizations struggle with treating and paying women and men equally. One of the most persistent issues facing women today continues to be pay equity, spanning women’s hourly wages to prize winnings to professional sports teams. Women continue to earn less than men for the same work, with women of color receiving even less than white women. According to a study recently released by the American Association of University Women, if pay rates continue to progress at the pace they are today, then women will not reach parity with men until 2152. 1 Let’s just pause and digest that. Twenty-One- Fifty-Two. One hundred and eighteen years from now.

The women’s hockey team’s requests to USA Hockey go beyond pay equity: “The women say there are pervasive, possibly illegal inequities in how USA Hockey treats male and female players — in terms of equipment, meals, hotel accommodations, staffing, marketing and PR, among other things.” 2 The women’s team (two time World Championship winners and Olympic gold medalists by the way) refused to defend their title and play in the upcoming World Championships unless USA Hockey compensated them equitably. In response to the boycott, instead of addressing what appear to be fairly blatant inequalities between the men’s and women’s teams, USA Hockey decided to ask alternate women hockey players to stand in when the World Championships start this Friday, March 31st in Michigan. 3 Satisfyingly, many of their requests were rebuffed, as the alternates stood in solidarity with the women of Team USA. 4 Fourteen senators, 5 the National Hockey League Players Association, and other major sports players’ unions have also come out in support of the women’s requests for equity, urging USA Hockey to do the right thing. 6 7 After months of negotiation, and 14 days since the team announced their boycott, an agreement was finally reached yesterday.

The experience of the USA women’s hockey team is not unique. We have seen equality requests emerge in other sports such as tennis and soccer. Serena Williams earned over $200,000 less than Roger Federer when they both won a major U.S. tennis tournament, the Western & Southern Open in Mason, Ohio, a few weeks before the U.S. Open in 2015. 8 And while U.S. Tennis is doing marginally better than other sports in terms of addressing gender equity (all Grand Slam tournaments have equal prize purses), comments from players such as Novak Djokovic, that men deserve to be paid more, 9 represent a pervasive, yet unspoken, perspective across many professionals sports.

After the U.S. women’s soccer team won the World Cup in 2015, it was widely publicized that the pay they received was far less than what the men received for not reaching the World Cup final. Justifications abound as to why this was, many resting on how “complicated10 these things are. Couple that with their pay overall, and the picture of gender inequality in sport comes into focus. According to ESPN: “Much of the disparity in wages between the men’s and women’s [soccer] teams stem from the different ways the players are paid. The women earn salaries while the men are paid based on national team appearances, results and other factors.” 11 These “other factors” include the heightened level of air time and sponsorships that men’s soccer receives over women’s; a systemic problem that justifies (for some) the lesser position of women’s sports to men’s across many disciplines.

Several women’s U.S. soccer team members filed a suit with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in March 2016, alleging disparate pay and treatment after losing a case in federal court. The EEOC complaint is still pending. The women’s team is paid about one fourth of what the men’s team receives despite their tremendous success. 12 They have four Olympic gold medals under their belt and three World Cup titles, far more than the men’s team. In fact, the 2015 World Cup final between Japan and the USA was the most watched soccer game ever in U.S. history across both the women and men’s teams. 13 Any argument that women’s soccer is not as “exciting” as men’s is ludicrous given their success. Such an argument rests on false, and sexist, assumptions that women’s sport carte blanche is not as good, entertaining, or captivating as men’s. Frankly, viewer excitement bears no relevancy to the pay the players receive because it does not correlate to the level of work women invest in training and competing at that level. Equal pay for equal work, not equal pay for equal viewership.

Equitable treatment, recognition, and pay has lagged behind for many more women’s teams and athletes. And sadly, the trajectory has been similar for triathlon. Ironman only provides 35 slots to women elites at Kona, versus 50 for men. The hashtag #50womentokona has become a social media rallying cry. Tri Equal, a non-profit organization committed to advocating for equitable treatment and representation of women, has attempted to work with Ironman to rectify this discrepancy. Sadly, efforts have been unsuccessful. This past week, the new Super League Triathlon competition series was launched absent a women’s race. Chris McCormack, an Ironman World Champion who spear-headed the TV friendly initiative shared as justification for the lack of a women’s race that many of the pro-women were off this year because of pregnancy, and that they just had to get going with the event instead of simply talking about it. 14 An unnamed woman Olympian and Ironman podium finisher stated: “there’s enough depth in women’s triathlon that we could have some racing that’s equally compelling to the men’s…I know that I’m not alone in my disappointment in the lack of transparency.” 15

Liz Blatchford, a two time Ironman World Championship podium finisher, shared her frustration on Instagram: “While we have been told women’s racing is coming, I can’t really accept that their SHOWCASE event should have gone ahead without women…I strongly feel that having a women’s event should never have been a negotiable factor.” She rounds out her critique with: “Equality delayed is inequality accepted.” Couldn’t have said it better myself.

We have much work to do. Onwards.

 

Lisa Ingarfield, PhD is a runner, triathlete, and RRCA certified coach. She owns Tri to Defi Coaching and Consulting and provides organizational communication evaluation and consulting services. She is a freelance writer specializing in issues affecting women, particularly in sport and is a member of Vixxen Racing’s 2017 women’s triathlon team.

 

 

  1. http://www.aauw.org/resource/the-simple- truth-about- the-gender- pay-gap/
  2. http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/03/15/520301416/u- s-womens- hockey-team- boycotting-world- championships-to- protest-low- pay
  3. http://www.local10.com/sports/usa-hockey- gave-more- benefits-to- mens-team- than-womens
  4. https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/mar/25/usa-hockey- world-championships- dispute-boycott
  5. http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/325954-senators- call-for- pay-equity- for-us- womens-hockey- team
  6. http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nhl/2017/03/26/american-nhl- players-could- skip-iihl- world- championships/99672342/
  7. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/27/sports/hockey/usahockey-womens- team-boycott.html
  8. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/13/sports/tennis/equal-pay- gender-gap- grand-slam- majors-wta- atp.html
  9. https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/mar/22/serena-williams- andy-murray- novak-djokovic- equal-pay- row- indian-wells
  10. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/22/sports/soccer/usmnt-uswnt- soccer-equal- pay.html
  11. http://www.espn.com/espnw/sports/article/18082886/talks-ongoing- us-soccer- women-team
  12. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/22/sports/soccer/usmnt-uswnt- soccer-equal- pay.html
  13. http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/07/06/420514899/what- people-are- saying-about- the-u- s- women-s- world-cup- win
  14. http://www.triathlete.com/2017/03/lifestyle/super-league- triathlon-awesome- theory-will- work_299827
  15. Ibid.

Monday Masters: SwimLabs joins forces with SafeSplash Swim School

From SafeSplash Swim School

We are so excited to welcome SwimLabs Swim School to our family! SwimLabs’ unique training facilities are indoors, with small, warm-water pools specially designed with 360-degree video feedback technology that lets swimmers of all ages and abilities instantly view their own strokes and compare them against several elite U.S. Olympic swimmers. Check them out at http://www.swimlabs.com/.

Here’s the press release: http://hubs.ly/H06vLT80

2017 Ironman Boulder Bike Course REVEALED

By Bill Plock

Ironman Boulder’s bike course is now THREE loops (passing through the Boulder Reservoir four times!), potentially faster, and should be tons of spectator-friendly fun!

(maps below!)

Ironman continues to refine this course, and after listening to athlete feedback proclaiming they want a more connected and spectator-friendly bike ride, the new course will feature three loops, passing through the reservoir area four times giving racers that extra boost of crowd energy. There, family and friends will be able to cheer and hang out at the beer garden, listen to music, swim in the lake and enjoy the time (and amazing views!) while waiting for their athlete to pass through.

IM Boulder Race Director Tim Brosious and Pro Triathlete Chris Leiferman

Food trucks will be there along with other entertainment and features still being planned. Shuttle buses will run throughout the day for easy transport between the Reservoir and downtown Boulder.

The course could potentially be faster, especially as racers will head east from Highway 36 on St. Vrain road with its nice downhill instead of on Highway 66 like the last three years. The three loops will still utilize most of the same roads as previous years, but on the last lap racers will spend time on a closed Four Mile Creek bike path for a couple of miles before dropping riders onto a few streets heading into T2.

An added plus? No Railroad crossings!

Pro Triathlete, Chris Leiferman, competing this year and who led the group on Saturday, said he “likes the bike path near the end as it’s quiet and will give everyone a chance to stretch out a bit and relax before hitting the run.”

Poppy Sports owner Melanie Mitchell, who isn’t currently signed up, says she is more tempted now after riding the course because, “Three loops mentally seems more attainable than 112 out in the middle of the plains.  Having done the 70.3 it is very familiar territory and training will be easier to ramp up mileage doing loops of the course.

Tim Brosious, the new race director (don’t worry Dave Christen will be around too—he is a regional director now), says, “This is a celebration day not only for the athlete but also for the families, friends, and supporters who have taken on extra responsibilities over the past year to make sure their athlete has a memorable day and crosses the finish line with a sense of fulfillment and pride.

Join the Strava Team Colorado group and get out and practice the loops and see how you stack up with others doing the same.

303Radio podcast featuring North American Race Director Dave Christen and new Ironman Boulder Race Director Tim Brocious, discussing Ironman Boulder features, course preview, and Team Colorado:

Check out all the photos from our 303Radio Podcast HERE.

Here is the official course map!

 

Challenge Regensburg: bucket list European race-cation this summer

Hey U.S. Triathletes – have you ever wanted to try a non-U.S., destination race? Challenge Regensburg, an iron-distance race in Regensburg, Germany, features a stunning host city and surrounding area, and incredibly warm and welcoming Bavarian hospitality. AND, race organizers have put together an incentive package for international athletes with a number of benefits, including an exceptional deal on accommodation (think stay 5 nights/pay for 4, or stay 7 nights/pay for 5—and that’s on top of the already discounted event rate), a dedicated mechanic (to help with those post-travel bike builds), and more.

Want to know more about the race? Check out Colorado industry insider Holly Bennett’s Facebook gallery and write up from last year’s inaugural race. Holly says, “The race organizers are husband and wife team Tom and Sonja Tajsich. Sonja is a beloved professional triathlete who has graced the top 5 podium in Kona and who knows all the important details that make a race athlete-focused and athlete-friendly. Their intense passion for the sport shines through in every detail.”

Register HERE

And use special code IOL-Z99H-F1AR-SSBB for the International Athlete Program.

More notes from Holly if you want to include: “I know a lot of people are nervous about racing internationally, or they don’t want to deal with long flights and the hassles of traveling with a bike. That’s why this race is really perfect for them. Munich is a direct flight from many US cities (including Denver), and then it’s just a short drive to Regensburg (1.5 hrs). With a dedicated mechanic for international athletes, there’s no need to worry if you don’t feel confident putting your bike back together yourself, or if you just want to be sure there’s someone convenient to give it a once over. And the hotel deal is fantastic—the rates are really affordable and include breakfast & wifi, plus you get the extra night(s) free, and the hotels are right in the city center, walking distance to nearly everything. Plus, Challenge race entries are far more affordable than IM!”

2017 Triathlon Business International – Day 2, Lance Armstrong

Basketball… “Flat, Challenging” times in Tri … and Lance Armstrong:
“I went from the stars to the ground, seemingly overnight”

The Monday morning start of Day 2 at TBI began early, with a group workout at the local Dallas YMCA, put on by ACTIVE. Following an old-school basketball lay-up drill, Arch led participants through four, 7-minute “Tabata” sets and had us all sweating and dreading sitting on sore glutes later in the day, but smiling goofy endorphin-induced grins. (Only the first three sets were physical – the fourth set was a mental “Triku” writing exercise… we may – or may not – hear more about those submissions later in the conference.)

By 8:00 a.m. the breakfast crowd was ushered into the presentation hall for a few opening remarks by TBI President Richard AdlerCiting registration data, Adler pointed out 41% of this year’s TBE attendees are race producers, followed by those in the technology field, and manufacturers with 15% each. And then a large “other” category, that includes coaches, tri clubs, city representatives, advertising/marketing entities, sponsors… a good cross-section of the industry.

This year’s conference theme is “profitability and success in triathlon,” and Adler referenced data presented by Gary Roethenbaugh yesterday and reiterating the current “flat” triathlon climate makes for “challenging times.” However. The entire purpose of this conference is to collaborate and share ideas; TBI is, at its core, a “sounding board and connector of resources.”

And then a hush fell over the room as Lance Armstrong was ushered down the center aisle, red carpet style, haloed by a bright spotlight, led by Slowtwitch publisher Dan Empfield. As they walked Empfield referred to Armstrong as his “very good friend,” and Armstrong made reference to Empfield being his “first sponsor” (Empfield was Lance Armstrong’s first bike sponsor, with Quintana Roo, the bike brand Empfield founded).

Empfield opened the session with an air of caution and assertive direction, launching immediately into Armstrong’s The Forward Podcast, and skipping any preamble about the cycling world or doping or other obvious precursors. Admitting he is “very jealous” of Armstrong’s podcasts because “they are so good,” Empfield asked about:

  • Most recent guest (astrophysicist Neil Degrass Tyson – whom Armstrong pointed out is “Stephen Colbert‘s favorite guest”)
  • Toughest interviews (“Seal was very emotional and dark; he and I did the dance and it came off…“)
  • Favorite interview to date (Michael Morton – wrongfully convicted for killing his wife: “He is my favorite by far, so far. He went to prison for 26 years for a crime he didn’t commit. And then DNA evidence proved his innocence and he was exonerated. His views on the people who put him away – what he wanted to do to them – for 15 years he had a plan for every one of them. Shoot & bury. Burn. Drown… And then he found God. . . The guy is amazing. Really cool guy.

As Armstrong mentioned Sean Penn (whom he hangs out with in Aspen), biographer Hunter Thompson, Johnny Depp, Bo Jackson, Brett Favre (a “good friend”), Malcolm Gladwell (If he does a tri, “Who’s going to make the swim cap to go over that ‘fro of his?”) … Empfield points out, “These guys are all friends – you just call them up.” And later in the interview, regarding Armstrong’s residence in Aspen, “there’s a posse, and you’re in it.” Empfield continues, “You can hang with these people and talk with these people in a way a CNN interviewer couldn’t… I mean, a presidential historian and rock stars…”

Armstrong revealed his techniques for landing an interview with someone he finds compelling: “I grab coffee in the morning and read the newspaper. I see who’s in town… send a DM to a mutual acquaintance and get a cell phone number…” He goes on to point out how public most personal information is, saying, “You can find out about anybody’s life – start with Wikipedia, and then go to YouTube… There’s still some secrets out there, but very few.”

He also acknowledges the timing of his Forward podcast, saying, “I couldn’t have done this kind of platform five years ago. . . I went from the stars to the ground seemingly overnight, and all of my platforms went away. That was a humbling experience. The podcast is my first platform, my first offensive move, the first place I’ve gone back to to give people a place to go. . . I’m blown away at the success it’s had.”

When asked about the “corporatization” of sport, making big business out of triathlon or other endurance sports, he was clear, saying whether it’s Ironman or New York Road Runners or the Boston Marathon, “we still have millions willing to pay to play.” But. ASO/Tour de France is “much more evil” than Wanda Sports. “The business model of pro cycling is 100 years old and not sustainable. There is turmoil there. They want to control as much as they can and cast a shadow over all the other events. The Tour is too big – but they are the only one, and the only thing people care about.”

“I wish there were more players and riders who had a bigger voice in pro cycling.”

Armstrong’s latest venture, WEDU Sport, was touched on but not well defined. According to the trademark application, WEDU will incorporate monitoring & tracking (“Computer software and computer application software related to tracking, monitoring, planning, compliance and motivation”), clothing, and “athletic competitions, triathlon events, athletic coaching services.”

When Empfield asked about the new brand, Armstrong provided an explanation for the name, saying, “WEDU is an answer to a question: Who does 100X100’s in the pool or runs Rim2Rim? Who wants to do that? Who would be crazy enough to do that? The answer is WEDU. That is the brand. There is space for more events in the endurance world. Also, monitoring and tracking – GPS, Strava, wearables – allowing athletes to train better, smarter, and injury free.”

Later in the interview he added on the subject of WEDU: “We’ll provide events, content, and training. Similar to Endurance Nation – we’ll sell plans. And WEDU may be an app.”

And what about that subject of doping? Empfield raised the subject, and Armstrong elaborated, saying first, “It will never change.” He said there will always be cheaters Whether traditional doping, or course cutting, or mechanical doping with engines. He did an obstacle course race, and when he missed an obstacle he had to do 180 burpees. “I did all 180 burpees,” he said. “But how many people really do them? It’s the honor system. If they have to do 30 burpees, how many do 30? No one. They do 22.”

What about just letting letting drug testing go – just “chilling” – and letting athletes do what they will do? “Just chilling is not an option,” Armstrong insists. “I don’t have a lot of credibility on this.” (crowd chuckles) “You laugh, but it’s true. Should we test athletes? I’m probably not the guy to ask. But if it’s my kids, I say test them.”

And, on the future of triathlon: “Who knows? Who would have thought there would be the Tough Mudder and events like that? We just don’t know… You never know what the next event is. What will provide relevance and motivation? For Type A motivated people, what are you going to give them in ten years?”

He speaks about the return of his Aspen mountain bike race in 2017 (the 2016 event ended up being “a party at my house” since he missed the permitting deadline), his preference for century rides over Gran Fondo’s, because they are untimed and easier to permit, and “alternative” events in general. He then adds, solemnly, “I want all of the ships to rise.”

Also: Jimmy Buffett & Margaritaville. “When you stay there, he is making money off of you from the minute you wake up until you go to bed. From music to blenders to everything… I really respect what he’s done with his brand.”

Finally: Empfield circles back to the Forward podcast. He notes that listeners are asked to rate the show, one star to five. “There are no 2s, 3s or 4s. Only 1s and 5s. Is this a metaphor for how people view you?” Armstrong responds, “I was an asshole for a very long time. I understand that.”

As Armstrong left the room (for 1.5 hrs of post-appearance interviews in the outer hallway), the TBI sessions continued with discussions covering the Future of Triathlon (“Triathlon has plateaued. But it’s stable. Flat is the new ‘up’.” – Chuck Menke); Sponsorships; Diversity in Triathlon moderated by Sara Gross (“Diversity brings innovation, and that’s what triathlon needs now”); and the USAT State of the Union address by Rob Urbach (which began with, “Do you remember the first time you made love?”). Late afternoon sessions allowed participants to choose between topics including Working with Municipalities, Retailer Relationships, Understanding Millennials, and Triathlon Teams.

The Ron Smith Reception and Awards Celebration filled the evening, with winners announced in multiple categories. Be sure to check out 303Triathlon’s twitter feed for all the details on the day’s presentations and events.

 

Mid-Week Fun: Callum Millward’s Top Tweets from Kona

Hopefully enough time has passed that even those who had a rough day in Kona are able to look back with a sense of humor. Here’s just a small taste of Callum Millward’s take on the day… click at the bottom to see the entire collection. You’ll be glad you did.

Continuing my tradition of Kona race day tweets, I recapped the highlights from this years race. Enjoy.

sunblock1avacado1 heartattack1

bart1

Read the full article

Kona Digest: 7-Day Recap

Here’s a recap of all the Kona news produced by 303 over the last several days…

60-secondsWe’ve filmed & produced daily videos featuring

We continue to share many Colorado athlete profiles – 17 so far! Be sure to check out the complete list of all Colorado athletes competing.

We’ve explored the “why” behind so many athletes from Colorado achieving World Championship status.

We’ve produced many Facebook Live newscasts, including:

  • The Keiki Dip-N-Dash – Part I
  • Keiki Dip-N-Dash – Part II (older kids)

We compiled a solid list of swim tips, with an exclusive introductory video by the Voice of Ironman, Mike Reilly.

teamWe took selfies, went swimming, and had a laughter-filled dinner with Famous Dave, Ironman Boulder Race Director and North American Regional Director Dave Christen…

And the celebrity sightings are too numerous to count (be sure to check out our Facebook album for this one!)

We tried out new gadgets like power meters, and attended the Stryd Running Panel, moderated by the famous Bob Babbitt…

bags

 

 

We handed out generous gift bags to dozens of Colorado athletes (with many more hand-offs scheduled for tomorrow morning!) – all made possible by generous Colorado company sponsors.

 

 

 

 

Here’s a fun video interview explaining all about our gift bags and introducing the 303 Team:
parade

We attended the “Heroes of Hawai’i” ceremony and and observed the long-standing tradition of the Parade of Nations… which included some very clever team messaging!

 

 

 

 

waemea

We went running in the beautiful mountain town of Waemea and enjoyed a break from the relentless heat…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This afternoon Rinny held a press conference and 303’s questions were featured…How do you come back mentally from last year’s DNF, and what did you learn from it? (at minute 12:00) and Why do you love living and training in Boulder? (at minute 22:00).

Write ups on the Cobb Saddles Women’s event, the unveiling of the new Cervelo P5X, a ride-along with Ventum Bikes – all in the works. And the crew is still out attending Tim O’Donnell’s CLIFF party, and the Training Peaks Party! Those stories, and MANY more coming your way yet this week. Stay tuned!

Kona- Dig Me Beach Swim Tips

JUST ADDED:

Top Tips straight from The Voice of Ironman, Mike Reilly!

303-swimFor most arriving on the Big Island of triathlon dreams, the time-lapsed days begin pre-dawn, and lines of athletes show up at Dig Me Beach ready for a practice swim as soon as the sun breaks the horizon.

The mainlanders among us are usually done with our coffee by 4:00 a.m., waiting until it is light enough to jog down Ali’i Drive (enjoying the oxygen rich air) to join the crowd filing in to the water.

There is something  magical about stepping in to the waters off of ‘the pier’ in Kailua Bay. Located on Ali’i Drive in front of the King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel – which serves as Ironman headquarters and athlete packet pickup – there is always a group of swim spectators sitting atop the sea wall. Walking through the silty-sand of the gentle beach, the water is welcoming, enveloping you in her warm current, salty buoyancy, and un-thrashing ways.

However. In the chaos of Ironman World Championships Race Week, some human-powered thrashing may be had. Thus, here are some swim tips for pre-race swims:

  1. You may check belongings at the Ironman tent in front of the hotel from 6:30-9:00 a.m. each morning. This is strongly recommended. They also provide water and Gatorade. Please note the end time – you need to collect your bag no later than 9:00.
  2. Be sure to lube up with sunscreen, anti-chafe, and plenty of lip balm. The sun and saltwater really expose all your skin’s vulnerabilities.
  3. Safety kayakers are on the course each day 6:30-9:30 – take a moment to tread water, take in the view, and thank them for their help. (If you swim with your GoPro or waterproof camera tucked into your suit, the kayakers will take your picture!)
  4. Kayaker Jan, who lives here on the island, told us this year’s practice swim course is slightly crooked at the beginning – follow the buoys to avoid lava rock and coral near the shore, and all the boats in the bay. It’s really important to stay on the shore-side of the buoys to remain out of boat paths.
  5. Kayaker John, who traveled all the way from New York to volunteer as a safety kayaker and also cheer on a handful of athletes he coaches, advises keeping an eye out for sea life. On Monday, he spotted a large sea turtle just 100 yards from shore!
  6. 303’s Nicole Odell recommends visualizing that it’s race day and you are feeling good – try to feel any nerves that you might have on race morning melt away.
  7. Site Site Site. There are several traffic rules working concurrently during the practice swims. Always swim in a clockwise pattern. And always swim in a counter-clockwise pattern. Always pass left shoulder to left shoulder. Oh, and always pass right-to-right. In other words, near-head-on collisions are just part of the experience. It is a good day if you lift your head every couple strokes, and have several close calls… with no actual head bumps.
  8. The Coffee Bar!

    Since 2008, Coffees of Hawaii has commandeered the Floating Espresso Bar anchored just a few hundred meters off-shore. From 7-9 a.m., Tuesday thru Friday you can swim up to the boat and enjoy complimentary cups of their coffee.

    This is a great social experience, and a way to hang out and tread water with athletes from literally all over the world. Keep in mind the coffee is HOT, and can be a little rough on raw, salty lips…

  9. Get the feel of the swells – if you are drifting to one direction, try over-correcting a bit with your stroke. If you are new to ocean swimming, becoming accustomed to the rolling feel of the currents is important before race day.
  10. Swim early and swim often. Swim early for “flatter” water and smaller swells. Swim often because it’s HAWAII! Make the most of it!