Tri Coach Tuesday: Do You Need More Protein?

from Infinit Nutrition

Protein is an essential nutrient that is present in every cell of the body and is critical to supporting athletic training. Protein is responsible for building and maintaining muscles, and is what makes up the enzymes that power all reactions in your body that keep you going.

Proteins are made of amino acids, which are building blocks that help grow and maintain the body’s tissues. Humans are not able to synthesize (or produce internally) certain amino acids, so they need to be consumed through food. The amino acids that need to come from dietary sources are called essential amino acids.1 This inability to produce essential amino acids is why the consumption of an adequate amount of high quality protein is vital for your health, epecially as athletes. 

It is recommended that average adults get a minimum of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day.3 Athletes, on the other hand, should consume higher amounts due to increased needs for muscle repair and training adaptations. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends 1.2 to 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day for athletes, depending on training intensity.4 If you’re not consuming enough protein, your body may be giving you different signs that you need to eat more of it. Some signs that you can look for are decreased muscle growth or strength, getting sick more often, hunger, fatigue, unhealthy hair, skin, and nails, neurological disruptions, and swelling.

1. You can’t seem to build muscle 

Do you feel like you’re not getting the results that you want? You may not be consuming enough protein for muscle growth. When you don’t get enough protein in your diet, your body will start to take it from other sources. Primarily, it will take protein from your muscles. This will cause muscle wasting and decreased strength.2 In order to provide the optimal amount of protein and amino acids to allow your muscles to recover and build, protein intake should be spaced throughout the day and after workouts.4

2. You’re getting sick more often

Are you getting sick more often than you have in the past? You could have a weakened immune system due to lack of protein in your diet. Protein is needed for the creation of antibodies, which are proteins that fight off diseases caused by pathogens that enter the body. Lack of protein can reduce the number of antibodies in your blood which can leave you defenseless to different pathogens.2

Complete Article on Infinit Nuttition HERE

Racing for a Future Without Cancer

Brett Kessler

Brett Kessler was helping blood cancer patients long before it became personal. He did an oncology fellowship after dental school where his focus was on treating patients affected by blood cancer. Then, he moved to Colorado in 1999 and joined The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society‘s (LLS) Team In Training to meet new people, train and raise money for blood cancer research. He then went on to be a triathlon coach for the program.

Brett shared, “I did not treat this population anymore and still wanted to support them. I was hooked.”

Brett’s mom was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) eight years later. She took imatinib (Gleevac®) through clinical trials which were funded by LLS. Sadly, Brett’s mom passed away in 2016.

He shared, “I felt like I directly contributed to her care from the work I did with LLS. The universe works in amazing ways as Gleevec was not even approved when I started with Team In Training.”

The fundraising Brett has done for the LLS mission through Team In Training is in memory of his mom but is giving hope to future patients through the efforts of local researchers.

The work of Dr. Dan Pollyea and his team of clinical researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine is funded by grants such as those from LLS. Three years ago, the team began a clinical trial program for the first therapy that could effectively eradicate leukemia stem cell populations. Dr. Pollyea shared that if you can really eradicate the leukemia stem cells, then you can potentially cure this disease. The results so far have been described as “unbelievable” because they can get 80-90% of people into complete remission with their approach.

Dr. James DeGregori

The work of Dr. James DeGregori at the University of Colorado School of Medicine has also been funded by LLS. He is researching how the human body ages and its effects on how cancer cells find a way to take hold. He is looking at how can we mitigate those changes and interfere with cancer growth with clinical intervention. Dr. DeGregori’s team has done some work on mice to reduce cancer incidences but will they will be approaching their work with humans a bit differently when the time comes.

“As a practicing dentist in Denver, several of my patients have had various forms of blood cancers,” shared Brett. “Knowing that we have some of the best treatments available here in Denver due to the research of people like Dr. Pollyea and Dr. DeGregori makes me feel good that they have a chance to beat this awful disease. Twenty-five years ago, many of these diagnoses were a death sentence. Now they are manageable.”

The success of local researchers continues to inspire Brett. He earned a coveted spot in the 2018 IRONMAN® World Championship event in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, crossing the finish line this past October. He is still raising funds for this event and has raised $67,000 and counting in memory of his mom.

“This is an emotional journey for me,” shared Brett. “I am able to honor my mom by bringing awareness and raising money to help eradicate blood cancers. I am also able to honor the many people who are connected to the disease that I have met along the way.”

Team In Training is the world’s largest and most successful endurance sports fundraising and training program. Since its inception in 1988, Team In Training has raised more than $1.5 billion, trained more than 650,000 people and helped LLS invest more than $1.2 billion in blood cancer research.

Team In Training offers a lineup of innovative high caliber domestic and international events, and prepares teammates for marathons, half marathons, and triathlons, as well as cycling, climbing and hiking experiences, with experienced coaches, training resources, a supportive community and world-class fundraising tools.

Join the team for the Lavaman Waikoloa Triathlon or the Wildflower Experience. To learn more, click here. Use code TRI303 for free Team In Training registration ($100 value, expires 12/31/18).

30 DAYS TO KONA – Friday Fun – Khem’s Spectathlete Must Haves!

Khem’s Spectathlete Must-Haves

We all know that spectating at a race, especially a long-distance one like IRONMAN, can be an endurance sport in itself. There’s nothing worse than trying to capture those special moments when your athlete rolls by and your smartphone is dead. So after many years of supporting athletes and working behind the fences at various races, I’ve found some must have items to add to your race-sherpa toolbox! Race day tested, Khem approved!

 


Cairn™ Lantern + Power Bank & Neve® Lightning Cable

What’s one of the biggest frustrations of being a race Sherpa? Dead phone? Tangled up lightning cable? Well, the folks at Lander have developed a handful of products that bridge the gap between the outdoors and technology. I’ve been lucky enough to give a few of their products a whirl, and I will tell you, I am thoroughly impressed.

The Cairn™ Lantern + Power Bank is exactly what it is. A lantern and power bank in one. It has a built-in multi-axis lanyard, allowing you to attach the light wherever you need it. The stitching in the lanyard, Illumifind™, is reflective and makes it easy to find in the dark. Just shine a light and it pops out! Want to take it to the next level? Their Cairn™ XL Smart Lantern is Bluetooth compatible. Via the free Cairn XL app, you can control power, dimming, color, light alarms, proximity lighting, battery settings, and light strobe.

Well, what’s the use of having a power bank if you don’t any cables? Lander outdid themselves with the Neve®Lightning Cable. Available in Lightning to USB, micro-USB, USB-C, and lengths of 3 feet or 10. Yep, 10 feet of charging bliss!!! Like their power banks, the cables feature the signature Illumiweave® reflective technology that makes it easy to find in the dark. They are also made of nylon in a flat, tangle-free design and long Everpull® connectors, avoiding breakage where most cables fail. Their lifetime warranty also stacks up to their claim that you’ll never need to buy a new cable. My cable has seen a fair amount of action with all the travel and race spectating, and so far I’m giving it a two thumbs up!

 


myCharge

Ever in a spot where you need an outlet and there’s none to be found? I have for sure!!! The myCharge Portable Power Outlet is a great solution for all those “need to plug in the wall” electronics. This device also has two USB-A ports and one USB-C port, so it’s like having a mini-generator and power bank in one device. Fully charged, there’s enough juice to run a 34-inch LED TV for up to four hours and the power bank recharges 50% faster than its competitors.

The easy to read light up screen tells you how much juice is left in the unit and the output of power, USB or power outlet. The durable rubber-like casing protects the myCharge from dings and scratches – no need to worry if it accidently gets knocked off the table. During long-haul flights or airport gate areas where power outlets are either scarce or non-existent, the myCharge Portable Power Outlet has kept my laptop and other electronics fired up so I don’t miss a beat! Definitely worth the investment if you aren’t not quite ready for going totally off the grid or have a plethora of electronic devices to charge up while your athlete is out racing!

 


Edifier MP100 Mini Bluetooth Speaker

As an athlete, I will tell you that hearing awesome tunes as you’re running by is such a great pick-me-up. As a spectathlete, it’s a great way to rally others around you and keep the energy high throughout a race. The Edifier MP100 Mini Bluetooth Speaker was a great companion while I was kayaking across Skaha Lake during the most recent Ultra 520K Canada race. The splash proof exterior ensured I had tunes regardless if the waves started to kick up. The clip at the top of the speaker made it easy to latch onto wherever I needed it. I was also impressed by the sound quality, and at times had to turn down the volume because it packs quite the punch. I also took it with me skiing, and through my pockets I could hear my music crystal clear. The speaker also doubles as a speakerphone so you can take calls hands free and keep on about your business.

 


The Tinkle Belle

I know what you all are thinking, but sometimes you’re stuck out in the middle of nowhere and nature decides to call…and for us ladies, squatting sometimes can be inconvenient. The Tinkle Belle is ergonomically design to fit the female undercarriage, minimizing the chance for leaks and splash backs. It also comes with a handy case that is waterproof lined just in the event there are a few drops left, and attached with a small carabiner making it super easy to transport. A few months ago at a pre-race briefing, when asked if there would be porto-potties along the course, the race director kindly responded with “You have 520km of bathroom at your disposal.” Disclaimer: Don’t use on private property and be discreet. Just because your friend/brother/boyfriend/husband pees in whatever corner they wish, doesn’t mean it’s okay…but pee freely standing up ladies!!

 

 


All these spectathlete must-haves (and more) will be making their way to Kona for the IRONMAN World Championship in my luggage. If you’re curious as to what other goodies will make the trip, feel free to reach out via email at khem@303colorado.com or comment on this article’s 303Triathlon Facebook post. See y’all on the Big Island!! Aloha!!

 


Khem Suthiwan is a staff content editor/media correspondent with 303 Endurance Network, a triathlete, triathlon coach with Mile High Multisport, IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador Athlete, member of the Palmares Racing Cycling Team, avid skier, SCUBA diver, finisher of the 2015 IRONMAN World Championship, and a Colorado resident since January 2001.

Get to Know our 2018 Team Colorado Kona Athletes

BRETT KESSLER

*What kind of bike do you ride? Blue-Triad SL (black with yellow)

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? I got in through a charity slot with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training. I coached with them from 2002 -2010. My qualifying race was the Hanu Half IM in June.

*How many Ironman races have you done? This will be my first IM.

*How many times have you raced Kona? Hanu Half…

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about? Surfing!!!!!

*What is your favorite bike training route? I have been riding the windy rolling hills between Aurora Sports Park and Bennett, CO….

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? Anything I can get in my mouth!

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? The overwhelming amount of support from my patients ( I am a dentist), community, colleagues, family and friends.

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? I am pulling from Merideth Kessler (namesake, but no relation). Not sure about the men’s race.

Here is an article that brings together why I am doing this race/fundraiser.

Cancer Breakthroughs

 

JEFFREY LAMPE

*What kind of bike do you ride? Red Felt IA16

*Where did you qualify for the Ironman World Championships? For me Qualifying was a little different being part of the Physically Challenged Division Lottery. First my name was chosen, next I had to complete 1 half Iron. I did two one in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho and another in Boulder CO.

*How many Ironman races have you done? At this point 2 70.3 races, no fulls.

*How many times have you raced Kona? First Time

*What is your favorite non-race activity on the Big Island – if you have not been – what non-race activity are you most excited about? I am excited to try out surfing and to see a volcano.

*What is your favorite bike training route? I like to ride from Boulder, CO up around Carter lake down the North Side and up to Masonville, then Back to Boulder.

*What is your favorite post workout/post race treat? Either a chocolate Shake and/ or a cheeseburger from Five Guys.

*What was one unexpected occurrence on your path to Kona? 4 Flat tires in Coure D’ Alene, and basically going to Kona all together.

*Who do you think will win the pro men’s and women’s races this year? I honestly can’t say but I have met a few this year at the Boulder Reservoir or in Colorado Multisport shop, all were willing to help me out, truly amazing group of people from this sport!

Middaugh, Paterson win XTERRA Pan Am Championship

Josiah Middaugh from Eagle-Vail, Colorado and Lesley Paterson from Scotland captured the 15th annual XTERRA Pan American off-road triathlon elite titles on a beautiful morning at Snowbasin Resort near Ogden, Utah on Saturday, September 15, 2018.

It’s the third win in four years for Middaugh at this race, and the second in a row for Paterson. Both have now won the championship in Utah four times in their careers.

More than 500 athletes from 30 countries took part in the event, which was the culmination of a 12-stop series of off-road triathlons spanning South and Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean, Canada, and the U.S.

The challenge started with a one-mile swim in Pineview Reservoir (4,900-feet elevation), followed with an 18-mile mountain bike leg that climbed more than 3,000-feet to the top of Sardine Peak (7,300-feet elevation) and culminated with a 7-mile trail run featuring another 700-feet of climbing on trails in the Wasatch Range.

In the men’s elite race Middaugh came out of the water less than one-minute behind the leaders, took the lead from South Africa’s Bradley Weiss at about mile eight on the bike, and took the tape in 2:26:34. Weiss finished second in 2:30:32, and Sam Long from Boulder, Colorado was third in 2:31:18.

One of the race favorites, 2016 XTERRA World Champion Mauricio Mendez, had to drop out during the mountain bike section due to a broken saddle on his bike that couldn’t be repaired.

Brad Zoller had the fastest swim of the day, but Mendez was second out of the water and was charging hard on the bike. Branden Rakita was next, followed by Ian King, Brad Weiss, Karsten Madsen, and Middaugh, who interestingly, didn’t know Mendez was out of the race.

“Going up Wheeler, Brad Weiss was riding off the front and Karsten was riding really well,” said Middaugh. “I caught them both and couldn’t see Mauricio. I thought he was a good minute or two ahead of me up the trail. I thought I was having a really bad day.”

It wasn’t until after the bike-to-run transition that Middaugh realized he was in the lead.

Read the entire article here.

Tri Coach Tuesday: Making Hard Workouts Easy (Or At Least Easier)

by Will Murray, D3 Multisport Mental Skills Coach

 

When your brain senses pain, it says to itself, “Bad. Make it stop.” When you are doing high-intensity workouts, your brain says, “Pain. Bad. Make it stop.” But you do hard workouts for a reason—they really, really work to make you fitter, stronger and faster.

One easy way to increase the benefit of your high-intensity workouts is to bring your brain along with you. When your brain understands the purpose of these workouts, the benefits of the workouts and what these workouts look like, this brain of yours will help you and stop trying to get you to stop.

 

Here’s how to do it.

1. **State the purpose of your workout.** If it’s a high-intensity workout intending to raise your upper limit (VO2max), state that. If it’s a recovery workout, say that.
2. **State the benefit of this workout to you.** A high-intensity workout brings you benefit by raising your lactate threshold, improving your VO2max, even recruiting mitochondria, the powerhouses of your cells. A recovery workout helps by mobilizing and clearing metabolic products from previous workouts and preparing you for future workouts.
3. **Rehearse your perfect workout.** Make a movie in your mind’s eye, seeing yourself over there, watching a movie of yourself doing your workout. This “seeing yourself over there” is called a dissociated perspective. The key is the perfect movie, just as you want and intend your workout to go. If you hit any snags, stop the movie, back it up, make it perfect, then run it to the end. You are the director of this movie—direct it to be just as you wish it to go.
4. **Rehearse your workout again**, this time seen through your own eyes and feeling it in your own skin (this is called an associated perspective). Once again, make the movie go perfectly, just as you wish it would go.
5. **Make one more perfect movie, in fast motion.** The entire movie should take only five seconds.

 

How does this work?

First, your brain is really good at seeing patterns. It looks for patterns, just as a good golden retriever looks for what you toss at it to retrieve it. So, when you explain to your brain the purpose and benefits of the workout, your brain looks for those things.

Second, there is an area of your brain that stores memories of events that haven’t happened yet (this area is called Brodmann’s Area). You can install a future memory in this area of your brain of exactly what you want to happen in your workout, and that future memory is what your brain is looking for. Therefore, it isn’t surprised by the discomfort of a hard workout, it sees it as desirable. Instead of objecting to the pain, it expects it.

That’s it. The whole five-step process, once you have practiced it two or three times, will take you less than one minute, maybe even half that. And it will recruit your brain to help you do your workout as prescribed, and once and for all eliminate all the negotiations and objections of your mind when you are doing your perfect workouts. Do this process before every single workout and before every race, and soon it will become as automatic as rinsing your swim goggles, buckling your bike helmet or lacing up your running shoes.

Weekend Preview: 38th Annual Longmont Triathlon

Triathlon Events

Saturday June 2nd

 

Colorado Triathlon – SOLD OUT

Boulder


14th Annual Longmont Kids Triathlon & Try-a-Tri

Longmont


Little Bellas MTB Camp

Lakewood


FoCo Kids Triathlon

Ft. Collins


Grant Ranch OWS

Lakewood


Sunday June 3rd

 

38th Annual Longmont Triathlon

Longmont


Boulder.Bike.Bolder,: Rachel Joyce & Dana Platin Bike Clinic

Boulder


9th Annual Beti Bike Bash

Lakewood


Little Bellas MTB Clinic

Lakewood


Grant Ranch OWS

Lakewood



Cycling Events

Saturday June 2nd

 

Palisade Gran Fondo

Palisade


Colorado Bike Expo @ ERock

Castle Rock


Beti Bike Bash

Lakewood


ERock Sunrise Sunset

Castle Rock


20th Annual Buena Vista Bike Fest

Buena Vista


47th Annual Fred Prindle Memorial City park Criterium

Denver


Firebird XC

Eagle


Burning Can Fest

Lyons


Little Bella MTB Camp

Lakewood


BVV Saturday Sprints

Erie


Dirty Kanza

Emporia, KS


Sunday June 3rd

 

Guanella Pass Hill Climb & Gran Fondo

Georgetown


Grand Enduro

Grand Junction


Little Bella MTB Camp

Lakewood


9th Annual Beti Bike Bash

Lakewood


Elephant Rock ride

Castle Rock


Colorado Bike Expo @ ERock

Castle Rock

 

Bolder Boulder celebrates 40 years of city’s iconic race

40 Years Bold,” a new book produced by the Daily Camera and the Bolder Boulder, celebrates 40 years of Boulder’s iconic 10K race.

From the Daily Camera

The cover of the new book about the history of the Bolder Boulder, “40 Years Bold,” captures well the spirit of this iconic 10K road race that will weave its way through the streets of Boulder for the 40th time on Memorial Day.

Daily Camera photographer Jeremy Papasso’s picture shows the packed start of the A wave of the 2014 Bolder Boulder.

Sprinting off the line, smiles on their faces, are some young, high school runners, caught in midstride. In the lead is a fitlooking runner in a Batman costume. Another costumed runner is to his left, while just behind them is a female A wave runner. Over on the left side of the start is a masters runner.

Behind them, filling the cover, is a mass of densely packed runners of varying shapes and sizes. Here we see the competitiveness and size of the Bolder Boulder — surely no other race has as many fast runners in front.

Behind these fast runners, as the book shows, come some of the tens of thousands of other runners and walkers, friends and family, who follow the A wavers into the Folsom Field finish. These are some of the ingredients that make the Bolder Boulder an integral part of Boulder, a rite of spring that many of us run, walk, volunteer at or simply watch.

Then there is the book title: “40 Years Bold.” Appropriate, for the Bolder Boulder has long been bold and innovative in making changes and setting the tone for the Running Boom, which was in its infancy in that first Bolder back in 1979.

Read the full story