The Colorado Marathon/Half Marathon: Poudre Ponderings

By Dana Willett

I was wide awake when my alarm chirped at 3:00 a.m. on Sunday morning. Normally, early morning race routines start with a belly full of adrenaline and pre-race nerves, but not today. The Colorado half marathon “fit nicely” into my seasonal training plan, according to my coach of nine years, Craig Howie. Like always, life has intervened this spring and I missed some key workouts and cut others short… so my goals for this run were not so much to try to beat previous records, but to run a smart race, a solid race – one that would anchor my season.

Even though the performance pressure was off on paper and in my brain, my heart still wanted to do well, which is the reason I continue to toe the run/bike/triathlon line year over year. Life in my 50’s has taught me that while my endurance remains, I just don’t have the leg speed I had 5-6-7 years ago. OK, even three years ago…

So I popped out of bed, fresh and clear-headed from skipping my nightly wine for the last several days, and went through my routine. Stand-alone run events are so EASY to pack for! No bike or wetsuit or long list of gear! The 45 minute drive north to Fort Collins was quiet and dark.

After parking, a quick walk across the street brought me to the waiting buses – race organizers really have this routine dialed in, and everything moved smoothly. While in line I met a woman with a bike who was pacing the lead female. Her name was Mandy, and I really enjoyed talking with her and learning how she came to be in that role. A multi-Ironman finisher, seasoned athlete, mother and wife, she exuded what I love about our community: a genuine positive nature, willingness to help others, gratitude for all the outdoor beauty.

A 20-minute bus ride took us up the mountain canyon to our staging area, where familiar signs of porta-potty lines and crowds of blanket-clad runners huddled together for warmth in the dark. I stood aside and watch the golden sunrise hit the surrounding mountaintops, as the Poudre River gurgled in the background, and I felt so satisfied that I’d made the effort to get to this race. As the bullhorn guided us to the narrow start line, and a sole bugle played the Star Spangled Banner, a blanket of cloud cover covered the sky, securing cool, mild temperatures in the low 60s for the duration of the race.

The first few miles of downhill sped by and it’s always hard in this section to manage the effort because you don’t want to go to fast and trash your quads, but you also want to take advantage of the downhill. I hear Coach Craig’s voice in my head – “soft knees, quick turnover, it should feel too easy…” In no time we were at mile 5.5 and the steep uphill… this is where the first fast-starters gave in to walking and all those people who passed me earlier were now slowing down. Just after the crest of the hill movement to my left caught my eye – a beautiful Paint mare was cantering along the fence line parallel to us, her spunky chestnut foal at her heels… they seemed so happy and celebratory! With the second half – and toughest part of the run course – still to come, this was a good reminder of the fact that we’re out here to have fun.

Once out of the canyon the trail curves and winds mile over mile… the majority of runners followed every curve, instead of running straight tangents for the shortest distance…I tried to imagine the lines the race organizers used to measure the course, and not take any unnecessary steps.

This race is truly challenging with those long, unprotected miles at the end, including the suspension bridge that undulates for a good 2/10 of a mile – it can really mess with your knees, hips and back if you don’t slow down a hair and go with the flow. And then the mile markers seem to surely be stretched out too far, and the day was really warming toward the 80-degree high… I just kept thinking about relaxing my shoulders, concentrating on my form, and a strong cadence.

I had switched my garmin to heart rate and was using that to guide me – not pace. This is new for me this year – I’ve always approached races with time & pace goals… this year my goal is to be more realistic about where I am, now. My ability, today. Heart rate can be tricky on race day, depending upon nerves, elevation, etc. But for a long endurance event like the half marathon, I’ve learned what my numbers are, and how to also integrate perceived effort, and gradually build from low zone 3 for the first four miles, mid zone 3 for miles 4-7 (except the hill), high zone 3/low 4 for miles 7-10, and building zone 4+ for the last 5k.

And just like that I could hear the crowd at the finish, long before I could see them. The final two long blocks are uphill and seem to take forever, but as soon as that thought passed, my name was being announced.

As I crossed the finish line I glanced at my watch, switching from heart rate to time… I’d watched the 1:50 pacer pass me in the first half of the race, but never saw the 2:00, so I wasn’t surprised at my 1:57 time. But I wasn’t thrilled either – after all, despite my “I’ll-just-run-to-my-ability” approach, I DO care. I’d run faster several times in the past, and chalked this up to a solid effort and good for my overall training. I later learned that my finish was good enough for 2nd place among the 39 bad-ass women in my age group – a reminder that every course is different, and we do slow as we age.

I was buoyed by all the volunteers, the medals, festival vibe, and the Kaiser Permanente booth, drawing a huge crowd. This booth, just past the finish line, had the longest line by far. Finishers stood in queue, stretching quads and wiping sweat, for the coveted prizes Kaiser was rewarding. The literal fruits for our labor? A little free farmers market where runners were able to load a whole bag of produce – tomatoes, peppers, apples, broccoli, and mounds of fresh KALE.

Because it is the COLORADO Marathon after all.

Colorado takes eighth straight collegiate title

COLORADO WINS EIGHTH STRAIGHT TEAM TITLE AT USA TRIATHLON COLLEGIATE CLUB NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

Buffaloes also earn women’s team title, Navy takes men’s title

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. – The University of Colorado earned its eighth consecutive overall team title on Saturday at the USA Triathlon Collegiate Club National Championships in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Colorado also earned the women’s team title, and the U.S. Naval Academy took home the men’s team title.

Men’s, women’s and overall team standings were determined based on results from both Friday’s draft-legal sprint races and Saturday’s non-drafting Olympic-distance races.

For the overall team title, Colorado edged out Navy by just nine points, earning a total of 4,389 points to Navy’s 4,380. Cal Berkeley placed third in the overall team standings with 4,109.

Colorado has won the overall team title since 2010, and has not failed to finish in the top three for the last 15 years. Navy has also been strong in recent years, placing 3rd overall in 2016 and 2nd in 2015. The last time Cal Berkeley reached the overall team podium was in 2014, when the team placed 3rd.

Colorado was also named the women’s team champion. The top-four Colorado women in Saturday’s Olympic-distance race placed 4th, 5th, 12th and 31st. Those results, combined with a 1st-place finish from Erica Hawley in the women’s draft-legal race on Friday, gave the team a point total of 2,202. Placing second in the women’s team standings was Navy with 2,180 points, and Cal Berkeley was third with 2,165 points.

The last time Colorado earned the women’s team title was in 2012, but the team has reached the women’s podium every year since 2003.

Navy came out on top in the men’s team competition with 2,200 points, edging out second-place University of Colorado by just 13 points. Navy’s men placed 6th, 7th, 10th and 11th in Saturday’s Olympic-distance race, and recorded a 5th-place finish from Kevin Holder in Friday’s draft-legal race.

Rounding out the podium for the men’s team standings was the University of Arizona with 2,156 points.

Navy last captured the men’s team title in 2015, and finished second behind Colorado in 2016. Navy was also the men’s team champion in 2007 and 2003.

Navy also earned the Armed Services Team title, awarded to the top-performing military academy at the Collegiate Club National Championships.

Individual combined titles were awarded to the top overall performers of the weekend. Results were determined by combining an individual athlete’s scores from Friday’s draft-legal sprint and Saturday’s Olympic-distance race. On the men’s side, Colorado’s Feeney took the combined title with 746 points. Joshua Fowler of the University of Arizona was second with 737, and Navy’s Holder was third with 720.

Colorado’s Hawley earned the women’s combined title with a score of 739. She was followed closely in the standings by West Point’s Teresa Groton with 733 and Cal Berkeley’s Anna Belk with 723.

In addition to Saturday’s Olympic-distance championship, the race schedule included a super-sprint Mixed Team Relay race on Saturday afternoon. That event was halted early due to impending inclement weather. Despite the event’s cancellation, USA Triathlon will award the pre-determined prize money to the top five teams at the time of stoppage.

For more information about the USA Triathlon Collegiate Club National Championships, visit usatriathlon.org/usatcn17.

*At Saturday’s Awards Ceremony, the overall team, women’s team, individual men’s combined and individual women’s combined standings were incorrect. For a statement from USA Triathlon regarding the errors, visit usatriathlon.org/usatcn17.

2017 USA Triathlon Collegiate Club National Championships – Awards

Draft-Legal Collegiate Club Championships
Complete Results

Men’s Overall
1. Dan Feeney (Colorado), 57:07
2. Joshua Fowler (Arizona), 57:11
3. Collin Chartier (Marymount), 57:23
4. Timothy Winslow (Colorado), 57:41
5. Kevin Holder (Navy), 57:45

Women’s Overall
1. Erica Hawley (Colorado), 1:09:03.3
2. Teresa Groton (West Point), 1:11:14
3. Allison Light (UCLA), 1:11:27
4. Maeghan Easler (Iowa State), 1:11:32
5. Anna Belk (Cal Berkeley), 1:11:52

Olympic-Distance Collegiate Club Championships
Complete Results

Men’s Overall
1. Nick Noone (Colorado), 1:55:11
2. Sean Harrington (UCSB), 1:55:42
3. Ernest Mantell (Arizona State), 1:55:56
4. Christopher Douglas (Georgia Tech), 1:56:04
5. Dan Feeney (Colorado), 1:56:23

Women’s Overall
1. Cecilia Davis-Hayes (Columbia), 2:11:19
2. Hannah Grubbs (UCLA), 2:18:26
3. Darby Middlebrook (Michigan), 2:18:38
4. Marissa Platt (Colorado), 2:19:14
5. Ali Brauer (Colorado), 2:19:43

Men’s Combined Award
Complete Results
Dan Feeney (Colorado, 746
Joshua Fowler (Arizona), 737
Kevin Holder (Navy), 720

Women’s Combined Award
Complete Results
Erica Hawley (Colorado), 739
Teresa Groton (West Point), 733
Anna Belk (Cal Berkeley), 723

Men’s Team Standings
Complete Results
Navy, 2,200
Colorado, 2,187
Arizona, 2,156

Women’s Team Standings
Complete Results
Colorado, 2,202
Navy, 2,180
Cal Berkeley, 2,165

Overall Team Standings
Complete Results
Colorado, 4,389
Navy, 4,380
Cal Berkeley, 4,109

Armed Services Team Champions: Navy
Team Spirit Award: Stanford

2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship Triathlon Awarded to Nice, France

TAMPA/NICE (April 20, 2017) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, announced today that the right to host the 2019 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship triathlon has been awarded to Nice, France. The event will take place on Saturday, September 7 and Sunday, September 8, 2019, and will be the first time IRONMAN holds a world championship event in France. In addition, IRONMAN announced today that a brand new IRONMAN 70.3 event will be held in Nice on September 16, 2018 leading to the world championship event a year later; this qualifying event will then continue in 2020 as part of the IRONMAN 70.3 European Tour.

As the capital of the Alpes-Maritimes on the French Riviera in the southeast coast of France, Nice first hosted an IRONMAN® event in 2005 and since then has been one of the most popular locations on the IRONMAN race circuit. The world championship is the pinnacle event in the IRONMAN 70.3 Series, and with the event’s global rotation that began in 2014, it showcases the best venues IRONMAN has to offer around the world.

“The successful growth of the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship since its global rotation began in 2014 can be attributed in large part to Diana Bertsch, the world championship team she established, the host cities, and the collective determination to create an event that captures the hearts and minds of our athletes,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for IRONMAN. “With the origins of the popular Nice triathlon which set the stage in the region, this is the next evolution of this extraordinary event and brings Europe back to the forefront, with a history of culture, sport and scenery that is the perfect mix for IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship athletes.”

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship event expects to attract more than 5,000 athletes from over 100 global qualifying events in locations such as Austria, Australia, China, Germany, Spain, South Africa, Sweden and the Americas.

With its mix of old-world opulence, year-round sunshine and stunning seaside location, Nice is the unofficial capital of the Côte d’Azur and the fifth-largest city in France. A magnet for beachgoers and culture-seekers since the 19th century, this coastal city has fabulous markets, an enticing old town, glorious architecture and a wealth of high-end restaurants. With one of the largest international airports in France located just minutes away from the city, Nice is easily accessible and welcomes over five million visitors every year as one of the most famous tourist destinations in the world. Beyond the beauty of the area, Nice also offers a rich culture built by some of the greatest painters, writers and musicians the world has known. With outstanding cuisine and culture, Nice embodies all the benefits of a historic coastal city. If you really want to soak up the Riviera vibe, there’s no better place.

“It is with great pride that our city will host this international competition for the first time in France, with a sport that is particularly well established in Nice. Since 1982, our city has organized world-renowned triathlon events, held in an exceptional setting with a truly unique course,” said Christian Estrosi, President Region Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur. “This will undoubtedly be a momentous occasion for all triathlon enthusiasts and I welcome everyone to enjoy the beauty of our city. Nice is now recognized as a great host city for major events of international recognition. This dedication to staging events is an essential asset for the development of economic activity. Each year, IRONMAN brings € 4 million in economic revenue, and I am convinced that this new event will once again strengthen our attractiveness as a host city and boost our local economy.”

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is part of a week-long festival that will include a range of lifestyle events for the community and visitors to enjoy.

“With IRONMAN France, our French team lead by Yves Cordier has created one of the best IRONMAN events in the world, as voted by athletes in the IRONMAN Athletes’ Choice Awards. It is only fitting that the 2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship has been awarded to Nice and the Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur region,” said Hans-Peter Zurbrügg, Managing Director for IRONMAN Europe, Middle East and Africa. “Both the city and region offer easy access, a stunning backdrop for the event, and exceptional tourism destination for friends and family. We look forward to welcoming athletes from all over the world to this amazing location.”

The event will incorporate a swim in the pristine waters of the Mediterranean Sea, a bike course that passes through villages and mountains, and a run course along Nice’s historic Promenade des Anglais waterfront.

“Ever since competing as a professional athlete in the 1989 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawai’i, it has been my dream to bring a world championship event to the city and region I call home; that dream is now becoming a reality,” said Yves Cordier, Managing Director, IRONMAN France. “I would like to extend my gratitude to the City of Nice and the Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur for their loyalty and trust in our team. We are ready to welcome the world to Nice!”

Prior to the 2019 edition taking place in Nice, the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is taking place on September 9 and 10, 2017 in Chattanooga, Tennessee; and the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship will travel to Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa on September 1 and September 2, 2018.

For more information about the event, please visit http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/events/ironman-70.3/world-championship.

Dash-n-Dine Race Recap: Fun is Key

By Cheri Felix

Now that we’ve completed Dash & Dine #1, here is my race report. Mine might be different than the usual race report (as if anyone else went home to write in their Dash & Dine diary).

Easy. I signed up a long time ago so all I needed to do was pick up my bib. Keep your bib. It’s your bib for the series. That’s slick. Now all I have to do is show up. No waiting in line. Now I have more port-o-potty time.

Warmup. Matt from Revolution Running lead us in a FREE coached warmup. First we ran and then we did drills. It was my first coached warm up and I’ll admit, my first real warm up. Matt was nice and helpful. It was fun. And he’ll be there again next Tuesday.

Fun. I want to be very clear. I am not that person who says “I’m just out here to have fun. I don’t care about my time.” That’s not me. I do care about my time. I want to get faster and stronger. Of course, at some point I won’t get faster, things will level out. But for now, there’s room for improvement. But it does have to be fun. Even after childbirth they handed me a beautiful baby. Suffering is fine as long as it’s served with a side of fun. Friends, kind spectators, food afterwards and a welcoming finish line; all ingredients for a fun evening.

My time. Okay, here it is. My time was 14 seconds slower than my fastest time last year. Which means I am 14 seconds slower than my peak time which was at the END of the Dash & Dine 5k series. The good news is that my last mile was faster than my first two. Can I go out a few seconds faster on the first mile without losing it? Can I go a bit faster on the second mile if there is no headwind this time? Maybe. Or maybe #2 will just be slower. What then? Who knows. Perhaps that’s part of why we line up. It’s an unknown and in this life of immediately knowing whatever we need to know whenever we need to know it (goodbye microfiche, hello Google) we line up not knowing how it will all work out. And like when some of us get married or take our car into the shop, we hope for the best.

Honesty. I’ll be honest. There are some people out there that are fast. Like 18, 19, 20 minute 5k fast. You can’t see me, but I’m clapping for them. For the rest of us, we line up, we run and we finish. Our time is our time. It’s a number on a clock. It’s not a statement about who you are as a person. It’s not a determinate of how long you’ll live or how much you will be loved. It’s not a hint as to how nice you are or how you will be remembered. It’s a number and it’s your number.

I hope you’ll come out for the next Dash & Dine on Tuesday. I’ll be there and I’ll probably be talking loudly at the start and laughing at the finish. If you need a pep talk, come find me.

See you there!

USAT 2017 Collegiate & High School National Championships

Colorado’s Brittany Warly, the 2016 Collegiate Draft-Legal Champion. Mario Cantu/CIMAGES.

COLLEGIATE CLUB AND HIGH SCHOOL TRIATHLETES TO RACE FOR NATIONAL TITLES IN TUSCALOOSA NEXT WEEK

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The nation’s top collegiate club and high school triathletes will compete for national titles starting next Friday at the 2017 USA Triathlon Collegiate Club & High School National Championships in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, from April 21-22.

More than 1,300 collegiate athletes from 120 clubs and more than 130 high school triathletes are set to race.

The action begins Friday at 8:15 a.m. with the fifth-annual Draft-Legal Collegiate Championships, where athletes will compete over a 750-meter swim, five-lap, 20.2-kilometer bike and 5-kilometer run course. The collegiate men will race first, followed by the collegiate women at 10 a.m.

Also on the docket for Friday is the second annual High School National Championships. Athletes will compete in sprint-distance event featuring a 750m swim, three-lap, non-drafting 20.25k bike and 5k run course. The boys’ high school race will begin at 12 p.m., and the girls’ race will follow at 1 p.m. The High School Nationals race was contested for the first time last year in Clemson, South Carolina.

Racing continues on Saturday with the marquee Collegiate Club National Championships Olympic-distance race, which has long been a staple of the Collegiate Club Nationals program. Athletes will cover a 1,500m swim, non-drafting 40k bike, 10k run course, with the men starting at 7:30 a.m. and women starting at 10:20 a.m.

The weekend concludes with the Collegiate Mixed Team Relay on Saturday at 4:15 p.m. Teams are comprised of four athletes (two men and two women), with each athlete covering a 300m swim, 5.9k bike, 1.6k run course. The Mixed Team Relay event will also feature up to 10 alumni teams.

For all races, athletes will swim in Black Warrior River, bike and run on Jack Warner Parkway, the Tuscaloosa Riverwalk and surrounding roads, and finish at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater.

Qualified athletes may compete in both the draft-legal and Olympic-distance Collegiate National Championship events, and both races will count toward the overall team scores. Winners of individual races, as well as all team standings, will be announced at the award ceremony, scheduled for 8 p.m. on April 22 at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater. The Awards Ceremony will also recognize the fastest swim, bike and run splits from the Olympic-distance collegiate race.

The 2017 Collegiate Club & High School National Championships will be the first event to utilize USA Triathlon’s new National Events App. The app, which features athlete tracking, event schedules, selfie filters and more, is available now for free download on iPhone and Android devices. For more information, visit usatriathlon.org/eventsapp.

Multisport fans can also follow the action on USA Triathlon’s live blog at usatriathlon.org/usatcn17coverage. Event coverage will begin 15 minutes prior to the start of the draft-legal sprint, high school and Olympic-distance events.

The University of Colorado has earned the Collegiate Club Nationals title for the past seven years and returns as the defending champion of the overall team title. Colorado also earned the men’s team title in 2016, while UCLA picked up the women’s team title for the third straight year.

Colorado’s Brittany Warly (women’s) and Penn State’s Mike Meehan (men’s) picked up individual wins last year in the Draft-Legal Collegiate Championships. Erica Clevenger of the University of Arizona earned the women’s Olympic-distance collegiate title, while Meehan took his second national title in as many days in the Olympic-distance event. Led by 2015 Collegiate Nationals champion Kelly Kosmo, UCLA earned the Mixed-Team Relay title.

Taylor Knibb (girls’) and Jake Baugher (boys’) were the inaugural high school national champions in 2016, while Sammy’s Fox Valley Region Club earned the high school club title.

A list of all collegiate club and high school competitors is available at usatriathlon.org.

Tuscaloosa is a familiar city for USA Triathlon, as it previously hosted both Collegiate Nationals in 2011 and 2012, and Age Group Nationals in 2009 and 2010.

Ironman: Calling All Women Who Tri

Women For Tri is looking for one inspirational woman to tell her story, raise support, and inspire other women to Tri as she represents us at the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii!

The purpose of the Women for Tri IRONMAN® World Championship Slot 2017 is two-fold: (1) to support a female IRONMAN triathlete who embodies the spirit of Women for Tri at the 2017 IRONMAN® World Championship, and (2) to raise at least $25,000 in support of Women for Tri charitable programs. Do you want to make a tangible positive impact on the lives of female athletes like yourself?

Apply here by April 15, 2017 at 11:59pm.

Women’s Wednesday: What to Wear for a 5k

From Dash-N-Dine

By Cheri Felix

Last week we talked about why you should do the Dash & Dine. Now that we’ve got that covered, this week I’m going to give you a bunch of free advice that will vary between sort of helpful to did she really say that? Let’s get started.

If you’re new to the Dash & Dine or to running or racing a 5K you should stick with me. If you’re totally a master and have the latest rage; a gear room and you run all the time, you should stick with me too. Okay, what to wear. I find that when I run I feel like I’m constantly on the verge of menopause. Meaning, I get hot easily. So it’s important to wear whatever you want and not get caught up in what everyone else is wearing and how much their clothing and shoes cost. It’s all about layers and keeping dry. Wear something you can take off and tie around your waist and yes, if it’s raining do not wear your puffy painted sweatshirt. You will be sorry if you do that. Final word; dress comfortably and know that it’s a 5k. You can wear anything for a 5k.

How serious will this be?

I’m going to be very honest because I think you can handle it. IT DOESN’T MATTER. This is like taking a test in high school; eyes on your own desk. If someone wants to act like they might get asked to join the NIKE running team, then great. For the rest of us, we are really just out there to push ourselves and to get some good photos to post on Facebook. What time should you get there? Well, race starts at 6:30. If you need to sign up on site, arrive early enough to to do that. Plan for time to warm up, which can mean calisthenics, push-ups, jumping jacks or running up the hill and back a few times. (Revolution Running will lead a FREE warm up with dynamic drills if you would like to join.) I tend to go for the Jack Black version; I talk a lot and try to look cool. And yes, you’ll need to pee. Do that when you get there, when the line is short(er).

In summary, the Dash & Dine is inclusive.

Whether your 5k time is 17:21 (yes, there are those people) or 49:19, you’ll fit in. You may feel a little like a fish out of water but that’s okay. It’s okay to feel a bit uncomfortable. It’s okay to wonder what you were thinking when you signed up. It’s okay to worry that all the other cool kids will be faster than you. When we feel uncomfortable and we still show up, that’s when the good stuff happens. Next time we’ll cover what it feels like to run a 5k and what you might want to start doing in order to get ready.

See you soon!

Join IRONMAN’s Team Colorado

 

 

IRONMAN has announced a Team Colorado program for IRONMAN Boulder this year.  If you are already registered for the June race this year or you and a friend are still trying to decide, check out what this program can offer.

 

Join Team Colorado—an exclusive program for athletes who live in the state of Colorado and are registered for IRONMAN Boulder 2017. Athletes who live and train in Colorado know that it’s an endurance sports mecca filled with amenities that go hand-in-hand with training and reaching your endurance goals. From farm-to-table dining, to the challenging altitude conditions, and the friendly people in each community, triathlon training in Colorado is truly a treat. Team Colorado is intended to a build community among triathletes in the state and brings all the best aspects of training in the Centennial state together in one easy place. Plus, the program offers several added benefits specific to your IRONMAN Boulder preparation.

 

Benefits:

  • Local meet-ups with pros to train  (schedule coming soon)
  • Swag bag of Team Colorado training gear (available for pick-up at training events)
  • Strava group to track training progress
  • Featured shout out in Athlete Guide
  • Team Colorado discounts with IRONMANStore.com
  • Exclusive Team Colorado emails with meet-up and additional benefits information
  • Joining the Team Colorado Strava Group

 

Check out these great video clips from the 2016 race!

 

Race Registration here

 

Stay tuned, 303Triathlon will keep you up to date on all you need to know with the IRONMAN Boulder Resource page

 

11 Ways to get to Kona

For long-course triathletes, the IRONMAN World Championship is the pot of gold at the end of a rewarding season of training. Here’s your roadmap.

Every year, more than 2,200 hard-working athletes have the chance to compete at the iconic IRONMAN World Championship on the Island of Hawai’i. It was there that Dave Scott and Mark Allen battled head to head in 1989’s “Iron War.”

It was there that IRONMAN legend Paula Newby-Fraser earned her historic eight victories. It continues to be where thousands of athletes have overcome illness and injury, fighting through their own—or sometimes others’—mental, emotional, and physical hardships.

The historic finish line on Ali’i Drive has become synonymous with big dreams, and even bigger accomplishments. It is the place where the IRONMAN mantra, “ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE”, pulses to the beat of the Hawaiian drum.

And we want to help you get there.

  1. Standard qualification: Every year, age-group athletes compete in full-distance races globally for one of only a handful of highly coveted slots to the IRONMAN World Championship. This route demands a lot of blood, sweat, and sometimes tears, as athletes compete against their fellow age-groupers for slots. Each of the 40 full-distance IRONMAN races in the 2017 qualifying series offers a different number of Kona qualification slots, which are then divided up according to the size of their respective age-group
  2. Qualify in China: Once again, this year our IRONMAN 70.3 races in China will be the only half-distance events where athletes can qualify for Kona. Pick a race, and get planning, you’re in for a treat:IRONMAN 70.3 Liuzhou: April 1, 2017—30 qualifying slots.
    IRONMAN 70.3 Qujing: August 27, 2017—30 qualifying slots.
  3. IRONMAN Legacy Program: The IRONMAN Legacy Program, now in its sixth year, rewards our most loyal athletes with a chance to compete in Kona. These athletes became eligible for selection based on a) completed a minimum of 12 full-distance IRONMAN races; b) never started the iconic IRONMAN World Championship; c) have completed at least one IRONMAN event in each of the 2015 and 2016 seasons; and d) be registered for an IRONMAN event in 2017. This year, we have added 100 additional Legacy slots to the annual 100, for a total of 200.
  4. IRONMAN Kona Drawing benefiting The IRONMAN Foundation: This year, The IRONMAN Foundation is offering a drawing for 10 slots, with a suggested (tax deductible) donation of $50.00 to benefit the Foundation’s charitable giveback in communities around the world. The drawing will begin on Friday, February 24, 2017, and finish on Friday, March 24, 2017 at 12 pm ET . Selected athletes will be announced on Friday, March 31. Click here to enter the drawing.Related Article: 39 Things You Didn’t Know About Kona
  5. Physically Challenged Open/Exhibition Division Drawing: To honor the vision of IRONMAN co-founders, John and Judy Collins, IRONMAN remains committed to providing athletes of all abilities a means of entry to the world’s most challenging and prestigious one-day endurance event. Through the Physically Challenged Open/Exhibition Division Drawing, five physically challenged athletes from around the world will be drawn to receive entry to the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship. Further guidelines and registration information can be found at ironman.com/pcdrawing.
  6. IRONMAN Foundation annual Kona auction: Beginning on April 1, 2017, one slot will be auctioned off each week for five weeks on eBay. The first four slots will benefit the IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund and will be 100 percent tax deductible less the value of the race registration (minimum opening bid of $25,000). Visit the IRONMAN Foundation website for more information. For the second year, The IRONMAN Foundation will offer a fifth slot (also 100 percent tax deductible) with 100 percent of the funds going to support Women For Tri — a program of the IRONMAN Foundation that works to increase female participation at all levels of triathlon (minimum opening bid of $25,000).
  7. Women For Tri slots: The Women For Tri initiative will also allocate one additional slot to a female triathlete who both a) embodies the spirit of Women For Tri through a compelling personal story that motivates and inspires other women to “Tri”; and b) raises or contributes at least $25,000 to the Women For Tri charitable, tax-deductible effort. This slot will be distributed via an application process. Additional details are available at the IRONMAN Foundation website.
  8. IRONMAN Executive Challenge: With 25 slots set aside for the IRONMAN World Championship, IRONMAN XC creates a true competition among peers at XC qualifying events, with top performers awarded IRONMAN World Championship slots. The program brings together executives at select events around the globe for a unique and ultra-personalized IRONMAN race weekend experience. This turn-key program streamlines all logistics surrounding an IRONMAN event and provide a white glove level of service. Additionally, family and guests experience VIP treatment throughout event weekend with a front row seat to all the action.
  9. Bonus Kona slots: This year, bonus slots to the IRONMAN World Championship were allocated to a few select races in different regions. Ten lucky athletes won the chance to race at Kona via a drawing relating to IRONMAN Boulder, taking place on June 11. IRONMAN Australia, taking place on May 7, 2017, provided a similar promotion with 10 entries to Kona. In the coming weeks, information will be provided on on a special opportunity for athletes racing at IRONMAN Maastricht – Limburg on August 6, 2017.
  10. Japan to Whistler to Kona! This year, an additional 20 qualifying slots to the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona, Hawai’i, are up for grabs for Japanese nationals racing IRONMAN Canada. These slots will be allocated based on the athlete’s Age-Group Ranking upon conclusion of the race. Click here for more information.
  11. IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii, Honu to Kona: Thanks to the Island of Hawai’i Visitor’s Bureau, 10 Kona slots are on offer to anyone who registers for IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii by May 1, 2017. Click here for more information.

Outdoor Divas Preview: The PERFECT First Tri

By Kirsten McCay

Hey Ladies! The PERFECT First Tri For You Or Someone You Know!
Have you always thought how fun/awesome/challenging/life-changing it would be to complete a triathlon, but you thought you could NEVER do something like that? Well think again! Without Limits, the top multisport racing company in Colorado, has something just for you!
The Outdoor Divas sprint distance triathlon has been awarded the best women’s event in Colorado by Competitor Magazine and is a safe place for women on all ages, shapes, sizes, abilities, and backgrounds to come together and experience what it is like to become a triathlete.

A few things make this race ideal for beginners…

1. It’s a women only event so you can feel supported and safe.
2. It’s capped at 600 women so the numbers aren’t overwhelming in the swim and transition areas.
3. It’s a sprint distance which is 750 meter swim, 12.9 mile bike, and 3.1 mile run/walk.
4. Each swim wave only has 50 swimmers so there is plenty of space to avoid getting touched and swam over by other swimmers.
5. There is a swim wave designated for first-timers only with more safety and support, and fewer fast, intimidating swimmers.
6. The water is warm enough in July you don’t need to wear a wetsuit.
7. You can use ANY type of bike to ride. You don’t need any fancy gear.
8. You can walk the entire run.
9. If you are a mom of little ones, there will be a kid sitting area during the race so you can focus on yourself and your race.
10. There is no time cut offs so every single person can finish!!

This race is held at the Union Reservoir in Longmont which is fairly flat with smooth roads, and amazing views.
When my mom turned 50, I gave her a race entry into an all women triathlon. She was so scared but I promised her she would cross the finish line with my help. She had never been an athlete, was overweight, and had arthritis in her knees and hips. The race she did was similar to the Outdoor Divas Sprint Triathlon and with the positive environment, the support from the volunteers, families, and other women racing, and the sense of accomplishment she felt when she crossed the finish line, she went on to race 3 more all-women triathlons. She considers these some of her top accomplishments in her life!
I want that for each and every one of you! Please share this with any woman you know who may want to challenge herself, accomplish something incredible, try something new, have an excuse to get into shape, looking for a new hobby, or just want to have a fun experience surrounded by other positive healthy women.
Check out all the race info today and make sure you register ASAP! Due to the low cap, this race has sold out the past 9 years. Last year reached capacity on June 20th so please take advantage of the early registration!