Paratriathlon Military Engagement Program Wins U.S. Olympic Committee’s Diversity & Inclusion Choice Award

Photo Credit: USA Triathlon

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — The United States Olympic Committee today announced USA Triathlon’s Paratriathlon Military Engagement Program as the recipient of its annual Diversity & Inclusion Choice Award.

Now in its fifth year, the D&I Choice Award recognizes an NGB or High Performance Management Organization (HPMO) for the creation of a single diversity and inclusion best practice or a series of diversity and inclusion best practices. After an internal USOC selection committee narrows down the submissions, finalists are put to a vote of representatives from NGBs and HPMOs across the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Movement.

USA Triathlon’s program received the highest number of votes, and the organization will be honored at a celebratory dinner on Friday, Sept. 21, as part of the 2018 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Read more about this award here.

 

Tri Coach Tuesday: Time to Reflect

As the 2018 race season comes to a close, it is time to reflect upon all things training and racing. Reflection defined means “serious thought or consideration.” Whether you are an age group athlete or a pro, a middle of the packer or you’re just happy to finish, reflection will provide great insight into the next steps of your journey.

Designate a time on your calendar to sit down for 45 minutes and allow yourself time to reflect.  If you are like many athletes, you may need that appointment to be listed on your training plan to add the accountability.  Protect the time and deem it to be as important as any of the training segments that you completed. Take the 5/5/5 approach.  Focus your reflection on 5 celebrations, 5 challenges and 5 goals from your past year.

Read Coach Kim’s full blog post here

 

Weekend Preview

Triathlon Events

Saturday Sept 15th

 

Littlefoot Triathlon

Morrison


Sunday Sept. 16th

 

Harvest Moon Long Course Triathlon

Boulder



Cycling Events

Thursday Sept 13th

 

BVV Thursday Night Racing

Erie


Salida Bike Fest

Salida


Friday Sept. 14th

 

Pedal the Plains

Kiowa


Monarch Crest Enduro

Salida


Salida Bike Fest

Salida


Saturday Sept. 15th

 

VIDA MTB Clinic & Golden GiddyUp 

Golden


Two Moon 24

Glendo, WY


Tour de Vineyards

Palisade


Pedal 4 Possible

Louisville


Todd’s Durango Dirt Fondo

Durango


Blue Sky Velo CX Cup

Longmont


Pedal the Plains

Bennett


Salida Bike Fest

Salida


Monarch Crest Enduro

Salida


Sunday Sept. 16th

 

20th Anniversary Monarch Crest Crank

Salida

 

The Monarch Crest Crank is a mountain bike event along one of the top mountain bike trails in the nation – The Monarch Crest. Join us for the 20th Anniversary of this historic fundraiser benefiting The Alliance on Sunday, September 16th!

The Crest Crank will be the final day of Salida Bike Fest, which includes several events for cyclists of all abilities and their families. End Bike Fest weekend with us for this bucket list ride followed by an after party at Riverside Park open for Crest Crank cyclists and the public.


Liv Autumn Harvest – Women’s Group Ride to Pastries

Boulder


Outdoor Diva New Member Ride

Boulder


Monarch Crest Enduro

Salida


Salida Bike Fest

Salida


Pedal the Plains

Limon

 

Weekend Preview

Triathlon Events

Saturday Sept. 1st

 

Grant Ranch OWS

Lakewood


Sunday Sep.t 2nd

 

Breck Crest Trail Run

Breckenridge


Grant Ranch OWS

Lakewood



Cycling Events

Thursday August 30th

 

BVV Thrusday Night Racing

Erie


Friday August 31st

 

TriVelo Youth CX Camp

Larkspur


Saturday Sept. 1st

 

10th Annual Steamboat Springs Stage Race

Steamboat Springs


Estes Epic MTB Race

Estes Park


BVV Saturday Sprints

Erie


TriVelo Youth CX Camp

Larkspur


Sunday Sept. 2nd

 

West Elk Bicycle Classic

Gunnison

The West Elk Bicycle Classic covers country that should be felt up close, like on a bicycle.

Do you want a shorter ride on a most beautiful road? Try our 34-46 mi route on the north rim of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison.
Do you want something a little longer? With some gravel? Try our 52 mile Raghorn loop.
Do you want a lot of gravel? Try our 100mile loop extension of the Raghorn loop with about 66 mi of lung ripping gravel.
And the original 134 mi loop that connects all three of these great rides together for the more seasoned cyclist.

Fully supported charity ride and full of fun…join us and register today!

This ride provides funding for:

Western State Colorado University, Type 1 diabetes research, Sharon’s Kids, Bikes and Books for Kids


Grand Traverse MTB 

Crested Butte


10th Annual Steamboat Springs Stage Race

Steamboat Springs


TriVelo Youth CX Camp

Larkspur


Monday Sept. 3rd

 

10th Annual Steamboat Springs Stage Race

Steamboat Springs


TriVelo Youth CX Camp

Larkspur

Tri coach Tuesday: How to Avoid a Stress Fracture

As athletes strive to improve themselves and their performances, they often push themselves to the point of injury.

The inherent cross training by multisport athletes can decrease the number of injuries, but unfortunately it does not eliminate them. Overuse bone injuries occur primarily during the running phase of training and racing and are more common with high running mileage and in individuals training for long course events.

Overuse injuries to bone encompasses a spectrum, from bone inflammation (stress reactions) to small fractures on one side of the bone (stress fractures), to breaks all the way through the bone. Stress fractures are a result of accumulative micro damage to bones from impact, which can lead to small or large breaks.

Bone is dynamic tissue with constant bony absorption and deposition stimulated by bone stress. Micro damage is a normal process that occurs with activity and is correlated with intensity and the amount of impact.

The body usually heals the micro damage before it can accumulate, and during the healing process, the body lays down extra bone to strengthen and prevent future injuries. This process is how athletes can improve their bone density. Unfortunately, there are times when athletes overwhelm their body’s ability to heal the bone stress and the damage accumulates to the point of localized inflammation or fracture.

The factors that are correlated with increased bony damage include: high running mileage, training errors, low bone density, high ridged arches, inappropriate foot wear, leg length discrepancies, and other malalignments. The most common of these factors that I see in the office are training errors, too much too soon, and inadequate recovery time, but all of them need to be considered.

image from realbuzz.com

The most common sites for stress fractures in runners are the shin (tibia) and foot bones (metatarsals and tarsals). Stress fractures typically present gradually but can also start with sudden pain.

Athletes sometimes are confused when a stress fracture presents acutely. Early inflammation and stress reactions can be pain free until the fracture occurs. Localized bony pain and tenderness is the hallmark of stress reactions and stress fractures. The area of pain is typically small and about the size of a half dollar. This localization is in contrast to shin splints, where the pain is over a much broader area such as the size of a dollar bill.

 

Complete USAT post here

Dakota Jones Wins Pikes Peak Marathon After Biking 250 Miles to Get There

From Runner’s World
By Andrew Dawson

As if racing up and down a mountain wasn’t hard enough.

The winner of the Pikes Peak Marathon not only crushed the race itself, but also the four days of travel leading up to it: He biked 250 miles to get to there.

Dakota Jones, 27, of Durango, Colorado, departed Silverton, Colorado for Colorado Springs with the intention of raising money for Protect Our Winters, a non-profit environmental group that has brought together athletes against climate change, according to the Durango Herald.

“I’m really aware of climate issues and environmental problems,” Jones told the Durango Herald. “Those things can be super sort of paralyzing. It’s such a big problem, what can I do? Honestly, me not driving and me biking doesn’t make that big of a difference, but if you think of it like that, then nobody will do anything. We have to do something, no matter how small it is, and so this is a good opportunity for me to put this into practice.”

Once at the race, things did not go as planned during the ascent for Jones, placing between fifth and seventh until he reached the treeline. After that, he was second to the 14,112-foot summit in 2:17:22, and his blistering 1:13:53 descent gave him the five-minute victory. His descent time was a course record, and his official time was 3:32:20.

Read the full article

Is running outside in all the wildfire smoke bad for you?

From 9News
By Allison Sylte

Smoke from wildfires in California and Canada is making the air tremendously hazy in Denver. Here’s what you should know if you still want to run outside.

KUSA — The best thing about running is that, unlike other things in life such as eating an entire cake, you never regret doing it once you’re finished.

But, with smoke from the wildfires out west blocking out both the sun and Colorado’s mountain views, it’s fair to wonder if it might be time to opt for an indoor workout.

The good news? Unless you have preexisting breathing problems, you likely won’t do lasting damage by getting in your run outside. That’s according to Dr. Anthony Gerber, a pulmonologist at National Jewish Health.

RELATED | Thick smoke clouds the air across the Front Range Monday

“It’s pretty unlikely that a young, otherwise healthy person is going to have damage from breathing [wildfire smoke],” Gerber said.

Read the full article

Rob Krar and Katie Arnold Win Leadville Trail 100 Run

Photo by: Erin Strout

From Runner’s World
By McGee Nall

The intense race takes runners from elevations of 9,200 to 12,600 feet in the extreme terrain of the Colorado Rockies.

For the second time, 41-year-old Rob Krar from Flagstaff, Arizona won the Leadville Trail 100 Run on Saturday night. The intense race, which takes runners through high elevations along forest trails and mountain roads in the Colorado Rockies, is “where legends are created and limits are tested,” according to its website.

Krar took the podium at 15:51:57, more than hour ahead of this year’s second place finisher, Ryan Kaiser. Krar’s time beat his 2014 win and PR time of 16:09:32.

“Going back to Leadville four years after I first ran it was definitely a magical experience,” Krar told Runner’s World. “Back in 2014 when I ran it, at the time it was my most difficult 100 mile race ever, so I had been wanting to come back and have a more amicable experience.”

Krar, who says he had a “tough couple years” with injuries and personal issues, is hoping that this win will have a snowball effect and give him the momentum he needs to get his running back on track.

Read the full article

Blind Triathletes to Attend 3 Day Camp at US Olympic Training Center

By USA Triathlon

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — USA Triathlon and the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) have partnered to host the first-ever paratriathlon camp in Colorado Springs dedicated to athletes with visual impairments. Ten triathletes and ten guides from across the U.S. will travel to the U.S. Olympic Training Center to participate in the three-day camp, set for Thursday, August 23, through Saturday, August 25.

The camp will focus on the para-specific dynamics of swimming, biking and running, as well as other aspects of triathlon performance (basic nutrition, transitions, goal-setting, etc.). Coaches will include seven-time ITU Paratriathlon World Champion Aaron Scheidies (Seattle, Wash.), 2017 USA Paratriathlon Coach of the Year and Paralympic Head Coach for Team USA, Mark Sortino (Boise, Idaho), and USA Triathlon certified coach, tandem pilot and triathlete Amanda Leibovitz (Bellingham, Wash.).

Visual impairment is one of six paratriathlon categories recognized by the International Paralympic Committee and includes athletes who are totally blind and athletes who are partially sighted but legally blind. Triathletes with visual impairments compete alongside a guide. During the swim, the guide and athlete are tethered together — usually at the thigh or hip. The athlete then rides behind his or her guide, or pilot, on a tandem bike before finishing the race on foot with a tether connecting athlete and guide.

The following athletes, among others, will be available for media interviews:

Lindsay Ball (Benton, Maine) represented the U.S. at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in alpine skiing. She is a two-time U.S. Paralympics Alpine Skiing national champion and was the 2012 Winter Park IPC Alpine Skiing World Cup bronze medalist. Ball completed her first triathlon in 2010, and is now beginning to pursue the sport competitively.

Kyle Coon (Carbondale, Colo.) has been a triathlete since 2015. He has completed three long-course (IRONMAN 70.3) and two ultra-distance (IRONMAN) triathlons, in addition to several sprint and Olympic-distance events. Coon’s best long-course finish came at IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder last year, when he won the men’s physically challenged division covering the 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike and 13.1-mile run in 5 hours, 11 minutes, 9 seconds.

Michael Somsan (Gilbert, Ariz.) is a retired U.S. Army First Lieutenant who lost his vision to a gunshot wound in 1995. Somsan was the top finisher in the men’s physically changed division at the 2016 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. He has also completed IRONMAN Arizona (2015), IRONMAN 70.3 Oceanside (2016) and several sprint and Olympic-distance triathlons.

MEDIA OPPORTUNITIES: 
Media representatives are invited to capture coverage of the camp and/or conduct interviews with participants to help raise awareness about the sporting opportunities available to individuals who are blind and visually impaired, and how these athletes’ lives are being positively impacted through sport.

A tentative list of opportunities is outlined below. Training sessions may be altered depending on weather and scheduling. Please contact Caryn Maconi (USA Triathlon) or Courtney Patterson (USABA) if you would like to attend any of the training sessions.

Thursday, Aug. 23:
4-6 p.m. Run Session (Roads TBD)

Friday, Aug. 24:
8-11 a.m. Bike Skills/Ride (Roads TBD)
1-3 p.m. Swim Session – Outdoor Pool at U.S. Olympic Training Center*

Saturday, Aug. 25:

8-11 a.m. Bike Skills/Ride (Roads TBD)
1-3 p.m. Swim Session – Outdoor Pool at U.S. Olympic Training Center*
3-4 p.m. Transition Skills (Roads/OTC)

Read full article

Tri Coach Tuesday: How to Handle Steamy Race Days

BY SAGE MAARANEN

After the 2018 Ironman Boulder, the biggest complaint I heard from athletes was the heat and its relation to a high DNF rate. We are all aware that heavy exercise in high temperatures can lead to medical emergencies such as heat stroke, but so many tend to brush this off as something that could happen but certainly won’t happen to them.

So instead of focusing on heat illness, I’d like to discuss a heat-related issue that should catch any athlete’s attention: Yes, if your body overheats, your performance will be diminished and you will not be able to race at your full potential. Consider this athlete’s story.

Ironman Boulder second-timer Andrea Greger hit the start line prepared to annihilate her previous course time. The day started off well with a 15-minute PR on the swim leg, but by mile 30 of the bike, she knew she was in trouble. It was hot, she couldn’t eat and her pace suddenly slowed. After stopping three times to vomit, Andrea considered pulling from the race. With encouragement from teammates, she kept pedaling, finishing well behind her target pace.

As she started the marathon it quickly became clear that running wasn’t an option. No cooling effort could bring her core temperature down, and she vomited five more times. Although the task felt monumental, Andrea was determined not to quit and continued to march her way toward the finish.

“I remember at mile 25 of the run, a lady told me I was almost there, and I wanted to kill her!” she said. “It was another 20 minutes.”

Although it wasn’t the race she expected, Andrea learned a lot that day — about herself, about racing, and about the toll of heat.

Negative Effects of Heat on Performance

First, a quick physiology refresher. One of blood’s primary jobs during exercise is to carry oxygen to muscles. To cool the body, blood flow is shifted from muscles to the skin in an effort to dump heat. This process makes blood more difficult to pump to muscles to perform their work. The metabolic system used for muscle-fueling must then shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, and VO2Max will be reduced.

 

Complete USAT article here