Women for Tri Provides 450 Additional slots for 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships

400 Top performing female athletes based on 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Age Group Rankings and 50 top performing female athletes from Standard Bank IRONMAN 70.3 Durban provided with additional bonus qualification spots
TAMPA, Fla. (May 7, 2018) – Women For Tri®, a program of the IRONMAN Foundation®, today announced that a total of 450 additional women have earned an invitation to race in the 2018 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship taking place in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa on September 1 and 2, 2018. After previously announcing 50 additional slots allocated to the Standard Bank IRONMAN 70.3 Durban race for top finishing female athletes, Women For Tri is providing 400 additional slots for top-ranked female athletes based on their total 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Age Group Ranking (AGR) points. The additional slots will be utilized by Women For Tri, a program launched by IRONMAN to welcome and empower new female triathletes to be a part of the sport’s continued growth in high-level competition.

“We are excited to welcome top age-group athletes from around the world to this year’s IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in South Africa,” said Kyrsten Sinema, Chair of the Women For Tri Advisory Committee and U.S. Representative from Arizona. “Following in the footsteps of the women who raced in support of Women For Tri last year in Chattanooga, we hope the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship inspires women around the world to reimagine their potential as triathletes.”

Allocating these 400 additional slots based on IRONMAN 70.3 AGR will create a deeper field of female athletes and maintain the integrity and prestige of an IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship event. The AGR system measures an athlete’s performance in IRONMAN 70.3 races throughout the 2018 qualifying year.

All net proceeds from the registration revenue of the 400 additional slots will go towards supporting Women For Tri’s TriClub grant program. To date, nearly $250,000 has been awarded by this program to TriClubs around the world to support women’s engagement initiatives, including bringing first-timers into the sport. Since its inception in 2015, Women For Tri has seen an 18% increase in female participation in IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events, totaling more than 66,000 female athletes globally.

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is the pinnacle event in the global IRONMAN 70.3 series. The 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship race will be a two-day event with the professional and age group women racing on Saturday, September 1 and the professional and age-group men racing on Sunday, September 2. Nearly 5,000 athletes will qualify to race in the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship from among over 100 IRONMAN 70.3 races around the world throughout the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 qualifying season.

For questions about Women For Tri programming, please contact womenfortri@ironman.com. For media related inquiries, please contact press@ironman.com.

Passing the Torch: Educating the Next Generation of the Outdoor Industry

From Elevation Outdoors
By Harper Brown

The outdoor industry is booming, there’s no doubt about it. According to the Outdoor Industry Association, the outdoor recreation economy recorded $887 billion in consumer spending in 2016, a whopping figure that accounted for two percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product that same year. The industry as a whole generates roughly 7.6 million direct jobs in the U.S., and that number is on the rise — up from 6.1 million direct jobs logged in 2012. The outdoor industry is in the midst of a massive growth spurt, and that growth is spawning an industry-wide search for the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts, stewards of the land, champions of nature and sustainably-minded conservationist willing to grab the torch and carry on the business of inspiring responsible recreation in the great outdoors. And that search has officially landed on college campuses throughout the country.

On day two of the 2018 Outdoor Retailer + Snow Show in Denver, Colorado, the Outdoor Industry Association presented “The Next Wave of Outdoorist: The Importance of Growing Outdoor Communities on College Campuses” to an attentive crowd in the Colorado Convention Center. The panel included Dr. Carine Feyten (Texas Woman’s University), Alondra Martinez (Texas Woman’s University student), Scott Wyatt (president of Southern Utah University), Abigail Wyatt (Southern Utah University student) and Ian Levin (Senior Deputy Director for the Outdoor Foundation) as the moderator. The panel discussion highlighted the importance of college campuses promoting students to spend time outside; ultimately encouraging better performance, a closer college community, and more college students pursing careers in the outdoor industry.

Read the full article

Blind runners form a tight community

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Blind runner Amelia Dickerson, right, gets congratulated by her friend and guide Grace Dill, left, after finishing the 5 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

From the Denver Post

By Danika Worthington

About 15 participants enjoy the social nature of race

Members of the tight-knit group pumped up one another at the starting line.

Shoes were retied last minute as the national anthem played from the speakers. When it finished, the announcer asked blind and visually impaired runners to come forward.

The group made their way up. Crosby, a guide dog for runner Kerry Kuck, stood at the front of the pack. The runners prepared for their starting cue, which was a minute before the rest of the participants tackled the 5-mile route at the annual Cherry Creek Sneak.

“Crosby the dog is going to lead the way,” the announcer barked out to the crowd. Then, the start was signaled. The runners and their guides took off, breaking away down the first stretch.

The Colorado Springs based U.S. Association of Blind Athletes partnered with Achilles Denver, the local chapter of an international organization that gives athletes with disabilities a community of support, and Lending Sight, a Colorado sports club that connects those with good vision with blind or visually impaired runners, to recruit about 15 runners and guides to race Sunday.

For some, the sport is about escaping isolation or exploring freedom. For others, it is a fun form of exercise. Regardless of the motivation, the athletes all expressed a similar theme: Blind runners have a tight community in Denver.

Read the full story

Hayden Cog Run looms as running and biking race season approaches

From The Steamboat Pilot & Today

by Joel Reichenberger

Matt Milde runs down the Cog road near Hayden during last year’s Hayden Cog Run. The grueling early-season running race is back this year, one of the first events of the running and biking season.

Skiing and snowboarding season has already given way to running and cycling season for many local athletes who started airing up their tires and lacing up their sneakers before the lifts stopped turning. The competitive season for those athletes is coming up quickly, as well.

The first event of the Steamboat Springs Running Series is less than two weeks away, and an important deadline is even closer than that.

The Hayden Cog Run will celebrate its 40th anniversary on May 5 with a grueling early-season test, 8.4-miles up the Cog road in Hayden.

Signing up for the race in years past has usually included a race t-shirt, and it does again this year, but years of leftover boxes of shirts have encouraged organizers to set Wednesday as a deadline for signing up online and getting a shirt.

Read the full article

From Montana and India, they became friends and training partners in Denver; Sunday they went 1-2 in Cherry Creek Sneak 10-miler

From The Denver Post

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Kailas Kokare, left, and Jordan Jones, second from right, congratulate their friend and competitor Seth Garbett, second from left, after Garbett won the 10 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. Kokare came in second and Jones came in 4th. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

A pair of unlikely training partners — one from a small town in Montana, the other from a village in India — took the first two places Sunday in the Cherry Creek Sneak 10-miler. How Seth Garbett and Kailas Kokare became friends and roommates is an even more improbable story.

Garbett, who won Sunday in 51 minutes, 55 seconds, ran for Montana State after growing up in Darby, a town of 500 near the Montana-Idaho border by the Continental Divide. Kokare, who was second in 54:14, grew up poor in the hills near Mumbai and lost his right hand when he was a year old after placing it in a fire while his mother was distracted.

They met last summer through a mutual friend. When Kokare needed a place to stay, Garbett and his wife invited him to move in with them.

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MIRINDA CARFRAE, TIMOTHY O’DONNELL, MIKE REILLY RETURN TO LEAD 2018 IRONMAN FOUNDATION AMBASSADOR TEAMS

Ambassadors and new Mālama Club to support IRONMAN Foundation year-round

Photo from Endurance Sportswire

TAMPA, Fla. (April 23, 2018) – The IRONMAN Foundation® announced today the 2018 IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador Team and the creation of the Mālama Club. In celebration of IRONMAN’s 40th Anniversary, the IRONMAN Foundation has expanded its ambassador program by launching the Mālama Club, a team of 14 IRONMAN athletes who are ardent supporters of the IRONMAN Foundation’s mission of creating positive, tangible change in race communities and embody the spirit of the Hawaiian word Mālama, meaning to “take care of, preserve and protect.”

The supporting 2018 IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador Team is comprised of 22 carefully selected members: 19 age-group athletes; Team Captain, the “Voice of IRONMAN” Mike Reilly; and pro triathletes Mirinda Carfrae, a three-time IRONMAN® World Champion, and Timothy O’Donnell, a multi-year IRONMAN World Championship top-ten finisher. Ambassadors have been chosen for their outstanding involvement in their own communities and will continue to exemplify what it means to ‘Race for More’ by focusing their efforts on the IRONMAN Foundation’s 16 service projects this season. In 2017, the IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador team supported 14 service projects and contributed to the IRONMAN Foundation’s $1.5 million total in grant funding to 1,380 organizations in IRONMAN race communities.

“Having the honor of representing the IRONMAN Foundation last year as the Ambassador Captain was one of the highlights of my career,” said Reilly. “To be able to give back and help those in need throughout our IRONMAN communities is very gratifying and needed. I am looking forward to continuing that role in 2018 and hope others consider being a part of the IRONMAN Foundation team this year.”

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Weekend Preview: Let’s Do Some Running

Triathlon Events

Saturday April 21st

 

Silver Creek Raptor Run 5k

Longmont


Three Creeks Half Marathon

Denver



Cycling Events 

Saturday April 21st

 

Bill Davis Road Cup – Cancelled

Johbstown


Gravelanche Ride #3

Boulder


Bring Out Yer Bike

Denver


Squawker Classic TTT & Criterium

Durango


Sunday April 22nd

 

Squawker Classic Road Race

Durango

Weekend Preview: All Quiet ‘In’ Colorado

Triathlon Events

Saturday April 7th

USAT Duathlon National Championships

Piedmont, SC


Sunday April 8th

USAT Duathlon National Championships

Piedmont, SC



Cycling Events

Saturday April 7th

 

Buff Gold Road Race

Boulder


Women’s Vision Board Workshop

Boulder

 

This unique workshop is more that just Vision Boarding.  Experience the power of Jill’s 6 Step Manifestation Formula, the power of guided visualization, connect with your creative and fun self, and take home your completed vision board.

Sunday April 8th

 

Chad Young Memorial TT

Golden

 

303Beginner Tri Project: If I Wanna Tri, What Do I Need? What DON’T I Need?

by Alison Freeman

 

If you, your friend, your sister, your neighbor, or your mom is thinking about doing their first triathlon, here’s everything you need and everything you don’t:

1. You DO need to pick a race! And you need to sign up. Don’t think; just do it.

The 303 Beginner Tri Project recommends five beginner-friendly races:

The Longmont Tri / Longmont Try-a-Tri on June 2nd/3rd (pool swim!)
The Lookout Mountain Tri on June 30th (pool swim!)
Tri Boulder
on July 21st

Bounder Sunset
on August 25th
The Oktoberfest Sprint on September 23rd (fair warning: this one can be chilly!)

2. You DO want to find a person or a community that you can turn to for encouragement, accountability, questions, and support.

Join the 303 Beginner Facebook Group ! The group is for those new to triathlon, and is a place to share encouragement, whining, setbacks, and accomplishments. Coach Alison Freeman of D3 Multisport will be providing training guidance for the races listed above and is available to answer questions and provide guidance along the way.

3. You DO need to know how to swim; you DON’T need to know how to swim freestyle. Any which way you want to get though the swim portion of the event is just fine: freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke, sidestroke, doggie paddle, whatever. Sorry, those little arm floaties are not allowed (that’s why they make wetsuits – they’re practically flotation devices).

4. You DO need a swimsuit (for training) and goggles; you DON’T need a wetsuit … although it’s worth thinking through how much you enjoy cold water. If you’re not partial to it, your local multisport shop likely rents wetsuits, and there are bargains galore online for purchasing one if you don’t want to think about what the last person to rent the wetsuit might have done in it. (Don’t judge, though, everyone does it.)

5. You DO need a bike and a helmet; you DON’T need a “tri bike” or clip in shoes. Absolutely any bike will do: road bike, gravel bike, mountain bike, cyclocross bike, your standard cruiser with a basket and tassels, your kids’ bike, whatever. Just no e-bikes, cuz: really.

6. You DO want a way to carry water while on your bike, and you want to be comfortable taking sips of water while you’re riding.

7. You DO want to train so that you’re in shape enough to swim, bike, and then run or walk the designated distance. You DON’T need to be fast. (That should have been obvious when I said “run or walk.” Really, you can walk.)

8. You DO need something that you can wear from start to finish, cuz they don’t approve of public nudity in the transition area (that’s where you “transition” from swim to bike and then from bike to run); you DON’T need a fancy tri kit – an outfit that is specifically designed for swim-then-bike-then-run. You can swim in a bathing suit then pull bike shorts on top for the bike and trade for run shorts for the run. Or you can just wear the swimsuit. In which case you might want some bodyglide.

9. You DO want a bag or milk crate or duffel that will carry everything you need to the race start, and then home again after. Triathlon involves a lot of gear.

10. Finally, you DO want to enjoy it! All of it: the learning and the training and the nervousness and the excitement and – most of all – the finish line.

Tri Coach Tuesday: Training with Power

By Tim Cusick, TrainingPeaks

 

For cyclists and triathletes, training with power is likely the most effective way to maximize results. Why? Power meters and the data they provide remove a lot of the guesswork from training by supplying precise, accurate information for accurate measurement of training intensity and load, unlike heart rate training or rate of perceived exertion (RPE) training.

Even when athletes recognize that power training offers significant benefits, many of them are apprehensive about jumping into the power-training game because they’ve heard it’s complex and they aren’t sure they have the knowledge or technical skills to get the most out of it.

I’d like to make it easier. Here are a few simple steps to get started with power training and how to better understand the entire power training process.

 

Step 1: Ride with power

The first thing your should do after you buy a new power meter is set up your head unit with some key metrics to track. I suggest setting power, heart rate, and speed to display on the screen.

And then just ride, observe and record. That’s all you should do for two to four weeks. Don’t change anything about your riding or training yet. Simply observe and begin to quantify your efforts.

Be sure to record all your workouts, no matter how small. It’s pretty simple to automate the recording and uploading process, and these records will become your data diary and will be highly useful in the future.

This first step gives you time to get a feeling for the relationship between power and effort, along with a basic understanding of the quantification of training. If you went up a short hill, did it feel hard? Your power meter now gives a number for “hard.” Hard for you might be 450 watts or 600 watts. Soft pedal down the other side of the hill and watch how many watts that generates.

 

Original post here