Tri Club Tuesday: CU Tri Club Silent Auction

CU Triathlon’s Inaugural Silent Auction
By Paisley Sheehan

The CU Triathlon team would like to invite you to join us this Friday, March 9th at 6pm at Colorado Multisport for our inaugural auction!

This event is the work of many local businesses and team members, and we’ve brought together an impressive array of items to be bid upon. Entry is $10, and refreshments and door prizes will be part of the fun.

The University of Colorado Triathlon Team is a club made up of about 75 student athletes. We’re open to every level of triathlete – from first-timers just learning how to swim to athletes who race at the pro level. Our training keeps us together six days a week, and if that weren’t enough we still manage to find time to spend together as friends. Workouts are created by our three inspirational coaches, Brad Seng, Leigh Dodd, and Dave Sheanin, who lead practices and provide insight about anything and everything triathlon. The team is run by elected members who are responsible for fundraising, race travel, and so much more. We take pride in being a part of the local triathlon community and volunteer at many races throughout the year.

The Mountain Collegiate Triathlon Conference (MCTC) competes annually at local races like Boulder Sunset and Oktoberfest, as well as the Pumpkinman Triathlon in Boulder City, Nevada. The CU Triathlon team attends all of these races, culminating in the MCTC Championship race in Lake Havasu City, Arizona. All of this is in preparation for USA Triathlon Collegiate Club Nationals, taking place this year in Tuscaloosa, Alabama from April 27-28. All together, the University of Colorado Triathlon Team has taken home 18 national titles, including the last 8 consecutive years. As a competitive team, we train as hard as we race, but we also enjoy spending time together and sharing our passion for triathlon. As Coach Dave says, “Common suffering builds great teams” – and that has been our mantra for at least as
long as I’ve been on the team.We take pride in our team’s accomplishments, however, our focus is on working hard and having fun.

When my teammates talk about the team on social media or with prospective teammates, it is very common to hear the word “family” used. I can attest that the team feels like my second family, as many of best friends are on the team. One of my best decisions in college was to join the CU Triathlon Team, and every practice reminds me how grateful I am to be surrounded by so many amazing teammates.

Our team is mostly student funded. Every athlete is responsible for paying their own club dues, but our officers work hard to ensure the team has enough fundraising opportunities to subsidize expenses for teammates. ​As a key part of this effort, the University of Colorado Triathlon Team will be holding an inaugural silent auction at 6pm this Friday, March 9th at Colorado Multisport. We have worked with our team sponsors and other local businesses to bring together items that will make for an exciting auction. Products from companies including RŌKA, Boulder Running Company, and Honey Stinger with be featured. Also, you can enjoy a presentation given by local pro triathlete Cam Dye. We would love for anyone in the triathlon community and beyond to come and support us. All proceeds will benefit our journey to nationals by making it possible for more of our team to travel to Alabama.

To follow us on on our journey to Nationals, find us on Instagram @cutriteam, Facebook @CUTriathlon and our website

When is it Legal to Ride Bikes Two Abreast?

Golden’s Cyclist-Lawyer Megan Hottman explains the often-confusing question, When is it OK for cyclists to ride side-by-side and when is it advised to ride single file?

Originally published in Road Bike Review


Drivers get mad when cyclists ride side-by-side, but what does the law say

A friendly bike educator sent me the following inquiry:

“Hi, Megan: We have been teaching the Bicycle Friendly Driver course to hundreds of people in Northern Colorado and it has been really well received. A student in a class the other day brought up a point about side-by-side riding. He went away and did some research and then wrote the following to me. I’m hoping you might be able to provide some clarification so that we are providing accurate information.

Here’s what the student wrote:
-One of the behaviors cyclists do that upsets car drivers the most is riding side-by-side. I felt the way this was conveyed in the class was a bit confusing and might fuel the contention.

-What I heard you say was that if cyclists are being overtaken by faster traffic, they need to ride single-file.

– What I learned was that if cyclists were impeding the flow of traffic from behind by riding side-by-side, they needed to merge into single-file. In other words, if there is a clear view ahead to allow cars to stray out of their lane to give a pair of cyclists a minimum of three feet, then it was okay to ride side-by-side.

-In reading the Colorado statute it says, “Persons riding bicycles or electrical assisted bicycles two abreast shall not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic and, on a laned roadway, shall ride within a single lane.”

I’m not sure what that means. If one cyclist is on the shoulder and their buddy riding next to them is just inside the traffic lane, are they riding within a single lane? When is it okay to ride side-by-side?

First let’s start with an analysis of Colorado’s statute and its actual language. We don’t get to question why the legislature does what it does, we have to live with the actual words contained in the law. Often, a strict reading of the law can provide answers, but not always.

C.R.S. 42-4-1412(6) addresses when cyclists may ride two abreast:

(a) Persons riding bicycles or electrical assisted bicycles upon a roadway shall not ride more than two abreast except on paths or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles.

(b) Persons riding bicycles or electrical assisted bicycles two abreast shall not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic and, on a laned roadway, shall ride within a single lane.

Reading the two sections together, I conclude the following:

-Cyclists may not ride MORE than 2 abreast, unless they are somewhere exclusively for bikes, which would really only be a bike lane. Anywhere else, two-wide is the absolute legal max.

-Cyclists may only ride two abreast IF they are not impeding the normal/reasonable movement of traffic. If the cyclists riding two abreast ARE impeding traffic, the implication here is that they ride single file.

Read the full article

First Sub-4-minute Miler Roger Bannister Dies

From Bleacher Report

Sir Roger Bannister, the first person to run a mile in under four minutes, has died aged 88.

As BBC Sport relayed, the Bannister family released a statement confirming the news on Sunday morning.

In it, they noted the legendary runner “died peacefully” and “surrounded by his family who were as loved by him as he was loved by them.”

Bannister etched his name into athletics history on May 6, 1954, when he completed the mile distance in a time of three minutes, 59.4 seconds in Oxford, England.

Read the full article

Time to Tri: 303Radio Chats with Barry Siff

Recently USA Triathlon and IRONMAN teamed up and created the Time to Tri Initiative aimed at attracting 100,000 new athletes into the sport of Triathlon. In this podcast, Barry Siff, President of the USAT Board of Directors discussed how this initiative came to be, what it means for local races and how it will impact the sport overall. The program hopes to inspire grass roots approaches to making triathlon more accessible.

At 303Triathlon, we are starting the “303 Beginner Tri Project”. We will tackle some fundamental challenges beginners face and offer workout goals and key workouts for local races and encourage new triathletes to gather for information and group training opportunities. Stay tuned for more on this. Meanwhile, take a listen to this podcast with Barry!”


Weekend Preview: Have a Great Weekend!

Triathlon Events

Saturday March 3rd


27th Annual Steamboat Springs Pentathlon

Steamboat Springs

Moab Off Road Duathlon

Moab, Utah

Sunday March 4th


Moab Spring Trail Run

Moab, Utah

Mark Your Calendar:

Wednesday March 7th for Don’t Doubt Mental Training with Mental Skills Coach Will Murray


Cycling Events

Saturday March 3rd


Frostbite TT

Ft. Collins

Gravelanch Series Ride #1: Dirt & Donughts


Mineral Belt Mayhem


Sunday March 4th


DU City Park Criterium


DUST2 2nd Annual Winter Fat Bike Race

Pagosa Springs

Supertraining Ride


Tri Coach Tuesday: No Gut Training, No Glory

from APEX Coaching


Avoiding gastric distress:  Gastrointestinal Distress: is most commonly defined as a reduction in gastrointestinal blood flow (circulation) due to a buildup of lactic acid in the blood. This buildup of lactic acid results in the inability of the digestive system to effectively breakdown and process food, absorb nutrients to be used as fuel and clear the bowel. Peristalsis (The wave like muscle contractions in the intestine that help clear the bowel) is greatly compromised during gastric distress and can even cease until blood lactic levels return to normal.  The onset of Gastric Distress differs for every athlete and this is why it is important to practice your nutrition in training and not on race day. In general, most athletes will start to develop GI distress at 120 -180 minutes into race pace training or racing. Symptoms include: nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps and pains, bloating and burping.  Almost all endurance athletes will experience gastric distress and women are more likely than men to experience GI distress.

Upper GI distress manifests as heartburn, vomiting, belching, bloating, nausea and/or stomach pain, inability to eat or keep down food

Lower GI distress includes cramping, gas, urgency and diarrhea, vomiting

As endurance athletes we tend to be a “picky” bunch. We spend hours picking out the perfect bike, getting the perfect aero position, devote time to finding just the right chamois for all those hours in the saddle for training, and let’s not forget time spent analyzing and comparing all that training data. We leave no stone unturned when it comes to our equipment and what works best for us, and yet, we will devote more time to filling our water bottles than we will to developing a solid nutrition plan and strategy for training and race day. Your nutrition can be the single source to win or lose your long course event. Proper fueling is not an accident it must be tried and tested before race day to make your body work best for you.  Let’s chat a little about what you can do to ensure a happy gut on race day.

How does Gastric Distress affect my training/ racing?

Most athletes have found themselves out on a training run or ride searching for a corner store to buy a Coke or begging a gel or bar off a training buddy deep in the fog of bonking or cramping and it was a very long ride or run home. As we all know, the training post a “bonk” is pretty much useless and leaves you pretty sore and tired afterwards. The fundamental goal for fueling as an endurance athlete is that we want to maintain the most consistent blood sugar levels as possible for maximum use of the muscles, circulation and power output. This principle is also used in avoiding gastric distress. As we train the body builds up lactic acid in the muscles and we are in a race against time to fuel our body with electrolytes and carbohydrates before our GI system shuts down due to lack of blood flow as the body continues to buildup lactic acid.  Most of your solid foods should be consumed in the first 120 minutes of a prolonged race or during training. This fueling should include carbohydrates and electrolytes for the body to use as long term fuel during the event.  Continued fueling past this point should include soft foods such as chews, gels and liquids

When training practice what and when you will be eating. Don’t forget pre-race nutrition starting the week before your goal event.  Glycogen stores, hydration and even the amount of sleep you get all impact your body many days out from your goal event.

Original posting HERE


Written By Simon Bennet

Simon Bennett is an elite road, track and multisport coach for APEX Coaching. As an Australian Level 1 Triathlon Coach and Silver Level Swimming Coach he had several of his athletes selected to compete at the Australian National Triathlon Championships, ITU Elite races and Swimming National Championships. Simon was a podium endurance coach for British Cycling during the last Olympic cycle with 6 of his athletes winning gold medals in Rio on the road and track. For more information on Simon, click HERE.

How to Wildflower! Your Complete Guide to this Longstanding, Epic Triathlon

By Alison Freeman

Maybe you’ve signed up for Wildflower (what’s Wildflower? ) and haven’t quite sorted out your logistics for the epic weekend of triathlon, camping, beer, wine, and music. Or maybe you’ve always wanted to sign up for Wildflower, but have been holding back because sorting out the BYO details is just too overwhelming. (Do I have to eat freeze dried camp food for my pre-race dinner? Is there an option besides instant coffee? Where do I shower? No, really. WHERE DO I SHOWER???) No worries, I’ve got all your answers right here.

Jump to: Travel – Shelter & Showers – Food & WaterEverything Else


Assuming that you’re not driving to the race, Monterey Regional Airport is the closest airport to Lake San Antonio … but doesn’t seem to serve direct flights from Denver. Given that, your best bet is to fly into San Jose Airport, although San Francisco and Oakland are also decent options. You’ll need to rent a car, as the race site is not Uber-able from the airport. Don’t want to deal with flying with your bike and then having to rent an enormous, expensive SUV? ProBike Express, your local bike concierge, will offer bike + bag + tent + anything else you need transport services if there is sufficient interest; TriBike Transport serves the race as well.

Plan for a 2-1/2 to 3 hour drive from the airport down to Lake San Antonio, but make sure to buffer an extra 30-60 minutes to stop for provisions along the way (see “Food & Water” below). Your best bet is to hit up Salinas, which is about halfway from San Jose Airport to Lake San Antonio and serves as a convenient place to stock up on supplies for the weekend. There’s a Costco, a Walmart, a Target, and a Safeway, so between the four you should be able to find pretty much everything you need. There’s also an In-N-Out Burger in Salinas, and if you don’t stop and get a double-double animal style, we’re going to have a serious conversation about your priorities.

If you find yourself 15 minutes south of Salinas and realize you forgot the key ingredient for your famous campfire mac-n-cheese, you can stop at the Safeway in King City, which is about an hour outside of Lake San Antonio. For real this is the last place to find provisions, so check your list twice before driving off.

Finally, you’ll want to plan your trip timing around the road closures within Lake San Antonio Park. All roads in the park are closed on Saturday from 7am-3pm and on Sunday from 8am-3pm. Regardless of what race you’re eyeing, plan to arrive no later than Friday and leave late Sunday afternoon. (Already made travel arrangements that conflict with road closures? You can park at North Shore campground and take a boat shuttle to/from the race site.)

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There are a myriad of great lodging options available for Wildflower, as long as you’re not dead set on turn down service and a chocolate on your pillow: there are no hotels to be found anywhere near the race site. Here’s what is available:

Camping is available at a number of campgrounds surrounding the Lake. You can lock in advance reservations HERE. Individual spaces are first-come-first-served, so if you’re picky about locations, plan to arrive at the race site on Thursday rather than Friday. Camping is $25/person/night for everyone over 16.

RV parking is available at the campgrounds as well with the same logistics and pricing as tent camping. (The limited number of RV spots with hookups are, unfortunately, sold out.) You can bring your own RV or you can arrange to have one delivered to the campsite if a two-day drive each way doesn’t fit your schedule.

While sadly the super-cool Tinker Tins are sold out for 2018, there is still limited available for the Bell Tents (think: Glamping), at $950 for the full three nights. If you like the idea of camping but want to add a little civility, or just back support, to the weekend, I’d jump on these quickly – more info HERE.

For all of these lodging options, standard campground bathrooms should typically be no more than a few hundred yards away. Some of these will have showers, some won’t, so get the lay of the land ahead of time and strategize shower timing to avoid the crowds.

If you really can’t get past the idea of a private, hot shower, AirBnB and VRBO are great sources for rentals surrounding Lake San Antonio, and there are hotels in nearby Paso Robles, approximately 35 miles from the Lake. If you do stay outside the park, keep those Saturday and Sunday road closure times in mind, and plan to pay the $10/person/day Festival pass rates upon entering the Park.

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This is the area where your advance planning skills really get tested. You do want to think through ALL of your food and drink needs prior to heading to Wildflower for the weekend.

• Water – Yes, you need to bring your own water. Maybe a half gallon per day per person? Maybe even a smidge more to account for race day requirements.

• Race Fueling – Breakfast / pre-race nutrition; Race nutrition; Post-race nutrition. If it’s a powder-based product, make sure you’ll have sufficient water AND sufficient clean water bottles. If it’s real food, see next item …

• Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner – How many days? What do you want to eat? How are you going to cook it? How are you going to store it? If you’re going to cook, you’ll need to bring your own skillet, pots, plates and utensils, and be sure to grab a cooler – styrofoam or the real deal – when you stop for provisions. You can grab ice, firewood, and lighter fluid at the small, very basic, general store onsite.

• Want to restock mid-weekend? In addition to the small, onsite store, Oak Hill Market is roughly 15 minutes outside the park and is about the best general store there is: quality meats, great produce, wine, barbecue supplies, eggs, and a great deli. (There’s also a gas station here – the nearest one I believe – if you are running low!)

• Don’t want to cook over a fire? – Welcome to my world. Thankfully we won’t be left to starve – there will be a wide variety of food trucks at the festival all weekend, and they will mostly be serving healthy/gourmet food rather than traditional carnival food truck fare. Save for your 5am pre-race meal, the food trucks will have you covered. Pro tip: TriCalifornia is exploring a cashless system for festival vendors, including food trucks. Keep an eye out for more info on their website and Facebook page!

• Must. Have. Pasta. – No duh. There’s a pasta party Friday night. Did you really think they’d leave you hanging? Tickets will be available online starting in Mid-March ($12 adults / $6 under 16) and you can buy tickets onsite if that’s more your style ($14 / $8), but only those who buy tickets in advance get a second serving.

• But what about coffee??? – Yup, they thought of that too. Nate Dressel, former pro triathlete, will be there with his new venture, Frontier Coffee. Just be prepared to stand in a long line if your morning routine involves anything incorporating the word “latte.”

And if reading all that just gave you an enormous headache, there are a limited number of $200 VIP packages remaining that cover breakfast, lunch and dinner for the entire weekend. You can add this option to your campground reservation, Bell Tent reservation, or pre-purchased Festival day pass upon checkout through

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So then … Travel: Check. Shelter: Check. Showers: Check. Food & Water: Check. …


You’ve sorted through the headache of a race venue where everything – literally, EVERYTHING – is BYO. So now what? TIME TO PARTY!!! Just kidding. Well, not really. Pretty much the whole point of Wildflower is that it’s not just a race, it’s an entire weekend of awesomeness. And to experience all of this awesomeness properly, it’s going to require just a little more advance preparation.

First off, in the weeks leading into the Wildflower Experience weekend, TriCalifornia is going to release the official Wildflower app. (Yup, there’s an app for that.) Given the very limited cell service at Lake San Antonio – no, I would not anticipate any wifi hotspots – you’ll want to download this app before race weekend. Then, while you still have cell service, make sure the maps and shuttle schedules are loaded, and review the race weekend schedule. Within the app you can reserve spots for activities and services – as in: post-race massages and pedicures – and you’ll want to do this before race weekend.

Minus scheduling your massage, you can take advantage of much of the race weekend awesomeness on a more spontaneous basis. Plan for lots of time hanging around the campsite – pack your Eno hammock, or consider grabbing a cheap-o lawn chair at Walmart to enable this activity. But do wander off from your campsite at some point and check out the Festival: bands will be playing throughout the day on Saturday and Sunday, there will be local artisan tents and helicopter tours (only $99 – if I weren’t terrified of helicopters I’d say this sounds like a steal), there’s an art bar where you can paint and drink wine (this is more my speed), and you can rent paddle boards and kayaks anytime outside of race swim windows. And yes, beer and wine will be flowing all weekend long.

As if all that weren’t enough, there is a 5k run at the Redonda Vista campground on Saturday night (think: pre- or post-race shake out run) that ends with an 80’s dance party, sponsored by Clif Bar. Seriously: AN 80’S DANCE PARTY. I mean, I thought I was excited about the Wildflower Experience when I signed up – now I don’t even care about the race. I just want to go to the 80’s dance party.

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More info about the races (long and short course tri’s – both on-road and off-road, 10k, 5k, trail run, and SUP races) HERE and registration HERE.

Make a reservation for camping or a Bell Tent HERE.

Check out the full weekend schedule HERE.

Weekend Preview: Snowy Fun

Triathlon Events

Saturday Feb. 24th


Chilly Cheeks Duathlon Series – Race #3


Vail Nordic Center Winter Triathlon


Cycling Events

Friday Feb. 23rd


Pastries on the Path


USA Cycling Elite BMX National Championships

Oldsmar, Fl

Saturday Feb. 24th


MADHORN Fat Bike Races


Sunday Feb. 25th


MADHORN Fat Bike Races


Stauton Blizzard Fat Bike Race


2017 IRONMAN Athlete Choice Awards

As you plan your 2018 season, who better to consult than your fellow athletes? Our annual athlete surveys tell the story best: using the information we gather from YOU, our community, we are proud to present our top 10 IRONMAN and 70.3 events events across a variety of categories. Read on for the places and communities that will get you excited to race this year—whether you’re looking for a pristine swim, a memorable post-race party, or a bike course that will leave you drooling.

Categories include: 

Overall Satisfaction

Overall Swim

Overall Bike

Overall Run

Best Race Venue

Best Host City Experience

Best Post-Race Celebration

Will Attend Next Year

Will Recommend to a Friend


How did your favorite race fare?

Complete 140.6 results here

Complete 70.3 results here




When Multisport and Politics Collide: Athletes Speak Out on Gun Control

U.S. biathletes, who shoot guns to compete, speak out on gun control for America

From The Chicago Tribune

For his profession, Lowell Bailey wears a .22 caliber rifle strapped to his back. It has taken him across the world and to four Olympic Games, most recently to the biathlon mixed relay Tuesday night at Alpensia Biathlon Centre, where he skied the anchor leg for a United States team that finished 15th. His sport and his livelihood revolve around shooting. His competitors from other countries often wonder about his country’s relationship with guns…

Read the full story