48 Seconds

Blog by Emily Harvey, intro by Sasha Underwood, accomplished athlete and 303 Ambassador

 

When Emily Harvey first asked me to be her handler for her first Ironman, without hesitation I said yes. What an honor to be a part of her team and Ironman debut. I first met Emily at the Achilles Monday night run group at Washington Park about five years ago where I was guiding visually-impaired athletes. Achilles is an inclusive group that welcomes all abilities and I have had the opportunity to meet the most wonderful people being a part of that group. What I first noticed about Emily was her awesome connection in helping a teenager my son’s same age, who has some cognitive challenges, to focus and have fun running. Of course I noticed her super fancy cool running leg. Little did know that one day I would be spending so much time with those legs of hers.

Then, it was around 2014, when I was training for Boulder IM that she started training for her first triathlon. We both swam at the same pool and I used to tell her all the time that she was training for a full Ironman with the training schedule she had. Most of the time we had very similar swim workouts in terms of distance. 2015 I had to give up Ironman racing and running because of hip surgery. Any chance I can get to still be a part of the action I jump on and in 2016 Emily asked me to be her handler at the Boulder 70.3 which was her second half Ironman.

Here are a few quick bullet points from my perspective on how the day went and below is Emily’s race review. I have retold her story several times and I still get chills thinking about how deep she dug to make the cutoff time!

What whirlwind of a weekend handling Emily Harvey’s legs during Ironman Boulder as she experienced the following:

1. Mechanical failure on the bike; when her DI2 shifters stopped working and she was stuck in her big ring from mile 24 through 112…

 

2. Forgot her running shoe for her walking leg so I gave her my running shoes (slightly too big for her) and I wore my water shoes for a few miles until she switched into her running leg.
However, it was on the run that I came up with my new handler name as I was running with Emily carrying two of her legs in a backpack: Leggy Blonde 😂. When I guide visually-impaired athletes I’m The Blonde Leading the Blind but that doesn’t work for being a handler. Glad we figured that out so I can sleep at night lol..

3. Her watch died and didn’t know her pace – and all of us supporting her thought she had until midnight to finish – it wasn’t until 10 minutes before her official cutoff time that Jeannete Sorensen Hickok (thank god for Jeannete) said she only had 10 minutes to get there… her predicted time was 11minutes …. frantically I texted her coach and he saw her with 1:15 (one minute fifteen seconds) before her cut off and he yelled at her to sprint !!

And holy cow did she sprint…..
I think I almost passed out from holding my breath for over a minute as she sprinted down the finishing chute with 48 seconds to spare..

So many emotions – Of all the Ironman races I’ve done – this one, being Emily’s handler, tops them all… everyone participating has a story from last weeks, but Emily wins Best Story for First Time Ironman in my opinion 🙂

Congrats again Emily! You’ve got more grit than anyone I know!! YOU ARE AN IRONMAN!!


48 Seconds

Emily Harvey IRONMAN Boulder post race blog

 

I FINISHED THE BOULDER IRONMAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I am still telling this to myself over and over today because I still don’t believe it, and I still look at an Ironman as an insurmountable feat even though I just did one yesterday.  I think it’s going to take a while for the gravity of what I just accomplished to sink in, and for me to believe it actually happened…  It was just a crazy and amazing day, and I hope you enjoyed the updates Sasha was posting on my Facebook page all day, but I also wanted to share my written perspective of the experience because I think there are many lessons about life woven into my day yesterday.

 

 

Pre-Race

I was up at 3:00 AM to eat because it always take me a while to choke down my breakfast and we needed to leave between 3:45 – 4:00 AM to catch the shuttle to the reservoir.  Per my usual on race morning, I ate my breakfast and promptly threw half of it back up.  This is standard procedure for me on race morning and I always feel a million times better once it happens, so I rolled with it and took it as a good sign that my body was pumped for the day.

Zach, Sasha, and I headed out of the hotel, dropped off our special needs bags at the High School (thank you Jeannene Gonzales for grabbing those for us!), and jumped on a shuttle to the reservoir.  The moon was a bright orange sliver, and Sasha thought it looked like a toenail.  I always appreciate Sasha’s humor (even at 4:00 AM) because somehow it helps calm my nerves.  Sasha also offered entertainment because she was wearing the backpack with my legs sticking out of it and inadvertently tapped the guy in the seat in front of us with one of my legs.  He was a little befuddled…

 

We got to the reservoir and made our final preparations for transitions and walked through which leg would be where at what point in the race and how Sasha would assist me in changing legs for each phase.  Once we had that all worked out, we headed over to the swim start so I could get into my wetsuit in time for the 6:10 AM start.  I drank a quick nutrition mix to make up for throwing my breakfast and then just relaxed by the swim start for a bit to calm the nerves.  I was not as nervous as I expected, but was more excited than anything else.  The day I’ve been looking forward to since I signed up for Ironman last September had finally arrived.  I truly did feel like a kid on Christmas morning.

 

 

The Swim

The PC (physically challenged) athletes get to start at the back of the wave with the female pros, so that is pretty dang cool.  We all got in the water and next thing I know it’s 1 minute to go, 30 seconds to go, and BANG!, the cannon goes off and we’re all off into the water.  I always get excited at the beginning of the swim because it’s my favorite part of the whole day, and it’s hard for me to hold back.  However, my Coach and I had talked about being smart and not pushing myself in the water because it was going to be a long day and it wasn’t worth shaving 5 seconds per 100 meter off my time.  I got into a great rhythm and just kept going from buoy to buoy at a steady pace I knew I could maintain without gassing myself.  It took until the first turn about 1/3 of the way through the swim before I started getting passed by the fastest age groupers, so I had a lot of time to just swim in the open water basically by myself.  I only freaked out and thought I was being attacked by sea monsters a few times when some water plant latched onto my arm, but I kept my cool and shook it off and kept swimming.  I came out of the water around an hour and 23 minutes, which was right on pace for my day’s goals.  Sasha helped me get to my towel, strip my wetsuit, and throw on my running leg so I could go through the changing tent to get ready for the bike.  I was in heaven because my day was, to this point, going just as planned.

T1

In the first transition, Sasha and a volunteer helped me get out of my swim gear and changed into my bike gear.  I had gone back on forth as to whether to wear tri bottoms or my bike skirt from Skirt Sports and ultimately decided on the skirt, throwing any judgement of others regarding my choice out the window because that skirt is ridiculously comfortable and 112 miles is a long time on the bike.  I saw one other lady in a skirt out on the bike, so we were basically beauty queens out there, haha.  After changing, I ran to my bike where my bike leg was waiting, switched legs, and ran out of transition to start the bike.

 

 

The Bike

My plan on the bike was to stay steady, maintain a 14-15 mph average, and finish in 8 hours or less – a major part of this was making sure I didn’t push too hard and completely destroy my legs before the run.  All was going well until mile 24 of 112 when my Di2 electronic shifters decided that despite fully charging them on Thursday, they were going to attempt to sabotage my day by refusing to work… at all.  For those of you not familiar with bikes, this means I could not shift into a different gear in the front or back and was stuck in the gear I was in when they quit for the day.  What gear was I in, you ask?  Well, the big ring in the front and the 3rd ring down in the back – this is a great gear for flats and slight downhills.  It is not good for going uphill, especially not big hills like some of those on the course yesterday.  As soon as I realized what was happening, I had a flash of an idea to quit, but kept riding (I was going downhill) and thought about a story Nicole DeBoom told about being in a race when her saddle broke and she freakin’ made it work to finish the race.

It took A LOT of self-talk to get myself through the next 32 miles when I reached the halfway point, and I’m sure some of the people passing me thought I was crazy for not shifting and because I was talking to myself out loud to get through it (C’mon Emily, you can’t quit now; Woman up, Emily, you can freakin’ do this; stupid bike, you aren’t going to sabotage me today, I am going to do this race whether you like it or not… and so on).  At the halfway point, I saw Sash and Coach Mark and had a brief meltdown about my situation, but they encouraged me to keep going AND SO I KEPT GOING.

 

Complete blog here

Behind the Lens at IRONMAN Boulder

By Khem Suthiwan

As a four-time IRONMAN finisher, I’ve really enjoyed being on the other side of the proverbial “fence.” Not only does it give you a way to experience the race without all the training, but the change in perspective gives you a true appreciation of all the moving parts that makes race day happen.

Being behind the lens and capturing so many special moments, you realize there are stories with each grimace, smile, sigh, and hug. One by one as they crossed the finish line, I couldn’t help think about how they’ve been through hell and back…and not just on race day. But every day since the submit button on the registration form was pushed. Because of this I feel some level of responsibility in capturing as many moments as I can, and because of this I thought it would be a good idea to put these thoughts to paper (well, the internet in this case) and share with you all some things I’ve learned and experienced as an amateur race photographer. So here are a few considerations, including some that I’ve shared with the athletes I coach, for the next time you race, spectate, or volunteer at an event.

This guy clearly didn’t get the memo regarding finish line smiles
See! This guy knows how to smile!

Smile. Especially if a camera is pointed at you. You’ll soon forget about all the pain, even if it’s for a quick moment. Otherwise, you’ll have this not so pleasant look in all your race photos and someone will probably hijack it and incorporate it in a meme, or ship you some Metamucil for Christmas. You don’t want that, do you?

Finish Line Catchers. If you’re waiting for your person at the finish line, give them a few moments alone in the spotlight to celebrate their accomplishment before rushing in to hug them. They’ve earned it. Plus, your backside will be forever etched in your friend’s finish line photo, ruining a perfect moment they spent the last 6-8 months training for. Don’t be a dream killer. There were a few times I just gave up and couldn’t take any photos because there were so many people congregating with an athlete. More is not always better in this situation. A volunteer actually heard an athlete tell their friend who was hugging her while jumping up and down, “I’m going to throw up on you if you don’t get off me.” So there’s that potential biological hazard to worry about too.

Sprinting to the Finish Line. Athletes, before you get to the finish line, look in front and behind you. Allow the person in front to have their 5 seconds of fame. Don’t go sprinting to the finish (which means you had way too much gas left in the tank, but that’s a different discussion). You’ll end up ruining finish line photos of two people. Your fellow athlete and YOURS! In this case, photo-bombing is not cool, so don’t do it. Unless you’re okay with being THAT guy…or in my case, that girl from Japan who sprinted past me in the finish line chute in Kona only to hear Mike Reilly call my name first, and then hers as an afterthought because she couldn’t wait. She will be forever known as THAT girl. Choose wisely folks.

This guy, partied a little too much at the finish line. Last call was 2 hours ago. Nice photo bomb buddy.  #FacePalm (pictured here – Meredith Botnick)

Celebrate and Get Out of the Way! If there’s another athlete finishing behind you, be courteous and do your end-zone touchdown dance and clear out. The person behind you should also have the opportunity to celebrate their finish…WITHOUT you in their picture. A set of triplets crossed the finish line at IRONMAN Boulder and spent what seemed like an eternity dancing around the finish line arch. A friend of mine along with several other athletes, were completely robbed of their finish line moment because of these three guys. She was only planning on racing one IRONMAN, so there’s no redo. Thanks guys, thanks a lot.

Distractions. There is nothing more fun at a race than seeing so many friends out racing and spectating. However, there is a time and place for catching up. Working media at a race is an entirely different beast. Not only are we tracking our own friends, but we are also keeping tabs on professional and notable athletes. Time is of essence and we are constantly looking at our watches and athlete trackers. Figuring out where to be and what part of the course. Sometimes we have a short window to use the restroom or grab a quick bite. If we seem distracted and not paying attention to you, it’s not because we don’t care. We have a job to do and don’t want to miss out on capturing special race moments. At IRONMAN Boulder, each Colorado-based athlete had a 303 sticker on their race bib (we hope to continue this tradition). Our mission was to take as many photos of these athletes along with many others. Being ready to point and shoot while two people are chattering in each ear takes sensory overload to a different level.

This is what happens when you leave the Garmin alone. An awesome finish line photo! (pictured here – Justin Maples)

Look Up and Leave the Garmin ALONE! No one on Strava is going to care that your Garmin went over by 20 seconds. Your official finish time will be based on your timing chip, not your GPS tracking device. And if you are wearing a cap or visor, look up. We can’t see your pretty/handsome face if you are looking down at the ground. There’s nothing there but red carpet, concrete, and puddles of puke from the last person whose friend wouldn’t stop jumping up and down and hugging him. Eyes up folks!

Even with all these tips, sometimes the best photos are those capturing the human spirit. You might think you look awful, but someone else might be inspired by that image. Try to look beyond the ratty hair, salt stained clothing, and sunburnt limbs. Because behind that crusty and rough exterior is an awesome story of how that person woke up one day and decided they were going to be an IRONMAN.

You have one shot at an epic finish line photo. Aaron Pendergraft obviously has a lot of practice perfecting this valuable skill. Way to go Aaron!!!

Khem Suthiwan is a 4-time IRONMAN finisher (Canada, Lake Tahoe, Arizona, and Kona), triathlon coach with Mile High Multisport, IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador Athlete, and staff content editor/media correspondent with 303 Endurance Network. In addition to triathlon, she also races for the Palmares Racing cycling team in road and cyclocross. She’s an avid skier, SCUBA dives, and as a Colorado resident since January 2001 – enjoys all things Colorado. On December 31, 2017, she reached Everest Base Camp (elev. 17,600′, 5,380m) after trekking for 8 days in Nepal. If she’s not racing, you can find her out on the course supporting her friends.

How Bike Cameras Can Help Cyclists

Have you been thinking about getting a camera for your bike but don’t know which one to buy?

Check out these bike camera reviews on CyclingTips.com and learn the value of video footage in collision investigations and court cases according to #TheCyclistLawyer:

“Most law enforcement offices I’ve talked with say this evidence is hugely helpful to them in their collision investigation so long as footage does show the face of the driver. Of course, any other info like the car make/model/plates and the location, timestamps, etc all play a role in the investigation as well. But imagine a collision with no witnesses and a cyclist who is knocked unconscious… the video can be so powerful. It can make the case.”


I recently got the following note:

“Megan, we met several times at different lectures. It’s always reassuring to know you have cyclists back. My question is more for my information and if ever needed your benefit.

Concerning riding with a GoPro. If I have only one camera to use while riding which mounting do you find most useful in court – 1) back view of the bike from the seat post, 2) front view of the bike on the handle bars, or 3) front view of the bike on the rider’s helmet?

Also, I’m wondering if you have any feedback on having the camera on the back – will motorists see it there and tend to think twice before passing the rider?

In this day and age I don’t believe you can have enough leverage in a dispute.

Thanks for your time – I hope to never need your services. Sounds weird.”

Great questions. Let’s discuss the placement of the camera if a rider only has one, and cannot place both a front-racing and rear-facing camera. (Because yes, two cameras can be quite expensive).

There is no truly right or wrong answer to this question, it’s more a strategic decision by the rider. Based on our firm’s caseload over the years, the vast majority of cases we handle are of three types (which also jive with the state and national bike crash stats):

  1. Motorist makes left turn directly in front of/into the oncoming cyclist (failure to yield on left turn)
  2. Motorist makes right turn from a position parallel to the cyclist, either into the bike or directly in front of the cyclist (right hook)
  3. Motorist strikes cyclist from behind/side swipes cyclist from behind (does not allow proper passing distance/3 feet/fails to see cyclist at all/impaired/distracted driving)

 

Complete post from Roadbikereview.com here

Check out these bike camera reviews on CyclingTips.com

Rudy Project Announces Project Podium

Denver CO – Rudy Project North America, exclusive distributor of Italian-made endurance sports gear, and the most worn helmet at Kona 7 times in a row, is launching Project Podium, an initiative that rewards North America’s fastest age group triathletes with award-winning performance Rudy Project eyewear and helmets. All age group racers that win their age group in any sanctioned long distance triathlon in the United States and Canada are eligible to receive a free, top-of-the-line Rudy Project Boost 01 road aero helmet and pair of Tralyx sunglasses. Winners will also be featured on Rudy Project’s website, and lauded on social media as the top long distance age group triathletes on the continent.

“A full-distance, 140 mile plus race is nothing to sneeze at, and attempting one is a feat in of itself,” said Paul Craig, Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Rudy Project North America. “To win your age group, to come out on top, is something exceptional, and we want to reward the best, with the best.”

The program is open to all age group triathletes that compete in a sanctioned long distance triathlon race, in Canada or the United States, that is included in Project Podium’s list of eligible races.  “Rudy Project is simply the best,” said Paul Craig. “We’re choosing to celebrate athletes who power the sport – the age group athlete, and rewarding those that get to the top, the pinnacle of success. It may seem too good to be true, but we’re serious. If you win your age group in one of our listed races, we want to give you a helmet and sunglasses. If that extra push is all it takes to motivate someone to train a little harder, run a little faster down the chute toward the finish line, then we’ve done our job.”

Winning athletes can submit their information and race results for verification online here. Athletes that won their age group in any 2018 full distance triathlon prior to the announcement of the program are also eligible to redeem retroactively. Full terms and conditions of the initiative can be found online here. as well as a full list of eligible races. The program will run until December of 2018.

 

Weekend Preview: Early Edition

Triathlon Events

Thursday June 7th

 

BAM OWS

Boulder


SwimLabs Grant Ranch OWS

Littleton


IRONMAN Boulder – Ride with the Pros

Boulder


Stroke & Stride: Week #2

Boulder


The Man with the Halo – Tim Don Documentary

Boulder


Nottingham Lake OWS

Avon


Friday June 8th

 

Boulder Underpants Run

Boulder


Saturday June 9th

 

Mt Evans Ascent

Idaho Springs


USAT Off-Road National Championships

Waco, TX


Sunday June 10th

 

IRONMAN Boulder

Boulder


USAT Clydesdale & Athena National Championships

Grand Rapids, MI



Cycling Events

Thursday June 7th

 

BVV Thursday Night Racing

Erie


West Longmont Cruiser Ride

Longmont


Friday June 8th

 

GoPro Mountain Enduro

Vail


Saturday June 9th

 

Ride the Rockies

Breckenridge, Edwards, Steamboat Springs, Grand Lake and Winter Park


Gowdy Grinder

Laramie, WY


Salida Big Friggin’ Loop

Salida


Death Ride Tour

Silverton, Telluride, Durango


Lookout Mountain Hill Climb

Golden


EPIC Singletrack Series: Granby Ranch

Winter Park


Scott Enduro Cup Series: Angle Fire

Angle Fire, NM


Women’s No Drop Road Ride – Liv Summer Vibes

Boulder


Coffee + Bicycles with the Founders of  THESIS

Boulder


The Palmer Divide – CANCELLED

Palmer


Sunday June 10th

 

Ride the Rockies

Breckenridge, Edwards, Steamboat Springs, Grand Lake and Winter Park


Scott Enduro Cup Series: Angle Fire

Angle Fire, NM


Death Ride Tour

Silverton, Telluride, Durango

Tri Coach Tuesday: Crowie brings camp to Boulder

Craig Alexander announces special training camp Jun 15-17

Overview
To advance, to move forward to become better and build a higher-level understanding. Sansego wants to help you advance your triathlon

skill set by bringing 3x Ironman World Champion Craig Alexander and our team of coaches to you for an intensive, three-day training program. The Sansego Advance is built for all levels of triathletes, from beginner to advanced as the program will be focused on developing you into a better athlete.

As a father, husband, businessman and athlete, Crowie has felt the same pressures you do in balancing family, a career and your passion for the sport of triathlon. The Sansego Advance program provides an opportunity to train with Crowie and get expert guidance from the Sansego team of coaches in a three-day program offered in major cities across the US. Instead of taking a week off work and away from family to go to a training camp, you can join us during the day, sleep in your own bed and spend time with your family, all without having to take time off work.

For this program, you’ll have the chance to train with Crowie in his second home of Boulder, Colorado, the mecca of triathlon. You’ll experience some classic training routes of the top Ironman pros and see a day in the life of a pro living in Boulder.

June 15-17
Boulder, Colorado
University of Colorado Athletic Complex

Designed for all levels of athlete
– 3-day Advance program means less time away from work and family
– Train with 3x Ironman World Champion Craig Alexander
– Get 1 on 1 feedback from the team of coaches at Sansego
– Opportunity to meet other athletes in your area with the same level of commitment to the sport Learn new skills in all three disciplines as well as nutrition and mental aspects of racing
– Locations and Dates
– Cost and Participants
– $350 usd per Advance Weekend 25 participants maximum

Included:
-Coaching support and guidance from the Sansego team -Great swag from Crowie’s sponsors
-1 on 1 coaching sessions with Sansego coaches
-Dinner event with Craig Alexander
Boulder Advance Program

Tentative Program Agenda:

Friday

9:00am Arrival to Camp and Start of Program 10:00am Bike Session on Boulder IM course
1:00pm Lunch Break
2:30pm Swim session with video analysis (CU Pool) 4:00pm Strength training presentation with Crowie 5:30pm Training Presentation with Sansego Coaches

6:30pm Dinner on Your Own

Saturday

7:00am Depart for long bike ride (60m with climbing)
12:30pm Lunch break (provided)
1:00pm Bike Set-up presentation (Ivan O’Gorman)
2:30pm Swim session with video
4:00pm Performance Nutrition Presentation with Sansego Coaches 6:00pm Dinner with Crowie (Rubens)

Sunday
7:00am Long Run (1.5hrs) – Creek Path? 8:30am Breakfast Break (on own) 10:00am Recovery/ Skills Bike Ride 11:30am Final Skills Presentation 12:30pm Camp Wrap-up
1:00pm Depart Camp

Additional Services we could provide:

-Massage
-Retul Bike fit with Ivan O’Gorman

 

Register Here

Cyclist hit by a car May 8th—the whole story now…

by Bill Plock

Triny Willerton is a cyclist/triathlete hit by a car on May 8th. She survived and is recovering and the story written by the Boulder Daily Camera and partially published here on 303cycling was inaccurate. After questioning Triny, the police re-questioned the driver when she was able to tell her story and he admitted his original story wasn’t accurate….the investigation is still on-going….

“Any doubts I ever had about the existence of God are now completely gone,” says Triny after being hit by a car on Nelson road on May 8th, exactly one year to the day, and in the exact same location that took the life of Charles Crenshaw. More on that coincidence in a moment.

But first, what really happened to Triny. She was hit by motorist carelessly passing her on the left, on the opposite side of the road, on the other side of the double yellow line, as she made a legal left turn north onto 65th from Nelson road. That is what happened.

The initial story posted by the Boulder Daily Camera and shared here on on 303cycling was incorrect—or at least incomplete. The initial reports based on a false account from the driver, were simply false. It was stated that Triny made a left turn onto 65th from Nelson and that she tried to execute that turn from the shoulder on the right side of the road and turned into an on coming vehicle. That was what the driver originally told police and as is often the case in a bike/car collision, physical evidence is often disturbed by people moving the bike out of the way or other debris that can provide crucial clues as to what happened.

Triny was rushed to the hospital and didn’t have a chance to tell her side of the story at the scene and authorities seemingly filed an initial accident report based on the drivers story alone. But then when State Patrol Trooper Lewis came to Triny’s home a week later to get her statement and started to recreate the scene, it become evident the driver wasn’t telling the truth.

The driver was then confronted with Triny’s recollection and changed his story. There were two witnesses to the crash that had circumstantial evidence to also support Triny’s side of the story.

Triny was actually in the middle of the Nelson Road turning left (north) onto 65th. She had signaled to do so and had legally taken the lane. The driver, reportedly speeding by one of the witnesses who was passed by the driver minutes earlier further west on Nelson, came upon Triny turning. Rather than slow down and properly yield to her turning and pass safely on the right, he decided to cross double yellow lines and pass her on her left as she turned left. Unbelievable really. She was traveling east but was hit on the westbound side of Nelson and flung onto the roadway. It’s not clear where the vehicle struck her and her bike.

 

The driver did stop, as did two other vehicles, both traveling eastbound and both ironically nurses. One was driven by a close friend of Charles Crenshaw who was on her way to lay flowers on the white bike memorializing the spot of his death exactly a year prior. Triny is convinced that Charles is now her guardian angel. 911 was called, an ambulance arrived and she was rushed to the hospital.

It doesn’t appear either vehicle saw the collision directly. But they can substantiate they did not see Triny in the shoulder trying to turn clear across the road and they can attest that she was hit on the westbound side of Nelson road.

This accident is still being investigated and Triny is dealing with her injuries and trying to recover. She is grasping with knowing she was within inches of dying. She is an experienced cyclist and was training for the upcoming Ironman Boulder and looking at her beat up bike and with broken parts and pieces, she still doesn’t understand how she survived.

Not only is she dealing with injuries that prevent her from riding her bike and even walking normally, she has had to deal with being falsely accused of causing the crash. Having to constantly defend herself and rid this shadow of fault while coping with survivors guilt and rehabilitating her injuries is exhausting and mentally defeating at times.

But, this all begs the question of why many crashes involving cyclists and drivers are falsely reported. The fingers can be pointed many directions and at many people. In this case, a false initial testimony with a rush in the media to get the “story out” is the primary cause of the incorrect story. We at 303 feel bad in not doing our due diligence either.

So often the evidence is moved before the investigation can begin. Unfortunately many times, cyclists don’t survive to tell the story. Bikes don’t fair well versus vehicles clearly, so it’s not easy to always determine what happened simply with comparing damage to a car caused by a bike. Lets be honest, there also can be a bias that the cyclist did something to cause the crash. Cyclists can sometimes be their own worst enemy when it comes to a certain bias that can happen as well. Erratic behavior and not following traffic laws can sometimes lead to assumptions that cyclists may have broken a road rule leading to the accident.

303cycling recently published several stories by Adelaide Perr ( linked here and here) who recounted a similar experience a few years ago and shared how the false initial report happened and how that hindered her recovery and reconciliation of fault and expenses. There can be a break down of information passed on between police and the media and often resources aren’t available for adequate follow up and so often we as media move on the next story.

But what’s left in the wake of these crashes is life changing (or life taking) for all involved and a bike/motorist crash deserves the same treatment as any other collision.

Look for a future article on how we as cyclist can prepare ourselves for the best possible outcome if we are hit or endangered by a motorist. Also look for ideas on how to prevent being hit with equipment such as lighting and clothing. There are steps to take at an accident that can make a big difference on the investigation. There are also insurance options that can help this financially painful experience. There are specific cycling insurance products that are critical that most cyclists probably don’t know exist.

 

Colorado’s New Stop-As-Yield Legislation

by Megan & Maureen, Hottman Law, The Cyclist Lawyer

 

Bicycle Operation Approaching Intersection

Concerning the regulation of bicycles approaching intersections.

On May 3, 2018, Colorado Governor Hickenlooper signed into law SB144, or what’s commonly referred to as the Idaho stop, also known as a safety or rolling stop or “stop as yield.” In effect in Idaho since 1982, the law allows cyclists to treat a stop sign like a yield sign and a red light like a stop sign. In 2017, Delaware adopted a limited stop as yield law.

Interestingly, the new Colorado law isn’t actually a state law – it’s recommended language, which each individual city or county may now adopt at its option.

C.R.S § 42-4-1412.5 provides a statewide standard on the regulation of bicycles approaching intersections which local governments can choose to implement:  Idaho stops were already legal in Aspen, Breckenridge and Dillon, as well as Summit County, prior to the passage of this new law.

(1) At intersections with stop signs, a cyclist should slow “to a reasonable speed and yield the right-of-way to any traffic or pedestrian in or approaching the intersection.” The cyclist may then turn or go through the intersection without stopping.

A reasonable speed is considered 15 mph or less. Local governments may reduce or increase the reasonable speed but will be required to post signs at intersections stating the lower or higher speed limitations.

(2) At red traffic lights, cyclists are required to completely stop and yield to traffic and pedestrians. Once the cyclist has yielded, they may “cautiously proceed in the same direction through the intersection or make a right-hand turn. A cyclist may not go through the intersection at a red light if an oncoming vehicle is turning or preparing to turn left in front of the person.”

The law further states that a cyclist may only make a left-hand turn at a red traffic light if turning onto a one-way street. The cyclist must stop and then yield to traffic and pedestrians before turning left. NOTE: It is not legal for a cyclist to make a left-hand turn onto a two-lane road (one lane in each direction) at an intersection with a red traffic light.

 

Original article here

303Beginner Tri Project: Race Day 101

 

by Coach Alison Freeman

You’ve been training for weeks and weeks, and the big day is finally just around the corner! Here are some tips to help with race day … starting a few days ahead of time.

 

One Week Before the Race

– Stay on top of your hydration levels from now all the way until race day.

– Trust your training! You’ve worked hard to prepare for the race, and at this point you’re not going to add any fitness that will benefit you on race day. Resist the urge to squeeze in an extra / long workout and just rest up for race day.

– Check your bike over to ensure that key components – tires, brakes, and shifters in particular – are functioning properly. If you come upon some items in need of repair, or don’t feel comfortable doing the assessment yourself, your local bike shop is typically happy to help! They may need to keep your bike for a day or two, so make sure to head there earlier in the week rather than later.

– Review the USAT Race Day Checklist – download here – and confirm that you have everything you need for race day. If not, now’s the time to go get it!

 

Two Days Before the Race

– Don’t do anything too strenuous – no big hikes, re-landscaping your yard, cleaning out the basement, etc. Just rest!

– Get a good night’s sleep! This night is actually more important than the night before the race.

 

The Day Before the Race

– Stay off your feet and out of the sun as much as possible. Rest, rest, rest!

– If available, pick up your race packet today rather than waiting for race morning. Review everything in the packet and make sure you know what it’s all used for.

– Referencing the USAT Race Day Checklist, pack all your gear for race day – a duffel bag or milk crate works well for packing. If you have them, put your race numbers on your bike, helmet, and t-shirt / race belt. Lay out your clothing for race morning.

– Review the race course and other provided race information, particularly the race start time, swim waves, and when transition will close pre-race.

– Create a schedule for race morning (see below). Prep your breakfast ahead of time.

– Eat some good carbs throughout the day, but eat a moderate sized dinner.

– Pump up your tires.

– Go to sleep early, but don’t panic if you don’t sleep well. That’s normal! And why you got a good night’s sleep two nights before the race.

 

Race Morning

– Eat a nice breakfast, ideally 3 hours before race start: carbs and a little protein is perfect.

– Leave for the race in time to arrive at the race site approximately 90 minutes before race start. Even earlier if you need to search for parking and/or pick up your race packet.

– Park, grab all your gear and your bike, and head to transition. Get body marked – typically: race numbers sharpied on your arms and your USAT age (age as of 12/31) on your calf – as you enter transition (so cool!).

– Find your transition spot based on your race number, and set up transition – all the info on transition can be found here.

– Scope out the transition layout – find swim in, bike out, bike in, and run out (exactly what they sound like!), and locate your transition spot relative to these entry and exit points. For many races, you can mark your bike rack and/or transition spot with a helium balloon or sidewalk chalk.

– Visit the port o’ potty! For real, include this in your race morning timeline – you’ll need to hit the potty, and there’s usually a 10 minute line for them!

– Put on your wetsuit AFTER you’ve hit the port o’ potty. Allow about 15 minutes to get this done, it’s a workout in and of itself.

– If you’re able to get in the water, warm up for 5-15 minutes.

– Plan to be finished with your “race morning routine” 15 minutes before the race start. There is often a pre-race briefing that you’ll want to listen to.

 

Race Execution

THE SWIM

– Place yourself appropriately at the swim start based on your swim ability and comfort in open water. If you’re a strong swimmer, place yourself up front so you have a clear line to the first swim buoy. If you’re more moderately paced or uncomfortable in open water, I recommend an outside corner start location.

– The beginning of the swim usually involves a little contact! Try not to panic – tread water if you’re flustered, and look around for some open water where you can swim cleanly.

– You may start really fast due to excitement and quickly get out of breath. Again, don’t panic! Switch strokes for a bit if that’s helpful, focus on getting your breathing under control, and “just keep swimming.”

– The fastest way to finish the swim is to swim straight! Sight the next swim buoy every 8-10 strokes, and make sure you find the next buoy after completing each turn.

TRANSITION (T1)

– Stay focused and methodical: wetsuit, cap, and goggles off; helmet, sunglasses, shoes, and socks on. Grab your bike and go!

– Remember to place your discarded gear in your transition area. It’s a shared spaced, and fellow participants need room for their stuff too.

BIKE

– Woohoo! You finished the swim. Be proud!

– Remember to take in plenty of water, and potentially some fueling, on the bike. A reminder of hydration and fueling can be found here.

– Stay safe! Cars are present on many bike courses, and fellow participants appreciate a nice “on your left” when being passed.

– Aid stations can get a little congested – signal to your fellow participants if you’re slowing or stopping, and be mindful of others doing the same.

– Thank the volunteers! The race can’t happen without them.

– Save some energy for the run!

TRANSITION (T2)

– Once again, stay focused and methodical: rack your bike; helmet and bike shoes off; run shoes on. Grab your hat (and race belt if you’re using one) and go!

RUN

– Don’t start out too fast! This is one of the most common errors in race execution. Be very mindful of your pace for the first mile.

– Be sure to get some water or sports drink at each aid station.

– Don’t be shy about taking walk breaks if you need them. Aid stations are a great place for that.

– Thank some more volunteers!

– Encourage your fellow participants! You’ll get back twice the positive energy that you put out on the race course.

– And most of all, ENJOY THE FINISHER’S CHUTE! Smile, and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. You earned it!

Tim Don Documentary – Man with the Halo

A VALIANT “IRONMAN” HITS THE ROAD TO RECOVERY
FORMER TRIATHLON WORLD CHAMPION, TIM DON, EMBARKS ON A
JOURNEY OF FEARLESS OPTIMISM IN THE FACE OF ADVERSITY

Documentary on the tragic and heroic story of “The Man with the Halo” to premiere at the Boulder Theater in Boulder, CO for the first time in the U.S. on June 7th, 2018.

BOULDER, COLORADO – The legendary three-time Olympian, former triathlon World Champion and Ironman World Record holder, Tim Don, can only be described as the embodiment of pure fortitude, strength and willpower, after surviving a near-fatal road accident that was feared to bring a sudden end to his esteemed career just days before heading to the Ironman World Championships in October last year.

For the first time since his catastrophic setback, the Swiss sportswear company, On, together with Emmy award-winning director, Andrew Hinton, are revealing Tim’s remarkable story in a compelling short form documentary that chronicles his courageous comeback journey along the road to recovery. The highly anticipated and inspirational film, entitled “The Man with the Halo,” is planned for worldwide release on May 28th at www.ManwiththeHalo.com. This release date also commemorates the 1-year Anniversary of Tim’s world record-breaking performance during the 2017 Ironman South American Championships in Florianopolis, Brazil. The film will premiere for the first time ever in the U.S. in Tim’s current hometown of Boulder, CO at the Boulder Theater on June 7 th, 2018.

In the beginning of 2018, following an excruciating three-month period of mental and physical recovery resulting from a severely broken neck, doctors ordered the removal of Tim’s medical halo – the circular metallic support structure fixed directly into his skull. This marked the start of an intense chapter of rehabilitation, fueled by a fierce determination to rebuild himself as the world’s preeminent Ironman. Tim set his sights on his first comeback race – competing at this year’s Boston Marathon in April. Almost six months to the day after the accident, Tim remarkably finished in 2 hours and 49 minutes, just five minutes more than the marathon leg of his record-setting race at the 2017 Ironman South American Championships in Brazil.

“At On, we take pride in sponsoring not just athletes, but their human spirit,” says Olivier Bernhard, cofounder of the Swiss sportswear company. “Tim’s unwavering optimism in the face of adversity is a natural extension of our brand values. Once his pursuit of the Ironman World Championship slipped away following the crash in 2017, we wanted to create an alternative platform of recognition for Tim.

We put together a world-class production team to chronicle his recovery, and reached out to our
network to generate as much groundswell as possible around his comeback race at the Boston
Marathon. Our short form documentary will arguably generate an equally momentous spotlight to suffice any World Championship title. We are delighted to commemorate the 1-year Anniversary of Tim’s world record-breaking performance with a compelling story of undisputable heroism.”

On May 28th, 2017, at the age of 39 years old, Tim Don became the fastest Ironman triathlete of all time after breaking the World Record (previously set by Lionel Sanders) by four minutes, at a time of 7:40:23, during the Ironman South American Championships in Brazil. Tim was in the best shape of his life and continued to train relentlessly for October’s Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii, for which he was considered a favorite. While cycling during his final training preparations days before the event, Tim collided with a vehicle and broke a vertebra in his neck, forcing him to make an arduous decision about his future and the best method for long-term recovery. Due to the option of neck surgery giving extreme limitations to his eventual range of motion, Tim decided to wear a halo – the most torturous alternative – but one that would ensure complete recovery, enabling him to return to his 20-year career competing with the best in the world.

“After watching such a well produced documentary with my wife and reliving the ordeal we all went through, it’s evident how much stronger and resilient these gruelling experiences make you,” says Tim.

“Looking back on the last six months has made me realize that my injury was not just a career setback but a serious learning experience about the appreciation one can have towards such a nurturing and dedicated support structure during difficult times. I have been very fortunate and realize how the severity of my injury was shared between everyone around me and how we all carried an equal burden at one point or another. It was awesome to be back in the race environment at Boston, pinning the number on and being in the start corral with everyone. It’s what I worked so hard for over the last six months.”

Tim suffered for nearly four agonizing months at his home in Boulder, Colorado – not being able to shave, shower or dress himself. He became entirely dependent on his wife Kelly, who would often have to clean around the metal of the halo to prevent infection and reduce the swelling where the pins were screwed into his forehead. Tim was on a heavy dose of prescription painkillers that would often add to the problem with frequent vomiting. For three weeks he was upright in a chair in a corner of his living room, unable to sleep for more than 90 minutes at a time. The entire right side of his body became black from bruising and swelling with his ankles becoming swollen despite his compression socks.

As Tim slowly came off the painkillers, he was determined to move beyond the confines of his metal halo and fight for a competitive comeback. He called upon his physiotherapist, John Dennis, who had worked with Tim for over a decade during his competitive career. John was among the first to fly out from the UK to Colorado to supervise the rehabilitation program Tim was eager to start while still wearing the halo. With his upper body strength restricted by the device, John worked with Tim to regain mobility, strength and stability in his lower body. As the exercises became more intense, the screws in Tim’s halo would often come loose and have to be tightened. Eventually the halo was replaced with a large collar allowing for more variation during the workouts over time. Tim was focused and positive throughout the recovery process, which was helped by having goals such as the Boston Marathon and ultimately, a return to the World Championships in Kona.

On April 16th, six months after he was almost crippled for life, Tim took to the 2018 Boston Marathon. Despite the driving rain and temperatures close to freezing, Tim finished in under 2 hours and 50 minutes. A week before the marathon in April, Tim was up to 20 hours of training, compared to his typical 30 hours prior to the injury, although the race helped give him closure on a wound that nearly derailed his career indefinitely. The finish line in Boston marks the beginning of Tim’s long road to recovery. He plans to compete at the Ironman Triathlon European Championship in Hamburg on July 29th, before making a grand entrance as a returning frontrunner in October at the 2018 Ironman World Championships in Hawaii,

The new documentary entitled “The Man with the Halo,” chronicling Tim Don’s road to recovery, is produced by On, together with Emmy award-winning director, Andrew Hinton. The worldwide release date on May 28th marks the 1-year Anniversary of Tim Don’s world record-breaking performance during the Ironman South American Championships in Brazil. The documentary will be publicly available to watch on www.ManwiththeHalo.com.