Weekend Preview: Big Saturday

Triathlon Events

Thursday December 7th

 

Old Man Winter Kick Off Party

Boulder


Saturday December 9th

 

IRONMAN Team Colorado

Louisville

 

Join us at the IRONMAN HQ in Louisville for a run and then stay to watch the NBC broadcast 2017 IRONMAN World Championship race in Kona.  Colorado to Kona athlete Tom Bogan will be on site to chat about his amazing opportunity to race in Kona and his passion for the sport.  We will be making a donation to IM HQ neighbors and wonderful community members, Community Food Share, so please bring canned food items to donate.


Chilly Cheeks Duathlon Series Race #1

Denver


Longmont Lights Holiday Parade

Longmont


Sweaty Sweater Run

Ft. Collins



Cycling Events

Thursday December 7th

 

Draft: Colorado Holiday Meetup

Boulder


Old Man Winter Kick Off Party

Boulder


Saturday December 9th

 

Colorado State CX Championships

Westminster


Longmont Lights Holiday Parade

Longmont


Sunday December 10th

 

Colorado State CX Championships

Westminster

Tri Coach Tuesday: Planning Your Next Season

A SIMPLE GUIDE TO PLANNING YOUR RACE SEASON

 

Since we are at the start of a new year, and many athletes are looking into the races and events they would like to do for the year, I thought I’d share some guidelines to go by when you start planning your race season.

 

Identify Your Season Goal

Typically we want to have some kind of goal each year for our event season. It might simply be to finish a marathon, or participate in a local race series. Or perhaps it’s get a personal best at a specific race. If this isn’t your first race season, what did you achieve in the previous season, and how would you like to improve?

 

When you finish the year or season, what do you want to say you’ve accomplished?

Once your season goal(s) is/are identified, then take a look at the following things.

 

Budget

Not just race entry costs, but travel, lodging, additional bike servicing, etc. You want to make sure the racing is in your budget, or there could be some unnecessary stress for you and/or your family!

 

Schedule

Map your planned events out on a calendar with other events in your life.

Do your chosen events fit with other known dates such as work travel and vacations? You want to make sure you will feel prepared going into a race, so for example, an A race immediately after a sedentary vacation may not be a good idea.

 

Realistic for Training

  • Do you have the time to commit for the training and recovery needed?
  • Are you willing to put in the required training?

 

If you’re not sure what will be required, ask a coach!

 

Are your events appropriate for fitness experience?

While some people jump into a marathon or full iron-distance event their very first season, it may not be the best thing. If it’s not necessarily appropriate, but you want to do it anyway, make sure you can commit to the training and that your expectations are realistic.

Answer the question: “Why do I want to do this race?

This is important to know for every race – when you put money down for an entry, have a reason! It can just be a training race, or to race with friends, but have a reason for it.

Ask Yourself: “Do I need help reaching my season goal?” 

 

If you already work with a coach, they should be already involved in your goal setting process. They may not pick your events specifically, but they can help vett your choices to make sure they fit in some of the above. If you don’t, I have room in my schedule for a few more athletes. I’d love to help you this season! (contact me here)

 

Working through the above items and looking at your season as a whole can help make sure you have a healthy and enjoyable event season!

 

Original post on Coach Nicole’s blog here

 

Coach Nicole is a great coach.  If you’re looking for additional coaching options, check out the 303Triathlon Coaches Directory here

303Radio: Tom Bogan, Amazing Fortitude in Kona

Nobody embraced the opportunity to race Kona more than Colorado’s Tom Bogan. He is on crusade to make sure everyone knows dreams can come true and listen to how close it was that he didn’t get to try and achieve his. His story of almost not racing due to a last second misplacement of a key item is almost as amazing as his story of getting there in the first place!

 

 

This episode sponsored by Coeur Sports

AN EVENING OF CHAMPIONS AND INSPIRATION: ANNUAL IRONMAN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP BROADCAST PREMIERE

Event to take place on December 5th at New World Stages in New York City with proceeds supporting The IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund

TAMPA, Fla. (Nov. 28, 2017) — On Tuesday, December 5, 2017, IRONMAN and The IRONMAN Foundation will host an “Evening of Champions and Inspiration” at the IRONMAN® World Championship Broadcast Premiere presented by UnitedHealthcare, taking place at New World Stages in New York City. Sharing the hosting duties for the evening’s affair will be “The Voice of IRONMAN” and this year’s IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador Team Captain, Mike Reilly along with veteran national sports broadcaster and multiple IRONMAN® 70.3® finisher Shannon Spake, as they introduce guests to the magic of the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship, which took place on October 14 in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i.

The red-carpet gala will feature a premiere screening of the annual NBC broadcast that captures the fierce competition and compelling storylines of the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship and a moderated Q&A panel from athletes featured in the show. Event attendees will get a first look at the broadcast special before it airs on NBC, December 9th from 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. ET (check local listings for time and channel).

The event will also include food and cocktails and a meet-and-greet with inspirational age-group athletes as well as current and former professional athletes. 2017 IRONMAN World Champion Patrick Lange will be joined by top American finishers Heather Jackson, Andy Potts, Liz Lyles and Ben Hoffman and IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador athlete Tim O’Donnell. Special guests will include original 1978 IRONMAN finisher Dave Orlowski as well as renowned sports commentator and long-time narrator of the NBC Show, Al Trautwig.

“We are excited to return to New York City to screen the IRONMAN World Championship NBC special ahead of its premiere on December 9th. Every year this broadcast special gives viewers an extraordinary view into a truly amazing event and this year’s IRONMAN World Championship is no exception,” said Christopher Stadler, Chief Marketing Officer for IRONMAN. “We are honored to work with The IRONMAN Foundation as we continue to grow this red-carpet event and silent auction to a larger audience than we have ever had before.”

The IRONMAN Foundation, the charitable arm of the IRONMAN organization, has provided more than $50 million in support since inception. Proceeds from the evening will benefit The IRONMAN Foundation’s Community Fund, which provides grant funding to nonprofit organizations in race communities where IRONMAN events are held.

In addition to the funds raised from the event’s ticket sales, The IRONMAN Foundation will hold a silent auction with a variety of unique items including this year’s IRONMAN World Championship finish line tapes, Hawaiian Ukuleles autographed by Professional IRONMAN athletes, and tickets to a Broadway Musical, just to name a few. Online bidding will begin on Wednesday, Nov. 29 and is open to event attendees and the general public by visiting the following link – IRONMAN Foundation Silent Auction.

There will also be an opportunity to bid during the live auction at the premiere on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to race at the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i as well as the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa.

“The IRONMAN Foundation is honored to benefit from this event, which exemplifies excellence and inspiration in the sport of triathlon. Funds raised will allow us to continue to leave a tangible impact in the communities where IRONMAN events are held across the world,” said David Deschenes, Executive Director of The IRONMAN Foundation.

For more information and to purchase tickets to the event, please visit www.ironmanfoundation.org/konapremiere/. For more information on IRONMAN and The IRONMAN Foundation, please visit www.ironman.com and www.ironmanfoundation.org. For media related inquiries, please contact press@ironman.com.

The SALT in your Sweat: The Nitty Gritty of Sodium Testing

By Dana Willett

As multi-sport athletes, we’ve pretty much all heard about the importance of salt – sodium – electrolytes – during endurance activities, especially in hot weather.

But how much? And what kind? And how often?

The go-to “test” most athletes are familiar with is a sweat rate test – weigh yourself before exercise, go hard for an hour, weigh yourself again, and do the math on how much fluid you lose (details below). Then load up with any of the many sports drinks out on the market, and try to consume close to the amount you normally sweat out.

BUT. So many different products. And they all affect our guts in different ways.

Salts and minerals that can conduct electrical impulses in the body. Common human electrolytes are sodium chloride, potassium, calcium, and sodium bicarbonate. Electrolytes control the fluid balance of the body and are important in muscle contraction, energy generation, and almost every major biochemical reaction in the body. –From Medical Dictionary

And, perhaps more importantly, the concentration of sodium in your sweat is as important to understand and utilize as your sweat rate.

My coach has recommended I use the current off season to tackle any testing and nutrition questions, so I have plenty of time over the winter and spring to integrate any changes and trial-and-error any new products. I’ve had year-over-year trouble with gut issues and muscle cramping, so salt intake is at the top of my list.

I checked in with resident expert Ryan Ignatz at Colorado Multisport, who agreed, saying, “Now is a good time to consider Sodium Composition Testing since people have more time and can start implementing their new knowledge with their bigger indoor workouts. Often we see people just drink water when they ride inside through the winter, which can actually create a bit of issue in their sodium balance after a few workouts.”

I booked an appointment at CMS for the sweat test and was surprised to learn no workout was involved. This test can be done any time, with no exercise-induced sweat necessary.

I sat comfortably in a chair, and Ryan applied a small disk to my forearm, secured with a strap.

The disk is equipped with a type of electrode that promotes a sweat reaction on the skin just below the disk.

The sweat is collected in a tiny coil of tubing inside another disk called a macroduct; once enough sweat has been collected, Ryan withdraws the fluid using a syringe and analyzes it with the Precision Hydration machine.

And just like that it’s confirmed – I am a salty sweater!

I’m in the “high” category, bordering on “very high.”

I need 1331mg of sodium for every liter of sweat that I lose.

Levels of sodium loss fall anywhere between 200mg or 2200 mg  – but the proportion each individual loses stays the same (except for hyponutremia, a condition caused by overhydrating with plain water – without sodium – and water diluting the blood stream). Thus, each athlete’s sodium concentration level is individual, similar to a blood type or VO2 max… it’s yours for life, and it does not change.

When I do a traditional sweat test (see below), I lose two pounds over an hour – so I basically need at least a full liter of fluid and 1200-1300mg of sodium for every hour of racing. Plus 200-300 calories an hour.

The immediacy, and accuracy of this data is quite reassuring, especially given my history.

During my last full Ironman, I suffered kidney trouble. I was using a well-respected endurance formula (“exclusive blend… all the electrolytes an endurance athlete needs… no need to supplement with salt tablets...”). I consumed 24 oz an hour, 240 calories, 334mg of sodium – not nearly enough sodium for me.

Unknowingly, hour after hour, I was about 1000mg shy of meeting my sodium needs, compounding every 60 minutes. Plus I supplemented with some extra water – which only further diluted my blood sodium level. No wonder mid-way through the day my kidneys weren’t working well, and after the event I experienced mild rhabdomyolysis .

The key is the sodium concentration in your sweat, and your sports drink.

Ryan reassures me, underlining the importance of ratios over quantity: “Its more about the concentration of sodium in the fluid you drink – it’s not only about how many milligrams per hour, because that varies depending upon different conditions, such as intensity, temperature, etc.; both your sodium concentration, and sweat rate are important. You need to drink to thirst, and make sure your drink contains the correct sodium concentration – that is what is important.”

Determining those formulas ahead of time is the key to solid hydration: Ryan says to look at packages, and really read the labels. “If Gatorade Endurance is on course, look at those sodium levels ahead of time and consider how much you’ll need.” Another thing to consider is everyday nutrition, and sodium intake during training sessions. “Athletes who train regularly and eat ‘clean’ tend to not add salt, and may not get enough in their everyday diet,” Ryan adds – another reason to dial in sodium levels to ensure training fluids are the proper concentration.

The next part of the sweat test included reviewing the leading products on the market, factoring the sodium levels, and taking into account past gut-checks, calories, delivery method (salt capsules, stick-licks, powders, etc.).

When you study the variety of offerings, you might be surprised. For example,  Endurolytes by Hammer – whose name indicates a product appropriate for endurance events (“Electrolyte replenishment done right“) – has only 40mg of sodium per capsule.

Do the math… for me, needing 1300mg of sodium per hour, I would need 32.5 capsules every hour. Thirty-two+ pills. Every hour.

There are different types of salt… Sodium Citrate is not as strong tasting… and Sodium chloride is table salt.

Ryan suggests drinking to thirst, and then separating your carbohydrates/calories from your fueling. He recommends dialing in your hydration: “Make sure everything that you drink has a certain concentration of electrolyte – that way, no matter what amount you drink, you always have the best ratio of sodium to fluid for your personal body chemistry. ”

Base salt… Boulder salt… Salt Stick… what’s the difference? “Mostly method of delivery,” Ryan says. “From a salt shaker kind of delivery, where you lick the dispenser, to capsules, under the tongue delivery (bypassing the stomach), to a canister with a scoop for mixing with fluid.” Other things to consider are packaging (key when you’re trying to ingest while in the aerobars or carrying on the run), and cost. Some offer better ability to measure intake-specific doses.

What if you find yourself on a course, your unsure of your sodium needs, and salt is being offered? Ryan says, if in doubt, take it. “Most of the time it’s probably a benefit because most people aren’t doing enough.”

“When we exercise the number one job the body has is to cool itself – through sweat,” Ryan points out. “It will do that above just about anything else. Sodium concentration is key to this process.”

One final point from Ryan: “Drinking to schedule can work against you – drinking to thirst, with proper ratio of electrolyte to fluid, is the best practice.” And, “Always, always, check the math!”

Contact Colorado Multisport to book your Sodium Composition Test. The cost us normally $129 – mention this article and 303Triathlon for a 10% discount plus 10% back through December 31, 2017!

A certificate for the test can make a great gift for the triathlete in your life.

RELATED:

Tri Hearter: Science In Your Life?

 

Your standard sweat check procedure is:

  1. Check your weight before and after training, and calculate weight loss.
  2. Convert any weight loss to ounces or ml of fluid.
  3. Check/measure the amount of fluid consumed during training.
  4. Add the amount of fluid lost to the amount of fluid consumed to get total fluid losses.
  5. Divide the total amount of fluid lost by the number of hours of training to get fluid losses per hour.
Originally from Ironman

AmpTriLife Interviews Boulder’s Craig Towler: Adapting & Giving Back

From Amp Tri Life

For this blog I interviewed Craig Towler, who started an organization called the Amputee Concierge in order to help people find answers to their questions and connect them with resources following limb loss. I first heard about Craig shortly after the incident that lead to amputation of his legs happened, and was recently connected with him through my friend Nicole DeBoom. Craig is extremely insightful about amputation and life in general, so I hope you enjoy reading the thoughts that he was gracious enough to share below.

Can you talk a little about when and how you were injured?

My amputation was the result of an intoxicated driver on July 4, 2016. I made it home after putting on a 10k/5k run at the Boulder Reservoir to unload my vehicle. I was excited to go celebrate the 4th of July with friends and watch fireworks. Just as I was about to finish unloading, I felt an impact that pushed me into the back of my vehicle, and before I knew what had happened I looked down and saw both of my legs detached. I immediately knew my life was in danger, and action had to be taken immediately for me to survive. I was in tremendous shock at the time, but I remember everything very vividly. I was standing behind the tailgate of my SUV when I felt the impact, and I was pushed into the back of it with my legs hanging out the back. Shortly after the impact, people who were nearby at the time came to my assistance and called for an ambulance. I instructed them to help me lay flat on the ground. To this day, I’m still not sure how I had the mindset that I did, but my thoughts were very clear, and I knew exactly what needed to happen if I did not want to die. Once I was on the ground, I could see the amount of blood that I was losing, and I was losing it very quickly. I then instructed the people around me to remove their belts, and secure them as tightly as possible to my upper legs above the injury to work as a make-shift tourniquet. I later learned from the doctors that the tourniquets had stayed on my legs until I entered surgery hours later, and are the reason that I am alive today. I was taken to the local hospital near my house, and was then air lifted to another hospital with a more advanced trauma unit. Once there, I underwent 5 surgeries throughout the course of the week involving the amputation of both of my legs. One is below the knee, and the other is through the knee. Skin grafts were also taken from both of my upper legs to close the wounds. I was in intensive care for over a week.

What sort of familiarity did you have with the amputee/disability/adaptive community prior to your injury?

Prior to my injury I was not very involved with the adaptive community. Through my work with race production I saw some amazing adaptive athletes compete, as well as worked with a few organizations like Athletes in Tandem, and the Challenged Athletes Foundation.

What sorts of thoughts went through your mind the first few months following amputation?

A lot of thoughts were going through my mind. In the beginning, everything was happening so quickly it was hard to comprehend what was really happening. Everything changed in a split second. When such a large change takes place without any warning or preparation I think it takes a while to come to terms with the new reality…

Read the full article

Tri Coach Tuesday: Getting a Coach, Am I Worth It?

by D3 Multisport Mental Skills Coach, Will Murray

Triathletes invest in their sport time, effort, emotion, and funds.  You invest in running and cycling shoes, a bike, swim goggles and a wetsuit for starters.  Then you may shell out for a Garmin device, a lactic threshold test and a blood test to check for micronutrients and balanced physiology.

Some athletes believe that their absolutely most important investment is in a smart, competent, experienced and supportive coach, who writes your training plan, provides race advice, works through your emerging issues, keeps you injury-free and has your back.

Sometimes, as an athlete, you might have doubts whether if it’s worth all this investment. Or, more truly, have doubts that you are worth the investment. This doubt can be temporary.  You have one disappointing track session, but the next day your tempo run goes fine, and the doubt shrinks in the rearview mirror.  But sometimes these doubts are more deep and stubborn.

Masters swimming: “Oh, I don’t swim well enough to take up lane space from the real swimmers.” Group runs: “Oh, they don’t want somebody like me slowing things down.” Group rides: “What if I get dropped?” A coach: “A coach, for me? I’m nobody. I’m not the kind of person who deserves a coach. I’m not good enough.”

If any of these prickly little phrases sounds familiar, don’t fret. There are answers.

Preparation

The technique below requires work.  You actually must do the steps, as though you were with your coach and she is expecting you to carry out the instructions.  When you are doing a swim workout, you actually must swim and not just read about swimming—you follow the coach’s direction.  To get ready to do the next steps, round up a pencil and paper (not optional).  Take your time. I’ll wait until you are ready.  Now?  Okay, let’s go.

Step 1. Articulate your goals and reasons for doing triathlon.

You may be striving for a healthy lifestyle and general fitness.  If you have aspirations beyond this, such as finishing a longer distance race, achieving a personal record or qualifying for a championship race, having a clear, written goal statement is indispensable.  You already know the trick—write your goal statement (e.g. qualify for USA Triathlon Age Group Nationals) on a piece of paper and stick it to your refrigerator or your bathroom mirror.

Step 2.  Ask yourself, in the privacy of your own mind, “Am I worthy enough to pursue that goal?”

Notice carefully any response you get.  If no response, wait a few moments, then ask, quietly, the question again.

Step 3.  Notice whose voice is answering the question.

Carefully listen, not so much to the answer, but to the voice providing the response.  Is it your voice?  Or someone else’s voice? Or a blend, a small chorus of different voices?  Notice carefully who does this sound like?  When you have a clear sense of who is answering your question go to the next step.

Step 4a.  If the voice is someone else’s ask, “What is your positive intention for me?”

Wait for a response.  If the response makes sense to you, great.  If not, ask, “What is important about that?”  Wait for an answer.  Keep asking this same question, “What is important about that?” until you get an answer that makes sense to you.  Thank the voice each time you get a response.  Go to Step 6.

Step 4b.  If the responding voice is your voice ask “What is your positive intention for me?”

Wait for a response.  If the response makes sense to you, great.  If not, ask, “What is important about that?”  Wait for an answer.  Keep asking this same question, “What is important about that?” until you get an answer that makes sense to you.  Thank the voice each time you get a response.

Step 5.  Ask the responding voice, “How old are you?” and notice the response.

If the responding voice is younger than your present chronological age, ask this (exactly as stated here): “Without giving anything up, and while keeping everything you have, would you like to gain all the experience and wisdom available to you to advance to [your current age] or beyond?”  If the response is positive, allow the part to grow up to your current age and ask it to tell you when it is done.

Step 6.  Imagine your next big event.

This could be a key workout session, a race, or even that masters swim that you have been putting off.  See yourself, over there, performing exactly as you wish you would.  Start a color movie at the beginning and run it to the end of this event. Make this image run perfectly, as you are the director and you can have the image run exactly to your desires.

If the image runs well, run it again in fast motion so that it takes five or ten seconds total.

Step 7.  Return to the responding voice in Step 4 and ask, “Do you have any objection to having the image run that way?”

If there are no objections, your work is finished.  If you receive objections, repeat Step 4.

Conclusion 

The way you make progress toward your goals is to stretch and pursue improvements.  The way you pursue is to recognize the worth in the pursuit, and the worth in you.  The way you do that is to act as if you are worth it, that you truly do deserve it, and then go do what a deserving person would do.

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate.  Our fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.  It is our light, not our darkness, that frightens us.  We ask ourselves, ‘Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?  Who am I not?’”  Marianne Williamson

Original post on D3Multisport.com here

Here are coaching options.  303Triathlon Coaching Directory

Winner of Tickets to the IRONMAN World Championship Broadcast Premiere Announced

With so many entries, this was a tough decision but ultimately there can only be one winner.

And the winning entry goes to…Barry Faust of Orefield, PA!!!!

Big thank you to all who submitted their awesome stories about how IRONMAN has changed their lives for the better! There are still a few tickets available to the Broadcast Premiere Viewing Party and you can purchase them here.

Here is Barry’s winning entry:

I participated in my first triathlon, a local sprint August 2007, on my 29th wedding anniversary.  August 2009, I completed my first Ironman event:  Ironman Louisville, and I was hooked. Since then I have completed (4) other Ironman events and (15) 70.3’s., highlighted by IM 70.3 World Championship in Zell am See, with my wife Cindy.I truly agree Ironman is a lifestyle, In 2016, I joined Team BllueLine racing.  We race to raise awareness and money for the families of law enforcement officers killed or seriously injured in the line of duty.  In 2016 we went to cheer other team members participating in IM Chattanooga, and had the opportunity to meet the Freeman family, whose husband was killed in the line of duty May 2016.  We met the family:  wife – Jessica, her mother – Tammy, children – Braden and Blaiklyn.  It was truly an amazing experience bonding with 8-year-old Blaiklyn and developing a relationship with the family that exists today so strong.  They believe we are a silver lining in their tragic event, and I say they have so changed my outlook on life.  And I have Ironman to thank for that.  Each race Team BlueLine members cross the finish line with the BlueLine flag honoring law enforcement officers.  I said I met the family in Chattanooga and bonded with Baiklyn during the race and while waiting during the race she taught me to do cartwheels.  In honor of her I finish each race with the flag and a cartwheel at the finish line.  I am 60 years old and doing a cartwheel alone is hard enough but after an Ironman event “Anything is Possible”

I turned 60 this past January and I had this crazy idea that I would do (4) Ironmans and (3) 70.3’s.  Ironman – Boulder, Mt Tremblant, Chattanooga, and Cozumel.  70.3’s – Texas, Muncie and Lake Placid, and work on my way to a legacy spot in the future.  I was able to complete IM 70.3 Texas, IM Boulder, IM 70.3 Muncie, before I started to develop severe pain in my hips.  It is because of training and Ironman I think I still have a good prognosis.  Since having the hip pain, I obtained a MRI and was diagnosed as having Bone Cancer, which originated in my Kidney and metastasized into the bones.  If not for having the pain in the hips from training I would never have known the tumor on the kidney was growing and could have been a silent killer.  I have since had the kidney and tumor removed and am receiving treatment for the bone cancer.  I am hoping after treatment to get back to training and continue participating in Ironman events.  On November 15, 2017 I received results from recent CAT Scan indicating progress with the treatment, where significant new healing bone growth was shown in the spots where cancer had been observed.  I am registered for Ironman Lake Placid in 2018 and probably will be deferring to 2019, but I also am registered for Ironman 70.3 Lake Placid in 2018 and hope to be able to participate.

I truly believe the Ironman lifestyle and having a goal to get back to Ironman is a true blessing. 

I close in saying Thank you.  “ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE”
Barry L. Faust

Forget Triathlons. It’s Time for Aquabike.

From the Wall Street Journal

For triathletes who hate the running part, there’s a new sport that offers a path to glory

Kathleen A. Hughes competed in the ITU Aquabike World Championships earlier this year in Penticton, British Columbia. Photo: FinisherPix.com

When I proudly told friends that I had qualified for the world championships in aquabike this past August, at age 60, I faced blank stares and concerned questions.

“How does the bike move in the water?”

“Do you practice on a stationary bike in the pool?” my brother-in-law asked.

The answer is that aquabike is a relatively new sport in triathlon, a race that normally includes a swim, bike and run. In aquabike, you get to skip the run.

While races vary, the most common distance is a 1.2-mile swim and a 56-mile bike ride. “Swim, bike, done,” enthusiasts say.

While the number of participants in triathlons has declined in the past few years, aquabike is growing rapidly, partly by appealing to older athletes with running injuries.

“It’s growing like a weed,” says Chuck Graziano, a director of USA Triathlon who has a titanium knee and competes in aquabike. “It doesn’t include the pounding of running. It can be age-related, injury-related, or people who just prefer not to run.”

Indeed, the number of aquabike races sanctioned by USA Triathlon, the sport’s governing body, has more than doubled in five years to 562 races with 5,160 aquabikers last year.

Read the full article

Flashback Friday – On Assignment: Dave Christen at IRONMAN Arizona 2016

With over 130 athletes from Colorado racing IRONMAN Arizona this weekend, we went digging in the 303 archives to resurrect this awesome mini-documentary of a day in the life of Dave Christen at IRONMAN Arizona 2016, courtesy of Kenny Withrow. Enjoy!