Report: Boulder’s Newton Running cofounder out, reorg underway

The Newton Running Store is shown here on Pearl Street in this file photo. ( Cliff Grassmick / Staff Photographer )

From the Times Call

Newton Running, which abruptly closed its flagship Pearl Street Mall store last month, has launched a major reorganization which includes the departure of its cofounder Danny Abshire, according to a report in Runner’s World.

The report was confirmed by company spokesman Michael Doyle.

Doyle said cofounder and investor Jerry Lee has returned to lead the venture as chairman of the board temporarily.

“We don’t know what the long-term plan is,” said Doyle, but he confirmed that the company’s primary financial backer, Fireman Capital Partners, is no longer involved and that company executives are in the process of forming a new investor group.

The Daily Camera reported the store closure March 31.

“the street retail scene proved a tough one to make profitable”

Read the full story

Dash-n-Dine Race Recap: Fun is Key

By Cheri Felix

Now that we’ve completed Dash & Dine #1, here is my race report. Mine might be different than the usual race report (as if anyone else went home to write in their Dash & Dine diary).

Easy. I signed up a long time ago so all I needed to do was pick up my bib. Keep your bib. It’s your bib for the series. That’s slick. Now all I have to do is show up. No waiting in line. Now I have more port-o-potty time.

Warmup. Matt from Revolution Running lead us in a FREE coached warmup. First we ran and then we did drills. It was my first coached warm up and I’ll admit, my first real warm up. Matt was nice and helpful. It was fun. And he’ll be there again next Tuesday.

Fun. I want to be very clear. I am not that person who says “I’m just out here to have fun. I don’t care about my time.” That’s not me. I do care about my time. I want to get faster and stronger. Of course, at some point I won’t get faster, things will level out. But for now, there’s room for improvement. But it does have to be fun. Even after childbirth they handed me a beautiful baby. Suffering is fine as long as it’s served with a side of fun. Friends, kind spectators, food afterwards and a welcoming finish line; all ingredients for a fun evening.

My time. Okay, here it is. My time was 14 seconds slower than my fastest time last year. Which means I am 14 seconds slower than my peak time which was at the END of the Dash & Dine 5k series. The good news is that my last mile was faster than my first two. Can I go out a few seconds faster on the first mile without losing it? Can I go a bit faster on the second mile if there is no headwind this time? Maybe. Or maybe #2 will just be slower. What then? Who knows. Perhaps that’s part of why we line up. It’s an unknown and in this life of immediately knowing whatever we need to know whenever we need to know it (goodbye microfiche, hello Google) we line up not knowing how it will all work out. And like when some of us get married or take our car into the shop, we hope for the best.

Honesty. I’ll be honest. There are some people out there that are fast. Like 18, 19, 20 minute 5k fast. You can’t see me, but I’m clapping for them. For the rest of us, we line up, we run and we finish. Our time is our time. It’s a number on a clock. It’s not a statement about who you are as a person. It’s not a determinate of how long you’ll live or how much you will be loved. It’s not a hint as to how nice you are or how you will be remembered. It’s a number and it’s your number.

I hope you’ll come out for the next Dash & Dine on Tuesday. I’ll be there and I’ll probably be talking loudly at the start and laughing at the finish. If you need a pep talk, come find me.

See you there!

Boulder Coach Neal Henderson on Babbitville Radio

“Combination of the practical and scientific application in working with athletes to help them be better, be faster, be able to do what they do healthier and more sustainably.”

Coach Neal joined Bob Babbitt on Babbitville radio discussing topics such as Leomo, coaching methodology, the hour record, and much more!

Neal Henderson

Do you Strava? Join Team Colorado & win prizes!

Boulder, Colorado, USA – Mike Ricci & Jim Hallberg: D3 Multisport

Author: Bill Plock

Do you Strava? Yet another verb in our language morphing from a website (i.e. googling). Join the Team Colorado Strava group and you can be eligible to win prizes for completing the D3 Multisport segment within the Ironman Boulder bike route. The segment essentially starts at 63rd and Nelson Rd., heads West to highway 36, then North to St. Vrain and East to 65th and south back to Nelson Rd.

D3 and some of their partners including; Rudy Project, Infinit, Colorado Nutrition, Pro Bike Express, and Lock Laces will be giving away products to athletes who complete the D3 segment in the month of April. You need to join the Team Colorado Strava group to be eligible—and ride your bike between Arpil 7th and April 30th—that’s it! Click here to join

This isn’t about coveted KOM or QOM’s (king and queen of the mountain) but rather participating. Team Colorado is initiative started by Ironman Boulder to build a stronger community feel at their race in June. It’s morphing to be an inclusive group encouraging athletes to be more engaging and have fun training. All clubs, athletes, groups and individuals are welcome at events.

Most of the prizes will be given at the Team Colorado picnic scheduled for Sunday afternoon on April 30th at the Ironman office/warehouse in Louisville. There, food and beverages will be available along with some great advice from experts of D3 Multisport along with other fun events and a chance to see some of the behind the scene happenings on how a triathlon is put together. The Ironman warehouse in Boulder is the staging place for everything needed for all of their North American events. Families will be encourage to join the picnic!

The Sprint Work Stand by Feedback Sports : No More Grease Stains on My Carpet When I Change a Tire?

By Alison Freeman

You know when you’ve been struggling with something over and over and over again, and you get so used to clunky and difficult and annoying that you never pick your head up to think about alternative solutions? That pretty much describes me, in my basement, swapping out trainer tire for outdoor tire for trainer tire for outdoor tire, getting chain grease all over the carpet, and just assuming that this is how it’s done. And then I learned about the Sprint Work Stand by Feedback Sports.
TAAAHHH-DAAAHHH!!! Light bulb does not even begin to describe it.

WHAT IS IT?
The Sprint Work Stand by Feedback Sports  is a bike work and wash stand. Unlike the work stands that you often see at your local bike shop that use a seat post or top tube clamp to hold your bike, the Sprint Work Stand uses a fork mount to secure and stabilize your baby. I mean bike.

WHY SHOULD YOU CARE?
For starters, I am now convinced that anyone who does any work on their own bike – tire changes included – should own a work stand. If my grease-on-the-carpet story didn’t resonate with you, how about the fact that my race wheels stayed on my bike for 8 weeks because there wasn’t a day warm enough to pop my bike on my car’s bike rack and swap out wheels. Does that sound familiar? Now just imagine changing wheels and mounting rear bottle cages, all in the comfort and warmth of your house – without getting grease everywhere. SOLD, right?

Glad that we’re on the same page. So, then, the reason that you want the Sprint Stand specifically is because, since it uses a fork mount, you don’t have to stress about the top tube shape of this bike and the seat post shape of that bike and is there any one stand that will work with all of my bikes? Yes! The Sprint Work Stand. DOUBLE SOLD!

HOW DOES IT WORK?
The Sprint Stand is a cinch to use. Even though I only glanced at the directions the first time I whipped it out to change my daughter’s tire, I had it set up in just a minute or two. The stand uses four clamps similar to the clamps on your bike’s seat post to manage the entire setup and breakdown process, which makes everything quick and easy.

You open one clamp to expand the tripod base, a few others to adjust the height of the stand, and then there’s a nifty clamp to lock the horizontal mounting bar in place. Just like that, the stand is set up. To mount your bike, you simply remove the front wheel and throw it on the fork mount using one of the three provided skewers and their accompanying spacers. The fork mount has a slide adjustment, so once your bike is mounted you can easily slip the fork mount forward or backward so that your bottom bracket rests on the rubber base.

Once you’ve got your bike mounted, you can rotate it 360 degrees to provide easy access to whichever part of your bike you’re working on. In just a few weeks, I’ve used it to change tires, swap out wheels, wash my bike and un-attach my rear bottle system. Previously I would’ve attempted this with my bike either on the car’s bike rack or leaning against the wall in my basement, neither of which provides the same access or stability as the Sprint Work Stand. My bike was super sturdy once cinched into the fork mount and, with the rotation and adjustable height, I could easily get to anything I wanted to work on. The only two drawbacks were that my hands still got greasy dealing with my chain (granted, that’s totally a user error thing) and that you can’t adjust the front brakes on the stand since the front wheel isn’t on your bike. It’s easy enough to adjust those brakes once you pop the wheel back on, though, so it’s really not a big deal.

Once you’re done working on your bike, the stand folds down more easily and quickly than it sets up, and collapses into a compact unit that you can easily tuck away in your garage or the corner of your pain cave. It’s only been a couple of weeks, I’ve already used it several times, and I really don’t know how or why I managed to go this long without scooping one up.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?
The Sprint Work Stand is available direct through Feedback Sports for $269.99 plus tax and shipping.

Karen Hornbostel Memorial Time Trial

The following post is sponsored content provided by the cobrascycling.org

It’s that time of year for some of our favorite races and setting up the race season for both cyclists and triathletes might begin with some time trial practice. What a great way to transition from indoor training rides, getting that bike fit over the off season and testing it on a time trial.

In Denver, The Karen Hornbostel Memorial Time Trial series is an attractive way to start the season.  The KHMTT is hosted by the long-standing COBRAS Cycling team and is a favorite for those wanting to get out in the middle of the week and spin their legs.

For those not familiar with the KHMTT, it is a seven-week time trial series held at Cherry Creek State Park on Wednesday nights starting on April 5th with start times from 4:30 to about 6:30 PM. The course is a somewhat challenging 9.5 miles with a heart pumping climb to the finish. This is one race where you don’t want to leave anything on the course!

It’s a great opportunity to have a great time as well as hone your time trial racing skills and improve your time week after week. The COBRAS post results quickly and keep a running tally of the series ranking on their web site.

They also hire local photographer Ryan Muncy every year to take action shots of the racers and post them to their web site and make them available to racers at no cost. That is a really sweet perk!

This year they are encouraging cyclists who have never raced before and would like to try it out by offering a one night race, USAC license for the night and all for only $20!  That is a really inexpensive and easy way to try out the sport and see if you like it or not.

For more information about the KHMTT and to register, you will find everything on their web site at http://KHMTT.com.

CU student cyclist victim of hit and run; Triathlon community rallies support, driver still at large

source: channel 7 news

 

University of Colorado student and member of the CU Triathlon team, Phoebe Iguchi was hit by a green pick-up truck on Saturday during a training ride on Monarch road near Tom Watson park northeast of Boulder. The motorist fled the scene and has not been found. Fortunately it appears she will make a full recovery and luckily Matt Miller was right behind her and first on the scene.

 

Matt Miller, BASE Performance

Matt Miller, owner of BASE Performance a popular nutrition and supplement brand based in Boulder commented, “Phoebe was face down and crying, devastated as to what was occurring. Her bike was in pieces. One of her cycling shoes was literally 10-15 feet up the road. The impact had knocked the shoe right off of her foot. And yet this guy in the truck fled the scene. It was deplorable. We stayed with Phoebe until the police and ambulance arrived. At that point there was not much else we could do as it was under control.”

Realizing she was going to be ok, Matt said, “Without insurance, thanks to the driver fleeing the scene, and with the triathlon season around the corner, I wanted to help her get back as fast as possible. I quickly got on the phone with companies I work with and they didn’t hesitate to help. Our community is so helpful and fabulous, that’s what I love most about the triathlon community, the people.”

 

Matt’s efforts resulted in several companies in the triathlon industry helping her replace her bike and helmet. QUINTANA ROO, COBB SADDLES and Denver’s RUDY PROJECT have all committed to getting her back on the road as quickly as she can. CEO of Rudy Project North America, Paul Craig said, “All of us at Rudy Project send our best wishes and prayers to Phoebe for her speedy recovery.   To help Phoebe get back on her bike and gear up for the road ahead we will donate 20% off all sales on E-Rudy.com in the month of April using the code PHOEBE at checkout and get a 30% discount.

Phoebe knows it could’ve been a lot worse and said to 303Triathlon, “I just want to thank the triathlon community for all the support they have shown. I also want to take this opportunity to say that I was doing all the right things as a cyclist, yet it doesn’t guarantee safety. Take precautions and invest in a good helmet, mine probably saved my life. As for vehicles, they need to take equal responsibility when sharing the road.”

 

Longmont Times Call article commenting on IBM security footage of the accident held by Colorado State Patrol here

 

Video from 7news:

 

Additional story from 7news here

Bosley, clubs, pass along Bolder Boulder training tips

Cliff Bosley, 13, center, sprints to the finish on the Boulder High School football field during the 1980 Bolder Boulder 10K. Today, Bosley is the Bolder Boulder race director.

From the Daily Camera

When Cliff Bosley was a kid growing up in Boulder, he learned how to train from a master, Olympic marathon champ Frank Shorter.

A couple of times a month as a sixth, seventh and eighth grader, Bosley’s father, Steve, would drop Cliff off at the Chautauqua- area home of Shorter, named by Track & Field News at the time as the “Marathoner of the Decade.”

Cliff Bosley would run 5 or 6 miles of Shorter’s longer run, keeping up for as long as he could. Call it Training 101, as Bosley was absorbing training lessons from a U.S. track record holder as well as one of the top road racers in the world.

“That is where I was first introduced to the concept of hard and easy days, interval training, hill training,” Bosley, 50, said in a phone interview last week. “Those runs were hard for me and easy for Frank. He was teaching me how to listen to the cues in my own running, relating to how hard to push, when to rest, when do easy runs, when to do hard runs, those kinds of things.”

With all that knowledge, Bosley said, half jokingly, “I should have been way better.”

Bosley trained well enough to run sub-40 minutes at altitude, with a Bolder Boulder best of42:27. As a 12-year old in the first Bolder Boulder, he clocked 47:02, good enough for 10th in his age group.

Read the full story here

Mike Sandrock: Zeiger, Lindley, Wellington. 3 women, 3 champions, 3 books

From the Daily Camera

Joanna Zeiger, seen here racing in the 2010 Boulder Peak Triathlon, will speak about her just-published “The Champion Mindset” March 10 at Flatirons Running. “Surfacing,” by Siri Lindley, also a former world champion triathlete, also has just been published. (Cliff Grassmick / Staff Photographer)

Just about a year ago this time, I was standing near the Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles with a large crowd of running fans watching the exciting finish of the women’s U.S. Olympic marathon trials.

Early leader Shalane Flanagan was faltering in the heat, and Boulder’s Kara Goucher looked to have chance at a top-three finish. (She ended up an oh-so-close fourth).

We were not the only ones watching.

Joanna Zeiger, Boulder’s seven-time Olympic trials participant over three sports, was just about to begin her final six-mile lap when she heard the loud cheers for the fast-approaching leaders.

“I decided to wait and cheer on (winner) Amy Cragg ,” Zeiger, 46, said in a recent phone interview. “I hung out to see who was in the lead. Amy was amazing and seeing her gave just such a chill up my spine and motivation to get through the last lap.”

There was really no need for Zeiger to finish. She could have easily joined the roughly 50 women who pulled out of the marathon that day, done in by the near-90 degree heat. Zeiger’s spot in triathloning history is secure. There was, however, no way she was not going to finish the marathon.

“I knew it was going to be a major struggle,” said Zeiger, who has suffered daily debilitating rib and nerve pain ever since a bike crash in the 2009 70.3 World Triathlon Championships. “I was prepared for a long, tough day; every time I saw a runner walking back to the finish after dropping out, it strengthened my resolve, and I thought, ‘I am going to get through this.'”

Get through it Zeiger did, fueled by her “champion mindset,” which, appropriately, is the name of her new book.

On March 10, Zeiger will talk about “The Champion Mindset: An Athlete’s Guide to Mental Toughness” at Flatirons Running in south Boulder. She will also show footage of her Ironman World Championship win.

In a nice coincidence, “The Champion Mindset” is one of three new books by world champion female triathletes with local ties.

Long-time resident and former world-ranked No. 1 and 2001 world champion Siri Lindley, now a coach of elites based out of RallySport, tells her riveting story in “Surfacing: From the Depths of Self-Doubt to Winning Big & Living Fearlessly,” while four-time Hawaii Ironman world champ Chrissie Wellington, a native of England who lived in Boulder during her top competitive years, is out with “To the Finish Line: A World Champion Triathlete’s Guide to Your Perfect Race.”

Read the full article

Cuba Triathlon Preview

Ten local athletes will travel to Havana, Cuba this week to take part in the Habana Triathlon; 6 of them from Team IPA Endurance. “We are excited to see our athletes participate and experience Cuba and supporting the Cuban athletic scene” said IPA Endurance Co-Founder Bill Garrels. “Team members will participate in either a Sprint or 70.3 race. This is going to be as much a cultural experience as it is a ‘race’ in Cuba. IPA Endurance athletes will be great representatives for the US and the state of Colorado spreading the vibe of helping each other have a great race experience in Cuba.”

The team is also taking donations of wetsuits, goggles, water bottles, etc. to donate to local Cuban triathletes. “This act of International Sports Diplomacy is wonderful … and important.” says Barry Siff, President USAT.

This week brought an unexpected surprise in the form of a bike box embargo from Southwest. Luckily, Chuck Ankeny from local bike shop, Freedom Bikes, stepped in with a loan of Brompton folding bikes. In typical IPA fashion, the athletes are embracing this unexpected challenge. “This race is more about meeting new people and experiencing a different culture, than chasing PRs,” says Donna Shaw.