Colorado Athletes in Kona: Tom Bogan

With Kona IRONMAN World Championships just a few weeks away, 303Triathlon will begin highlighting the athletes who will be representing Colorado at this amazing race and event.

This year there are 54 Colorado athletes headed to the Big Island.  In addition to these folks, we are hoping to include the athletes that were awarded slots through IRONMAN’s Colorado to Kona program.


Today’s athlete is Tog Bogan, enjoy!

I am tremendously honored to be selected to participate in the 2017 Kona Ironman World Championship race. It is an incredible opportunity to be one of the athletes representing the Boulder Triathlon scene! If there is one thing I have learned- it is that consistent dedication has allowed me to attain far more than any innate athletic ability. A fierce determination and burning desire to pour out your best effort will open doors, bring new levels of achievement, and incredible results!

It has been my honor to cross paths with several very high end triathletes living and working in Boulder. They have all been very inspirational and encouraging to consider “being one” of them. I actually started my pursuit of triathlon at the coaxing of my first trainer Stephan Swanson at 24 Hour Fitness. In early 2012 I went in to work with a trainer and change the direction of my life. This time I was stepping over the line and NEVER going back! A few months in, and seeing that I was in it to stay, Stephan brought up the idea of entering and completing a triathlon as part of my training. There was just one little problem—I had always been unable to swim, and quite fearful of the idea!! It never thought that I could ever swim out into a lake and survive the attempt! After a few months of prodding, I agreed to TRY to learn to swim. This journey pursuing the most difficult thing I have ever attempted had begun.

Over the winter with the tremendous help of Meghan Williams and the Longmont Masters swim program, I very slowly began to learn how to not drown. Many days of attempting to swim followed. Nothing came easily. Breathing was difficult and I sank like a kettle bell. Over the winter I slowly saw things improve but still had lingering doubts. This was just a pool-just stand up and you’re OK. A lake, …well………..

The following spring I completed my first triathlon- a watershed moment if there ever was- at the Summer Open Sprint triathlon at my home track at Union Reservoir in Longmont. May 18, 2013 I had done something I NEVER thought was possible and conquered one of the biggest fears in my life! I was a TRIATHLETE! ME! Everything that has happened since then has built on this. My continuing participation in triathlon events are a celebration of what I am now capable of doing. I look back over the swim course at each event now and think—-look what you have just accomplished! You swam way out there and came back alive!

I am now in my 5th year of triathlon competition. Becoming an Ironman was so far from ever being a reality, but it happened to me on August 2, 2015 at the Boulder Ironman based at the Boulder High School that I graduated from in 1978. Ironically-same year Ironman competition started! Little did I know! Racing the Ironman distance is now my favorite though I enjoy all of them. I have completed 3 Boulder Ironman 140.6 events now. I tend to avoid Olympic distances since it is so swim distance weighted. Being a slow swimmer, I tend to get faster as the race goes on, so having time to bike and run down those fast swimmers is really exhilarating! It has been my great honor to have placed very well in a number of Sprint, Olympic, Ironman 70.3 and Ironman140.6. 3 Ironman 140.6 events completed over the last 5 years……………..

 

And…..now…….. now I have been invited to THE BIG SHOW in Kona, Hawaii! Dave Christen came into my office last December to announce to me and the whole world that I had a Kona World Championship race invitation. I was not ready for the instant celebrity attention that this has generated! As Dave inquired how I felt about this incredible opportunity to go to THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, in front of several thousand live Facebook followers, several thoughts raced through my head: Michael Kloostermans heartfelt Kona acceptance last August at Roll-down-to keep believing that you can get there! Am I anywhere near ready to do this? This is the WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP!! How the hell am I going to swim in the ocean-and WITHOUT my wetsuit!? Will I be able to survive this swim?? Can I even float in the ocean?? How do I even start to prepare to go to Hawaii? Where is Kona? What about my bike? What do I do now!?? Looks like I have several new challenges to face!! HELL YEAH-I’m going to KONA!!!

The 2017 season now turns to the Kona coast in Hawaii. I will be accompanied by my wonderful wife Lori and children Wesley and Savannah. I am also blessed by having a number of good friends traveling to Kona just to be there too. Along with a myriad of family, friends, competitors, patients and colleagues that will be following on the Ironman live coverage, I’m in good hands and will be drawing on ALL their energy for this one!!!

Auspiciously, I have set a number of new PR’s at local triathlon and running events this year. An incredible focus on what is ahead for Kona has kept my vigorous training with coach Tim Tracy on track. I keenly realize that I must step up BIG for this event and expect to bring my best game when I get there in October! Coffee boat swim, Welcoming Ceremony, Underpants Run, Pro Panel and being one of the championship competitors are all on my agenda for Kona. I look forward to a strong finish. I may not be up near the sharp end of this race-and that is quite alright- it will be my very best effort. Everything. 100%. The honor of going to the Ironman World Championship race is incredible and very surreal at times. An incredibly important day in my life dawns and I intend to immerse myself fully in this experience to come out a changed person. We’re again about to get some tremendous validation that “Anything Is Possible”! Aloha and Cheers!!

Achilles under new Leadership

Have you ever considered serving as a running guide? Achilles is a great local group, with weekly runs at Wash Park…

From Achilles newsletter

Amelia and her guide Linn, at the Hot Chocolate 10k

Achilles Colorado’s founder and president for four years, Michael Oliva, has returned to New York, Our new president is Amelia Dickerson. Amelia is one of the earliest members of the Denver group, joining when Lending Sight and Achilles joined forces in 2013.

Achilles Colorado meets every Monday evening at 6pm at the Washington Park Recreation Center at, 701 S. Franklin St.

Achilles International of Colorado welcomes all people with disabilities to the wonderful world of RUNNING!

Our mission is to enable people with disabilities to participate in mainstream running in order to promote personal achievement, enhance self-esteem and lower barriers to living a fulfilling life.

Longmont Business tells Ironman 70.3 Boulder to “Go To Hell” in very public manner

Raul Bustamante. co-owner of United Wood Products Inc. along the Diagonal Highway, hung this sign on his truck to protest the limited access to his business during the Ironman 70.3 race on Saturday. (Courtesy photo)

From the Daily Camera

The co-owner of a Longmont wood processing yard told the Ironman 70.3 to go to hell this weekend — in big, red letters.

Raul Bustamante is the co-owner of United Wood Products Inc. along the Diagonal Highway between Airport Road and Niwot Road. Bustamante grew frustrated last year when use of the highway for the Ironman 70.3 half-triathlon made access to his business appear nearly impossible.

This year, Bustamante reached out to local law enforcement asking whether a sign could be put out letting passersby know local businesses along the road would still be open during the race. After chatting with the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office and Colorado State Patrol, Bustamante felt reassured that this would be a simple fix.

But when he called to double check with Ironman race organizers that everything was set, his frustrations ballooned.

Read the full story

Becky Piper – Paralyzed on right side, completes Ironman 70.3 Boulder

“Don’t be afraid to fail. Be afraid to not try.”
That’s Becky Piper‘s motto.

Yesterday, Becky was able to check another monstrous goal off her list – the Boulder Ironman 70.3.

A tremendous achievement for any able-bodied soul, Becky had to work harder than most, both physically and mentally, because she is paralyzed on her right side.
Just four years ago she was an accomplished runner and XTERRA athlete, living in Guam with her husband Sam, stationed in the military there. During a home invasion, she was beaten, and according to doctors, was with an hour of dying. But she didn’t die. She survived, and learned to talk and eat and walk again.
She GOT BACK UP.
In June, 303 reported on Becky’s “comeback” off-road triathlon at XTERRA Lory:
Becky Piper: Xterra Nats qualifier, savagely attacked, comatose & paralyzed, and back to Xterra again – at local Lory race

We followed her closely yesterday as she tackled the next goal on her list, IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder.
303’s Para-Tri ambassador Sasha Underwood is a close friend of Becky’s, and frequent training partner and guide. She was at every turn of Saturday’s race, and was overwhelmed with pride and emotion as Becky hit each milestone.

Becky is everything I strive to be; sheer grit, tenacious, positive, gracious, kind, courageous, strong, an amazing sense of humor, and she’ll probably kill me for saying this but she is inspiring – but not because she has a disability .. it’s because she finds a way to do anything and everything whether it’s racing, or becoming a USAT coach, she doesn’t accept “no” or “can’t” and nothing can stop her.

Sasha captured these pivotal moments of Becky being carried out of the water by her husband, and the crowning moment of crossing the finish line, just behind the similarly-inspiring story of Team Agar.
Swim exit video:

Finish video

Read today’s Times-Call article for more on Becky Piper, including the special Allard Brace she uses, her husband’s tough love, and this observation:


Becky Piper said she hopes news of her first Ironman 70.3 reaches someone who is living with a mobility issue.

“I just want to get the word out that if you have foot drop, then your life and your quality of life isn’t over,” she said. “There’s tools out there and there is technology out there to improve your quality of life. And not to give up. Don’t give up.”

 

 

Father-Son Agar Team tackles Ironman 70.3 Boulder

Jeff & Johnny Agar with Ironman Regional Director Dave Christen

By Kim Welk

Jeff and Johnny Agar of Rockford, Michigan will be among the faces in the Ironman Boulder 70.3 event on Saturday.  Jeff and Johnny are a father-son team.  Johnny is 23 and was born with cerebral palsy.  Johnny is an athlete. On his website, Johnny defines athlete as – “a person who is proficient in sports and other physical exercise.”  He goes on to state that “Now that I have crossed the finish line, I feel like I am officially an athlete.”  Jeff and Johnny have completed 5Ks to Marathons and sprint to 70.3 triathlons.

I had the opportunity to sit down with Jeff and Johnny as well as his Mom Becki, Sisters Annie and Grace and Coaches Thad Beaty and Nicole Serraiocco to talk about the race.

This is the family’s first visit to Colorado.  After driving 17 hours from Michigan they were happy to settle into their home away from home for the week.  Johnny enjoyed the opportunity to visit a park with his Aunt and Uncle and fish in the stream where he caught several brown trout.  He also hopes to get to the Olympic Training Center while he is here.  The family also plans to go to a Colorado Rockies baseball game.  They all expressed how much they like Colorado and how excited they are to be here.

Jeff and Johnny have been getting their training in since arriving.  Yesterday was a preview of the swim at the reservoir and a brief look at the bike course.  They have also driven the bike course and looked at targets using Best Bike Split software to determine their strategy for race day.  The goal for both Jeff and Johnny is to manage the matches that they will use on the course and ensure that there are enough matches left for Johnny to walk the last ½ mile of the run course and cross the finish under his own power.  For Jeff – this means controlling power output on the bike, hydrating properly to limit the impacts of the altitude and applying his training with confidence.  For Johnny – he too needs to ensure that he is properly hydrated, he has to shift around in the chariot to keep his feet awake so they are ready to walk and he says his most important job is to remind his Dad about his cadence!  He looks forward to the ice cream post race!

As most triathletes know, mindset is equally as important as the skills needed to swim, bike and run.  Johnny’s mindset is an inspiration.  He believes that failure is part of the process.  He has received encouragement from his family, his coaches and his friends every step of the way.  His sister Annie said “if he failed it was not because of the fact that he had cerebral palsy it was because he did not try hard enough.”  And Johnny agrees – he takes ownership and does not make excuses.  Johnny is not worried about not doing it, he is worried about “not trying.”

Race morning will involve many checklists.  Johnny said that he doesn’t sleep because he is so excited for the event so when it is time to get rolling he is waking the family up.  His Sisters commented that their job is to get themselves to the car so that he stops herding them to go!  Jeff said the set-up takes much longer for them with all of the equipment and referring to the checklists often is a must.  He said there is only one time that you show up at a race without a life jacket!

Jeff and Johnny will have their coaches on sight to support them throughout the day.  They embrace the opportunity to learn and grow from observing this team at work and to gather information to carry forward to the next goal.  The Agars are hoping for an invitation to return to Kona and Johnny will continue to train towards his ultimate goal of completing a 5K on his own and “give his Dad a break!”

Here is a great video taken Wednesday by coach Nicole Serraiocco:

To learn more about Team Agar, visit their webpage – www.TeamAgar.com.

As the writer of this article, receiving the opportunity to cover Team Agar at this race is a gift that is amazing.   There were so many valuable life lessons learned in our brief conversation.  I look forward to a continued friendship with the family and following Johnny and Jeff’s journey and celebrating each milestone along the way.

Look for additional information throughout the weekend on Team Agar’s journey as well as their race recap.  Until then as Johnny says – “one step at a time!

Women’s Wednesday: Pros v. Amos, Tri-Style – featuring Gwen Jorgensen, Alicia Kaye, aaaaaaaand Katie Macarelli!

Photo: Pro Velo Passion

By Dana Willett

A little back-history of Pro’s vs Amo’s:

These events go back to the summer of 2014 when we had the 1st “Pro’s vs “Amos” contest (“amos” is just a rhyming abbreviation for “amateurs”). There was a chocolate chip cookie bake-off followed by a dodge ball tournament. There was laughter and tears. *It was mostly the laughing and the cookies that inspired us to keep this “challenge” going.

Since then we’ve invited many strong, fun women to join in on the shenanigans. While the cast of women is ever changing (life happens), the spirit of this event never will. This will always be a somewhat silly celebration of the pure joy we all have for our sport.

————————————————-

Pros & Amos: Tri-Style

In a digital-cyber-y version of 303’s famous Pros v. Amos challenges, we pit famous local “Amo” Katie Macarelli opposite a couple “Pro” athletes you may have heard of… Olympic World Champion Gwen Jorgensen & Professional Triathlete Alicia Kaye! And we’re talking about how Pros live their athletic lives and learn their lessons, compared to Amos… What it’s like as a female role model, mistakes they’ve made, and how they’ve overcome obstacles along the path to stardom… Read on to find out who’s a brainiac with multiple degrees… who hurdles barbed wire fences with ease… and who’s favorite prize ever was 20 pounds of steak.

Here’s some background:

GWEN JORGENSEN
Gwen Jorgensen is a professional triathlete from St Paul, MN. Gwen is a 2x Olympian, 2x World Champion (2014, 2015), and 17x ITU World Triathlon Series race winner. She also likes to read, try new foods, and hang out with friends and family.

Career Highlights:

    • 2016 Olympic Champion
      2015 World Champion
      2014 World Champion
      2012 U.S. Olympic Team Member
      2013 USA Triathlon’s Triathlete of the Year
      2014 USA Triathlon’s Triathlete of the Year
      2015 USA Elite National Champion
      2014 USA Elite National Champion
      2013 USAT Elite National Champion (Sprint and Olympic Distance)
      First USA Woman to win a World Triathlon Series race
      15-time ITU World Triathlon Series Winner
      2010 USAT Rookie of the Year
      2010 USAT Elite Duathlete of the Year

ALICIA KAYE
Alicia grew up in Canada and began participating in triathlon when she was 11 years old; she became a professional triathlete at the age of 14. Alicia spent her teen years racing triathlon while juggling her academic studies. While completing her undergraduate degree in Sport Psychology she met fellow triathlete and now husband, Jarrod Shoemaker. Since meeting Jarrod she has began racing for the United States and also completed her masters degree in Athletic Counseling. Some of Alicia’s proudest moments include winning Canadian Junior National Championships in 2001, and winning the St. Anthony’s Triathlon in 2013. In her spare time Alicia works as a mental trainer and runs a skincare company with her husband Jarrod, called Endurance Shield.

 

And our “Amo,” KATIE MACARELLI
Katie is a Colorado native who grew up on a dairy farm on the Eastern Plains. She got her start in the Colorado cycling scene competing in triathlons for about five years until she realized that running is the worst. She’s a mom of two teenage girls, a year-round bike commuter who hates driving but loves cyclocross. She is currently the marketing manager for Feedback Sports.

 

 

Here we go!
1. Have you ever googled yourself? Any oft-repeated MISconceptions out there that you’d like to clear up? Any rumor or tall tale that just keeps popping up on Wikipedia? Here’s your chance to set the record straight. And if not, give us your best pretend fake fact.

GJ:  I’ve googled my husband, Patrick Lemieux, but don’t google myself. I think one thing people may assume is that I come from a running background, however I actually come from a swimming background and didn’t start running until I was a junior in college.

AK: Yes, I’ve googled myself. It almost always just to find an image or to find articles written about a recent race. Maybe once every few years I’ll look to see if anyone is saying something mean or false, but I’ve never found anything truly negative.

KM: ​I work in the digital marketing realm, so of COURSE I have. The only misconception I’ve ever found was an article that listed me as living in Portland. I’ve never actually been to Portland, but it sounds lovely. *I generally disregard everything past page 5 on google, because it’s like reading the comments on Pinkbike. It will just make you mad and/or confused.

2. How has your rise to fame affected your performances? Has there ever been a time when the spotlight really helped you? Or worked against you?

GJ: I am an introvert, so it took some time to get used to the media attention and fans walking up to me. I now enjoy being able to share my experiences, but still need my alone time to recharge.
In 2012, after I qualified for the Olympics I had a bunch of media engagements lined up for the week of a WTS race in San Diego. I did an all day photo shoot along with other media the week leading into the race and I believe this contributed to my poor performance. I think I almost finished dead last.

Photo: Finisher Pix

AK: I had my breakout year in 2013 winning the Lifetime Series and Toyota Triple Crown. I thought it would be this ultra grand moment where everything would change. But life went on as normal, the money and/ or result didn’t change any of my relationships- we were just able to make a big fat mortgage payment instead;) What was interesting was in 2014 I really struggled to find purpose and meaning after achieving all my goals in 2013, trying to replicate them again in 2014 was an entirely different experience.

KM: I’m not famous, but I do find it hard to get to the start line to any race because I often stop to hug, heckle and/or say hello to friends. As it turns out, missing the start of a race directly impacts your performance.

 

3. Please provide five single-word adjectives that best describe you and what makes you tick.

GJ: Stubborn. Disciplined. Focused. Driven. Foodie.

AK: Even-tempered. Leader. Brave. Disciplined. Joyful.

KM: Enthusiastic. Loud. Empathetic. Droll. Indefatigable. (You said single-word, so I didn’t think I could use “over-caffeinated”)

4. Have you experienced being asked media questions different from your male counterparts that you attribute to gender? What’s your best example?

GJ: Can’t think of one off the top of my head, but I also try not to read into questions too much. I also have a poor memory so may have been asked something but have forgotten. I do believe there should be equal prize money for men and women (which there is in ITU which I love).

AK: This is a great question, I think our sport is pretty good about equality but the biggest gender difference I notice is that it’s ALWAYS the male winners picture in a newspaper article. Media outlets within our sport tend to include pictures of the women’s winner and why is the men’s race always written about first?

KM: No, because the media isn’t interested in me. However, I’ve been in many eye-rolling situations as a female working in a male dominated industry. I feel our industry (and society in general)​ is getting better about this but I still got called “Hon” only a few months ago by a guy my age who was visiting our office. I can assure you that I’m not his “Hon.”

5. What is the best PRIZE you’ve ever won, in your entire life of racing (maybe it was that 2nd grade field day ribbon…)?

GJ: Any prize that involves food! In 2015 I won a gravel road race and won 20lbs of steak.

AK: I won a race down in Tobago a LONG time ago, back in 2005 I think. The trophy was a beautiful wooden carved sea turtle, it’s still hanging on my wall at home.

KM: I won a pair of Tough Girl socks and a pint glass for 3rd place in my first ever Cx race (I raced it on my full suspension Yeti 575). I was instantly in love with cyclocross and bought a Cx bike about 4 months later

6. Race Day prep – name three best practices you always adhere to the night before a race… and three things you always avoid. What is your best example of a time you didn’t follow your own rules, and things fell apart?

GJ: Don’t try anything new (once I ate out in Japan and tried a dish I’d never had before and got food poisoning)
-Relax/put my feet up
-Do openers
-Avoid: unnecessary stress, being on your feet all day, and new foods.

AK: I don’t go to bed until I feel sleepy, I eat the same thing (chicken and rice) and I prepare everything the night before leaving race morning to be fairly stress free. Three things I always avoid the night before a race are any foods that contain caffeine, any foods high in fiber, anything my body isn’t used to.

KM: Hahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. Race prep. That’s funny. Here are my “3 best practices”:

-Start looking for my wetsuit​ at about 10 pm​. and run a load of laundry.
-Eat a bowl of Peanut Butter Panda Puffs and pack my bag in the dark so I don’t wake my family.
-Get a good, solid 4 hours of sleep.

Three things I avoid ​(d​ue to life in general plus an incessant desire to self-sabotage):
-Dialed logistics. ​
-Consistent, focused athletic ​training.
-Having enough ______________ to make success an option (fill in the blank with any of the following: sleep, water, food, peace of mind, clean clothes, gas in the car etc)

Best example of things falling apart:
An example where things went wrong: Pretty much every race I’ve done since I turned 35. ​Recently, I had to hop a barbed-wire fence and run through a ditch to find the start-line. Good thing I grew up on a farm.

7. If you’re a Pro, do you ever find yourself wishing you were an Amateur? And if you’re an Amateur, every wish you were a Pro? Why?

GJ: I love what I do and am thrilled to be able to also make it my living. I do hate training when the body is tired and it is pouring rain outside.

AK: I went pro at such an early age that I almost can’t remember what it’s like to race as an amateur. Triathlon has been my life since I was 14 years old, and I began participating in them at 11. I think what I’ll miss when I don’t race as a pro someday is a clear course!

KM: Nope. Waaaaay too much pressure. I race because it helps me conquer my fears, which is a good example for my daughters and other women. Oh, and also: its good preparation should things go south and we find ourselves in a post-Apocalyptic scenario.  If I had to do that as a job, I’d undoubtedly get fired.

Want to know more about Alicia, Gwen and Katie?

Follow their careers:

Alicia Kaye

Gwen Jorgensen

Katie Macarelli – Feedback Sports

Mark on Monday: Making Triathlon Easier

Photo: Vox Efx on Flickr

By Mark Cathcart

With the race season well underway, and hopefully a few more races ahead this year, you’ll have gained a lot more experience. No doubt you’ll have had a chance to put to the test some of the tips you’ve heard from other triathletes, and read here on 303 Triathlon.

In this month’s Pragmatic triathlete, I’ll pass on five less well traveled tips aimed at making the remaining races of this season, and your training a little easier.

MAKE IT EASIER… on your head
No more chaffing! After a couple of months of sweating your helmet straps will start to get stiff. The best and easiest way to clean your straps is simply to get a bowl or dish that is narrower than the width of your helmet. Fill the bowl with hot (not boiling) water and add a tablespoon of vinegar. Sit your helmet on the bowl, allowing the straps to hang in the water. Leave it there overnight; capillary action will draw the water up the straps. Next morning throw the water away, rinse the straps under the cold tap, dry the straps with a towel and leave to dry. Then give a light coating with olive oil or similar, making sure you include the plastic retainers etc. which will aid in stopping them from cracking.

MAKE IT EASIER… on your feet
Clean shoes, clean mind! Many people regularly throw their running shoes in the washing machine with a load of towels to get them clean(1). You probably shouldn’t do the same with cycling shoes; even though these days few cycling shoes are leather, they have lots of other components and screws for cleats that you wouldn’t want to submerge in water and soak with soap.

You can overhaul them in a more traditional way with shoe cleaners and polish, but this can be tricky. One of the simpler ways to protect and clean cycling shoes is to get them a wipe down with a wet cloth, then a light spray with WD40. Once you’ve sprayed them, give them a wipe down with a soft dry cloth (old non-tech race t-shirt?)

This will both revive fading and grubby leather/pleather; it will also polish up and help protect any synthetic pieces and give the shoes a coating that will help protect them.

MAKE IT EASY… on your back
Core strength! Now your cycling and running are up to speed, doesn’t your lower back feel stiff from time to time? Try some specific stretches for your hamstrings, shoulders and lower back. The lower and upper halves of your body and anchored in your lower back and the more flexible and strong it is, the more fluid you will be.

Learn to love a foam roller, Boulder Bodyworker has some videos to help you get started.

MAKE IT EASIER… on the bike
Less rattle, more roll! You don’t need any special mechanic skills to keep your bike chain clean and lubricated. Even if you only use your race bike in the summer, when it’s dry, your chain will still pickup dirt and dust from the road which will make you less efficient. You should probably give your chain a quick clean weekly, and definitely after any ride where there was a lot of dry dust.

Serious cyclists will recommend buying expensive chain specific tools and brushes, and even removing the chain. You can do a basic job with it still on the bike. Use an old toothbrush or other stiff brush; use an old rag doused with some white spirit to remove old oil and dirt. I use bleach wipes for simplicity and speed; change the rag, drip oil around the chain and then gently remove any excess oil. The real trick is NOT to oil a dirty chain, it will make things worse, any dirt will just stick to the oil.

Don’t use WD40! Specialist oils are best, but if you don’t have any, you can use almost anything, baby oil, cooking oil, olive oil, just don’t over apply, wipe off the excess, and make sure you clean it thoroughly next time.

MAKE IT EASIER… in transition
Less stuff, more speed! Over recent years there has been a huge increase in the amount of “stuff” people take into transition. Athletes regularly tote huge plastic boxes into transition full of stuff, most of which they won’t need. To me this just says, “Novice: lacks confidence in race plan.” Take only the minimal stuff you actually need and will use during the race(2). Arrive early, set-up transition, and take everything else back to the car. With less mess, you’ll be faster in transition, no matter how orderly your stuff is, it will become a mess, it takes up valuable space and will slow down decisions.

Enjoy your upcoming races, next time I’ll take a look at some challenges to change things up.

1) Both cycling and running shoes will benefit from having their insoles removed and washed, especially running shoes, which will potentially have grit and talc after races. Pay attention to wear and tear of insoles, you can replace them, but they are also a good indication of the overall condition of the shoes themselves.
2) When you are out on the bike, the only things left in transition are swim googles, wetsuit and cap; and the equipment you’ll use on the run.

Mark Cathcart took up triathlon in the late 90’s to get fit for adventure racing, which to this day he has never done, and has since taken part in 170+ events. His pragmatic approach to training, racing, and life have lead in from being the Chairman of one of the bigger UK Triathlon clubs 15-years ago; British Triathlon volunteer of the year; a sometime race organizer; The organizer and ride leader for Austin Texas award winning Jack and Adams triathlon shop; doing sometime Sports Management for development and professional triathletes; he has attended all the Triathlon Business International, and Triathlon America conferences, where he usually asks the questions others won’t; moved to Colorado in 2016 and is a co-owner of Boulder Bodyworker

Becky Piper: Xterra Nats qualifier, savagely attacked, comatose & paralyzed, and back to Xterra again – at local Lory race

By Sasha Underwood

Several years ago Becky Piper was attacked while living in Guam by would be armed robbers, severely beaten with a gun and left to die. Local naval doctors immediately evacuated her to San Diego for treatment. She is now partially paralyzed. Yesterday she completed Xterra Lory. What happened in between is remarkable and brought tears to my eyes watching her finish knowing all that she went through to even compete.  You can read about her account HERE.

Prior to the attack, Becky was an ultra-marathon runner. A friend of hers had mentioned the Xterra in Guam and essentially challenged her by saying because he was a guy he would be faster than her and would beat her time – which ignited a small fire in her. She trained and completed the 2013 Xterra Guam, finishing 2nd in her age group and qualified for the Xterra National Championships.  Oh, and her friend, did not even start because he didn’t train.

Shortly after that she was attacked.  When she finally emerged from her coma weeks later and barely started talking, she asked the doctors if she could resume racing. They explained that her paralysis may be permanent – to which she replied, “Ok, well that’s why there’s a Para Athlete division!” After spending some time with her I can only imagine her saying that in a matter-of-fact, upbeat, genuine way with that huge Becky smile of hers!

She is now paralyzed on her right side and uses a brace to walk. Within the past three years, she has become a USAT Coach with Team MPI, and she completed two sprint triathlons last year. Check out her accomplishments on her Facebook page!

When we met last year, I asked if she would be doing Xterra’s again. She explained that she would like to but wasn’t sure of which one would be suitable for her. I immediately thought of Xterra Lory – it’s such a great course for beginners and experts alike. A flowy bike course with a great climb of a run.

She signed up for Xterra Lory at the beginning of this year. I mentioned how I love that race but I can’t run anymore since my hip surgery in November, to which she replied, “then walk! I’m doing it!” Of course I signed up after that. Originally I was going to race the swim and bike portion and have my mom do the run.

Becky was nervous about the bike portion. She pre-rode the course a couple times and a few days before the race I asked her if she would feel more confident if I rode behind her on the bike course. She loved that idea so I planned to stay with her the entire race.

The Swim:

We put on our wetsuits to go do a quick practice swim. It was the first open water swim of the year for both of us – nothing like waiting until race day! Anna, Becky’s transition handler, and Sam, Becky’s husband, helped Becky into her wetsuit. The best part was watching them lift Becky up by either side and try to shake her into her wetsuit! I REALLY wish I had taken a picture of that!

The entrance to the lake was slick and muddy and several athletes slipped while entering. It was a good time to discuss a strategy for Anna to help Becky out of the water when she finished. The water was chilly and both Becky and I had a little cold water shock panic when we put our face in the water.  We were in wave seven so we had plenty of time to practice. By the second wave we were comfortable and I tried to stay slightly to her right and in front of her so she could follow me.

We finished faster than her projected time in under 30minutes!

The Bike:

Sam modified Becky’s bike so all of the shifters and brakes are on the left side. In addition, her bike is a full suspension, more of a down-hill, slack geometry and has a 27.5 wheel on the front with a 26 wheel on the back. Becky can’t stand up to get over obstacles or downhill sections so the wheels and geometry of the bike help put her in a better position to ride that type of terrain.

I had so much fun riding with her! Becky had named many sections of the bike course from pre-riding it. The first section she named ‘Bridges Galore’ (but later renamed it to ‘Why Will Becky’s Foot Not Stay On the Pedal’). Next came ‘Where Becky Endo’d’. Then ‘Holy Crap! Look At All the Uphill!’ And last but not least, ‘The Part I Only Saw Once Because the Other Time I got a Flat Tire.’

This girl would fall over, get back up, and do it again. Over, and over, and over again. I was so impressed with her tenacity and perseverance – all the while with a ginormous smile on her face. At one point she fell over, threw her arm up and with a grin from ear to ear said, “ta-dah!” I’m so glad I was there to help out when I could and put her foot back into her unruly pedal. By the end of the bike we pretty much had that down to a science.

Her family and friends were waiting for her at the bike finish cheering with excitement. Anna and Sam helped her transition, changing her biking brace to her running brace made with carbon fiber which is more comfortable and allows better mobility for hiking.

The Run:

I originally was going to do the run with Becky but I forgot my running shoes. Fortunately my mom, who was already planning to run, ran with her instead.  Becky described her run as an attempt to get over rocks. She fell a few times, ended up with a mysterious scrape down her entire length of her arm, and has a bruised and skinned knee… but she did it. She explained that my mom gasped the first time she fell but by the 5th time she was unphased. That’s just what happens. You fall, and then you just get back up.

Becky’s friends and family ran with her through the last 200 yards leading up to the finisher’s chute. I personally could not hold back the tears of joy, knowing what I know about Becky, knowing how meaningful it is to train and overcome obstacles and push through no matter the odds or what life throws at you… knowing what it feels like to cross the finish line of my first 5k, 10k, Marathon and Ironman… the feeling is the same and I couldn’t help the tears from flowing. Looking around there was not a dry eye among us.

Becky is incredibly motivating, inspiring and her up-beat, nothing-can-get-me-down attitude is infectious. I am honored to have raced with her and call her my friend. I look forward to watching her race the Boulder Half Ironman in August!

 

 

 

 

BRINGtheKIDZ at the Colorado Triathlon

BRINGtheKIDZ offers families the opportunity to be together on race day.  They provide quality child care and fun activities allowing mom and dad to focus on race day with out worrying about the kids.  Michelle’s staff will be at many tri events this summer.  Read parent comments from this past weekend’s Colorado Triathlon.

 

On June 3, 2017, BRINGtheKIDZ spent a beautiful morning at the Boulder Reservoir for the Colorado Triathlon with Without Limits Productions. As an added bonus, we also got to cheer on our Ambassador Jessica Kaiser who competed in the sprint!

We enjoyed making motivational signs, a nature scavenger hunt, jewelry making, bubbles, and lots of other fun activities, including cheering for the hardworking athletes.

Jessica told us afterwards, “”My daughter Amy had a great time at the BringtheKidz camp during the Colorado Tri. She told me she loved making craft projects, and I loved seeing her smiling face at the swim exit. It was a great day for both mom and kid!”

We’re looking forward to lots more multisport events this summer and fall, and hope to have more kids join us to add to the fun! Visit us at www.bringthekidz.com to learn more!

6/24/17                TriBella Sprint Tri

6/25/17                Boulder Sunrise Tri

07/09/17              Boulder Peak Tri

07/23/17              Tri Boulder

07/30/17              Outdoor Divas Tri

08/26/17              Boulder Sunset Tri

09/17/17              5430 Tri

In Memory: Kevin Sanford Edwards

Kevin Sanford Edwards, 59, passed while skiing at Loveland Ski Area on the afternoon of April 28, 2017. Kevin was born June 13, 1957, in Ann Arbor, Michigan to David and Mary K Edwards. He spent his childhood in Michigan, Germany, and Pennsylvania before his family settled in Boulder, Colorado in 1971. Kevin received a B.A. in English from Colorado College in 1978 and a J.D. from the University of Denver in 1981. He was married to Laurie Mizener from 1998 to 2006, and their daughter, Aleah Edwards, was born in 1999. After practicing law for eleven years, Kevin founded Ski Gear Direct, a pioneering mail-order and online ski gear company. In the latter part of his career, he was a lawyer for the state of Colorado, most recently as a Senior Assistant Attorney General. A dedicated triathlete, he competed in over 100 triathlons since 1984, including ten full Ironman races, often winning his age group throughout an elite career. Kevin’s passion for racing and training was infectious, and his ability to encourage others and welcome them to his sport seemingly boundless. As passionate as Kevin was about triathlon, he was more passionate about skiing, having started at the age of four in Bavarian Germany. No matter the weather or conditions, the company or location, the very act of skiing brought him unmitigated joy. Kevin was an adoring father to Aleah and a dear friend to so many; he also touched the lives of countless other people with his joy of life, kind heart, wit, compassion, and sense of humor. He loved his family and friends deeply. He is survived by his father Dr. David Edwards; his two brothers Scott and Chris; his ex-wife Laurie and daughter Aleah; his in-laws Carol, Karen, Tiffany, and Tammi; his nephews Christopher and Nathan and niece Jenna; and his girlfriend Erin. Kevin was preceded in death by his mother Mary K Warwick.
A service in memory of Kevin’s life will be held on Friday, May 5, 2017 at the Calvary Bible Church, 3245 Kalmia Ave, Boulder, Colorado, 80301, starting at 3:00pm. A reception will follow the service. All whose lives were touched by Kevin are welcome.

 

From Laurie –

“we have opened a college saving account for Aleah, and the bank’s suggestion is just to have checks sent to Aleah, and they can be marked “college fund” in the memo section.” 

1420 Moss Rock pl, Boulder CO  80304