2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship Triathlon Awarded to Nice, France

TAMPA/NICE (April 20, 2017) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, announced today that the right to host the 2019 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship triathlon has been awarded to Nice, France. The event will take place on Saturday, September 7 and Sunday, September 8, 2019, and will be the first time IRONMAN holds a world championship event in France. In addition, IRONMAN announced today that a brand new IRONMAN 70.3 event will be held in Nice on September 16, 2018 leading to the world championship event a year later; this qualifying event will then continue in 2020 as part of the IRONMAN 70.3 European Tour.

As the capital of the Alpes-Maritimes on the French Riviera in the southeast coast of France, Nice first hosted an IRONMAN® event in 2005 and since then has been one of the most popular locations on the IRONMAN race circuit. The world championship is the pinnacle event in the IRONMAN 70.3 Series, and with the event’s global rotation that began in 2014, it showcases the best venues IRONMAN has to offer around the world.

“The successful growth of the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship since its global rotation began in 2014 can be attributed in large part to Diana Bertsch, the world championship team she established, the host cities, and the collective determination to create an event that captures the hearts and minds of our athletes,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer for IRONMAN. “With the origins of the popular Nice triathlon which set the stage in the region, this is the next evolution of this extraordinary event and brings Europe back to the forefront, with a history of culture, sport and scenery that is the perfect mix for IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship athletes.”

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship event expects to attract more than 5,000 athletes from over 100 global qualifying events in locations such as Austria, Australia, China, Germany, Spain, South Africa, Sweden and the Americas.

With its mix of old-world opulence, year-round sunshine and stunning seaside location, Nice is the unofficial capital of the Côte d’Azur and the fifth-largest city in France. A magnet for beachgoers and culture-seekers since the 19th century, this coastal city has fabulous markets, an enticing old town, glorious architecture and a wealth of high-end restaurants. With one of the largest international airports in France located just minutes away from the city, Nice is easily accessible and welcomes over five million visitors every year as one of the most famous tourist destinations in the world. Beyond the beauty of the area, Nice also offers a rich culture built by some of the greatest painters, writers and musicians the world has known. With outstanding cuisine and culture, Nice embodies all the benefits of a historic coastal city. If you really want to soak up the Riviera vibe, there’s no better place.

“It is with great pride that our city will host this international competition for the first time in France, with a sport that is particularly well established in Nice. Since 1982, our city has organized world-renowned triathlon events, held in an exceptional setting with a truly unique course,” said Christian Estrosi, President Region Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur. “This will undoubtedly be a momentous occasion for all triathlon enthusiasts and I welcome everyone to enjoy the beauty of our city. Nice is now recognized as a great host city for major events of international recognition. This dedication to staging events is an essential asset for the development of economic activity. Each year, IRONMAN brings € 4 million in economic revenue, and I am convinced that this new event will once again strengthen our attractiveness as a host city and boost our local economy.”

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is part of a week-long festival that will include a range of lifestyle events for the community and visitors to enjoy.

“With IRONMAN France, our French team lead by Yves Cordier has created one of the best IRONMAN events in the world, as voted by athletes in the IRONMAN Athletes’ Choice Awards. It is only fitting that the 2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship has been awarded to Nice and the Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur region,” said Hans-Peter Zurbrügg, Managing Director for IRONMAN Europe, Middle East and Africa. “Both the city and region offer easy access, a stunning backdrop for the event, and exceptional tourism destination for friends and family. We look forward to welcoming athletes from all over the world to this amazing location.”

The event will incorporate a swim in the pristine waters of the Mediterranean Sea, a bike course that passes through villages and mountains, and a run course along Nice’s historic Promenade des Anglais waterfront.

“Ever since competing as a professional athlete in the 1989 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawai’i, it has been my dream to bring a world championship event to the city and region I call home; that dream is now becoming a reality,” said Yves Cordier, Managing Director, IRONMAN France. “I would like to extend my gratitude to the City of Nice and the Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur for their loyalty and trust in our team. We are ready to welcome the world to Nice!”

Prior to the 2019 edition taking place in Nice, the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is taking place on September 9 and 10, 2017 in Chattanooga, Tennessee; and the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship will travel to Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa on September 1 and September 2, 2018.

For more information about the event, please visit http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/events/ironman-70.3/world-championship.

Dash-n-Dine Race Recap: Fun is Key

By Cheri Felix

Now that we’ve completed Dash & Dine #1, here is my race report. Mine might be different than the usual race report (as if anyone else went home to write in their Dash & Dine diary).

Easy. I signed up a long time ago so all I needed to do was pick up my bib. Keep your bib. It’s your bib for the series. That’s slick. Now all I have to do is show up. No waiting in line. Now I have more port-o-potty time.

Warmup. Matt from Revolution Running lead us in a FREE coached warmup. First we ran and then we did drills. It was my first coached warm up and I’ll admit, my first real warm up. Matt was nice and helpful. It was fun. And he’ll be there again next Tuesday.

Fun. I want to be very clear. I am not that person who says “I’m just out here to have fun. I don’t care about my time.” That’s not me. I do care about my time. I want to get faster and stronger. Of course, at some point I won’t get faster, things will level out. But for now, there’s room for improvement. But it does have to be fun. Even after childbirth they handed me a beautiful baby. Suffering is fine as long as it’s served with a side of fun. Friends, kind spectators, food afterwards and a welcoming finish line; all ingredients for a fun evening.

My time. Okay, here it is. My time was 14 seconds slower than my fastest time last year. Which means I am 14 seconds slower than my peak time which was at the END of the Dash & Dine 5k series. The good news is that my last mile was faster than my first two. Can I go out a few seconds faster on the first mile without losing it? Can I go a bit faster on the second mile if there is no headwind this time? Maybe. Or maybe #2 will just be slower. What then? Who knows. Perhaps that’s part of why we line up. It’s an unknown and in this life of immediately knowing whatever we need to know whenever we need to know it (goodbye microfiche, hello Google) we line up not knowing how it will all work out. And like when some of us get married or take our car into the shop, we hope for the best.

Honesty. I’ll be honest. There are some people out there that are fast. Like 18, 19, 20 minute 5k fast. You can’t see me, but I’m clapping for them. For the rest of us, we line up, we run and we finish. Our time is our time. It’s a number on a clock. It’s not a statement about who you are as a person. It’s not a determinate of how long you’ll live or how much you will be loved. It’s not a hint as to how nice you are or how you will be remembered. It’s a number and it’s your number.

I hope you’ll come out for the next Dash & Dine on Tuesday. I’ll be there and I’ll probably be talking loudly at the start and laughing at the finish. If you need a pep talk, come find me.

See you there!

USAT 2017 Collegiate & High School National Championships

Colorado’s Brittany Warly, the 2016 Collegiate Draft-Legal Champion. Mario Cantu/CIMAGES.

COLLEGIATE CLUB AND HIGH SCHOOL TRIATHLETES TO RACE FOR NATIONAL TITLES IN TUSCALOOSA NEXT WEEK

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The nation’s top collegiate club and high school triathletes will compete for national titles starting next Friday at the 2017 USA Triathlon Collegiate Club & High School National Championships in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, from April 21-22.

More than 1,300 collegiate athletes from 120 clubs and more than 130 high school triathletes are set to race.

The action begins Friday at 8:15 a.m. with the fifth-annual Draft-Legal Collegiate Championships, where athletes will compete over a 750-meter swim, five-lap, 20.2-kilometer bike and 5-kilometer run course. The collegiate men will race first, followed by the collegiate women at 10 a.m.

Also on the docket for Friday is the second annual High School National Championships. Athletes will compete in sprint-distance event featuring a 750m swim, three-lap, non-drafting 20.25k bike and 5k run course. The boys’ high school race will begin at 12 p.m., and the girls’ race will follow at 1 p.m. The High School Nationals race was contested for the first time last year in Clemson, South Carolina.

Racing continues on Saturday with the marquee Collegiate Club National Championships Olympic-distance race, which has long been a staple of the Collegiate Club Nationals program. Athletes will cover a 1,500m swim, non-drafting 40k bike, 10k run course, with the men starting at 7:30 a.m. and women starting at 10:20 a.m.

The weekend concludes with the Collegiate Mixed Team Relay on Saturday at 4:15 p.m. Teams are comprised of four athletes (two men and two women), with each athlete covering a 300m swim, 5.9k bike, 1.6k run course. The Mixed Team Relay event will also feature up to 10 alumni teams.

For all races, athletes will swim in Black Warrior River, bike and run on Jack Warner Parkway, the Tuscaloosa Riverwalk and surrounding roads, and finish at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater.

Qualified athletes may compete in both the draft-legal and Olympic-distance Collegiate National Championship events, and both races will count toward the overall team scores. Winners of individual races, as well as all team standings, will be announced at the award ceremony, scheduled for 8 p.m. on April 22 at the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater. The Awards Ceremony will also recognize the fastest swim, bike and run splits from the Olympic-distance collegiate race.

The 2017 Collegiate Club & High School National Championships will be the first event to utilize USA Triathlon’s new National Events App. The app, which features athlete tracking, event schedules, selfie filters and more, is available now for free download on iPhone and Android devices. For more information, visit usatriathlon.org/eventsapp.

Multisport fans can also follow the action on USA Triathlon’s live blog at usatriathlon.org/usatcn17coverage. Event coverage will begin 15 minutes prior to the start of the draft-legal sprint, high school and Olympic-distance events.

The University of Colorado has earned the Collegiate Club Nationals title for the past seven years and returns as the defending champion of the overall team title. Colorado also earned the men’s team title in 2016, while UCLA picked up the women’s team title for the third straight year.

Colorado’s Brittany Warly (women’s) and Penn State’s Mike Meehan (men’s) picked up individual wins last year in the Draft-Legal Collegiate Championships. Erica Clevenger of the University of Arizona earned the women’s Olympic-distance collegiate title, while Meehan took his second national title in as many days in the Olympic-distance event. Led by 2015 Collegiate Nationals champion Kelly Kosmo, UCLA earned the Mixed-Team Relay title.

Taylor Knibb (girls’) and Jake Baugher (boys’) were the inaugural high school national champions in 2016, while Sammy’s Fox Valley Region Club earned the high school club title.

A list of all collegiate club and high school competitors is available at usatriathlon.org.

Tuscaloosa is a familiar city for USA Triathlon, as it previously hosted both Collegiate Nationals in 2011 and 2012, and Age Group Nationals in 2009 and 2010.

Boulder Coach Neal Henderson on Babbitville Radio

“Combination of the practical and scientific application in working with athletes to help them be better, be faster, be able to do what they do healthier and more sustainably.”

Coach Neal joined Bob Babbitt on Babbitville radio discussing topics such as Leomo, coaching methodology, the hour record, and much more!

Neal Henderson

Women’s Wednesday: Adaptation: The #1 Skill Every Triathlete Needs

by Lisa Ingarfield

Our dog Chester has been struggling lately with walking and supporting his back half. He wobbles, and trips, as his legs aren’t quite sure where to land. However, he hasn’t let these new limits on his abilities change his spirit. He is still exuberant, happy, and full of life. His illness has coincided with my own bout of injuries including a suspected stress fracture. We are both hobbling around the house together. At least I have a partner in injury.

There really is no eloquent way to say this: injuries suck. They just do. Everyone who has been injured knows the drill. There is a moment when you start to notice the pain or soreness, and then there is the negotiation that happens. The ‘is it or isn’t it something serious’ conversation in your head. Sprinkle in some denial when the pain gets stronger and many of us continue to swim, bike, and/or run through it until we really wish we hadn’t. While I hobble around in my protective boot frustrated and annoyed, Chester is still wagging his tail a 1000 times a minute. I am supposed to help him outside when he needs to pee, and yet I struggle to keep up with him. I am stumbling over myself and he is dragging me through the lounge, unfazed that he can no longer move as deftly as before.

I have so much to learn from Chester. While his refusal to do what is needed to heal his back is not unlike the runner or triathlete mentality of powering through an injury, he is just so darn happy about it. He has adapted to his new mobility status without as much as a blink. I know that dogs can experience depression and I would have expected to see some sadness from him as he realized that he couldn’t do what he used to. But it has not manifested. For me on the other hand, I am battling the blues and trying to stay motivated to trainer ride and swim, since I can’t do my favorite of the three. While I generally try to find the lessons in my training, and learn from the challenges and barriers I encounter, it is really hard. When our lives are full, motivation isn’t always available by the bucketful. And an injury drills a hole in the bottom of that bucket.

While we can’t all take injuries in our stride like my furry best pal Chester, we can absorb some of our canine friend’s love and zest for life regardless of our temporary limits. We are all temporarily able bodied, yet our world is designed assuming our able bodiedness is permanent. That message is internalized and so when our abilities change, the feelings of inferiority or brokenness can come flooding in. Adaptation is perhaps one of the most important skills a triathlete or any athlete can have. Chester has adapted (for the most part) and is still super happy about everything. As a teammate who herself has spent a lot of time injured shared with me, this is an opportunity for me to increase my skill in the other two disciplines. And she is right, of course, but I am still annoyed to be in a boot. Yet her advice and watching Chester, is pushing me to work on adapting. In life as in a race, we should try to adapt to the circumstances we find ourselves in. Hone this skill, and we can traverse great distances.

Lisa Ingarfield, Ph.D.

Learn more about Lisa at
Tri to Defi Coaching and Consulting
www.tritodefi.com

Major League Triathlon – the Professional Triathlon League

MLT is the first and only professional triathlon league in the United States. The best male and female athletes in the world compete against each other in a unique swim-bike-run team event. Held in major cities across the US, MLT pros compete in pop-up “stadiums”, allowing for a viewer experience unlike anything before seen in sport. Major League Triathlon is more than just a race; it’s a show. The teams will face off in a super sprint mixed relay format. Each athlete will complete a quick swim, bike and run before tagging their next teammate in line. The first team to have all four athletes cross the finish line will win.

Our first three races of the season will be in Charlotte, NC on May 20th, Atlantic City, NJ on June 3rd, and Vail Valley, CO on August 26th. Total Prize Purse On Offer For Season: $140,000.

Major League Triathlon is thrilled to announce that the 2017 MLT Championship will be held at Edgewater Park in conjunction with NEOCycle presented by Ohio Savings Bank on Saturday, Sept. 9th. This will be the first stop in Ohio for the series.

The triathlon will feature 32 of the best professional triathletes in the world. Each athlete will swim 300 meters, bike 4 miles and run 1 mile at Edgewater Park. This triathlon engages and excites spectators with its unique short, fast-paced structure. The event showcases professional athletes, among them Olympians and other internationally competitive triathletes.

MLT was formed in 2016 with the goal of creating a more spectator-friendly version of triathlon. MLT aims to grow the sport of triathlon on both an amateur and professional level.

Pants on Fire – Cheating in Endurance Sports

From Marathon Investigation
Tuesday, February 21, 2017
Runner Disqualified After Claiming 2nd Place in Fort Lauderdale Half Marathon

The initial 2nd place finisher of the Ft. Lauderdale A1A Half Marathon was disqualified Sunday night. She cut the course.

Splits:

10K – 44:22
13.1 – 1:21:46

These results would equate to a 7:09 minute/mile pace for the 1st 10k and a 5:25 minute/mile pace for remaining 11.08 kilometers.

After the race, she denied having cut the course. She approached other runners and race officials to defend her time. She was on the podium to accept the 2nd place award.

Shortly after the race she posted this to her Strava account.

One member commented on the lack of data. This entry was posted manually and was not linked to any GPS data.

Later that afternoon, she made another Strava entry. This one shows that she did indeed travel the entire course.

She had this labeled as a run, and the total time almost matches her original time for the 1/2 marathon. The cadence data is more consistent with what you would expect on a bike ride, not a run. Also, through the Flyby screen, I was able to confirm that she actually covered this course in the afternoon – long after the race was complete.
Read the full article…

 

RELATED – Age Group Triathletes doping – From Slowtwitch
Ironman AG Champ Gets 4yr Doping Ban
The IRONMAN® Anti-Doping Program announced that American age-group athlete Holly Balogh tested positive for a prohibited substance and has accepted a four-year suspension. Ms. Balogh’s positive sample was collected at the 2016 IRONMAN® North American Championship Texas, which took place on May 14, 2016. Her 4-year suspension commenced, according to Ironman’s release, on July 11, 2016.

Balogh’s sample tested positive for the presence of an exogenous testosterone and/or its metabolites, according to Ironman, which was confirmed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) analysis. Ironman noted that Ms. Balogh did not apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

Read the full story…

Cuba Triathlon Preview

Ten local athletes will travel to Havana, Cuba this week to take part in the Habana Triathlon; 6 of them from Team IPA Endurance. “We are excited to see our athletes participate and experience Cuba and supporting the Cuban athletic scene” said IPA Endurance Co-Founder Bill Garrels. “Team members will participate in either a Sprint or 70.3 race. This is going to be as much a cultural experience as it is a ‘race’ in Cuba. IPA Endurance athletes will be great representatives for the US and the state of Colorado spreading the vibe of helping each other have a great race experience in Cuba.”

The team is also taking donations of wetsuits, goggles, water bottles, etc. to donate to local Cuban triathletes. “This act of International Sports Diplomacy is wonderful … and important.” says Barry Siff, President USAT.

This week brought an unexpected surprise in the form of a bike box embargo from Southwest. Luckily, Chuck Ankeny from local bike shop, Freedom Bikes, stepped in with a loan of Brompton folding bikes. In typical IPA fashion, the athletes are embracing this unexpected challenge. “This race is more about meeting new people and experiencing a different culture, than chasing PRs,” says Donna Shaw.

8 Tips to Make Your Long Run a Bit Less Hellish

From Shut Up & Run by Beth Risdon

Let’s talk about the long run. Let’s talk about the mental fortitude needed to complete the long run.

When I woke up on Saturday morning, my head wasn’t in the game. It was kind of a cool, grey morning. But, that wasn’t really the problem. The problem was wrapping my head around the distance and how long I would be out there. It had been along time since I had done a 16 mile long, steady run on the road. I wasn’t worried about finishing the run, I knew I could that. I was more in my head about the number “16” and how that seemed so far. I’ve run 16 miles so many times before, but it just felt different. I think it’s because I wanted to nail a certain pace and that would mean plodding along, steadily, without many walk breaks like I find on the trails.

There’s no magic to getting motivated for the long run. You just do it. It can be mundane. You are out there a long time. It can get lonely. But, it can also be a time for reflection and zoning out. The long run is a test in perseverance, discipline and determination. And, believe it or not, there are some tips that can make it just a tad easier.

1. Plan a Route You Can Get Excited About. I like to use Map My Run to get creative. There’s nothing like starting a 20 mile run already bored to tears with where you are going. I’d rather drive a bit to start somewhere that inspires me versus following some old worn out route that puts me to sleep. Here was this weekend’s run. I do love the back-roads of Boulder County.

2. Drag Someone Along. Distraction is a wonderful tool. Bring a friend and talk about every mundane thing you can think of like Beyonce’s even fuller breasts since getting pregnant or how long it takes corn to move through your system (this is very easy to figure out. Just keep a diary of when you had corn chowder and when it showed up later). A good friend will also share supplies with you like toilet paper, an extra gel, a tampon or condom (now that really would make your long run more fun).

3. Bring Happy Fuel. If you hate the taste of gels, but you eat them because you are “supposed to” or they were on sale, that’s no fun. Bring along your most favorite candy or gel flavor. Maybe companies should market cocktail themed gummy treats for runners (jam packed with electrolytes and carbs of course) like Rum Runner (get it?), Sex on the Beach (for the wild crowd), Bloody Mary (for those running in the morning or during Sunday brunch time) and Mint Julep (for the Southerners).

4. Tell People Even If They Don’t Care. I like to let a few friends know if I’ve got a really long run (say 16-20 miles) because in my head I think they are cheering me on and that they really care if I finish or not. Somehow it holds me accountable. Ok, maybe my mom just cares, but so what?

Read the remaining four!

Get Techie: Why You Should Love TrainerRoad Almost As Much As I Do

by Alison Freeman

I will be the first to tell you that my love for my indoor bike trainer borders on unnatural. I can justify this in three ways: (1) I am terrified of bike crashes; (2) I am a serious wimp about the cold, the wind, and anything wet; and (3) my indoor bike training is very, very focused. Reason #3 is why my love for my trainer goes hand in hand with my love for TrainerRoad. It’s also why, even if you’re fearless about cars and downhills and weather, you should love it too.

WHAT IS IT?
TrainerRoad is an app (Windows, Mac, iOS and Android) that provides structured workouts for use with your indoor bike trainer. You know how the great thing about Masters Swim is that you just show up, someone tells you what to do, and you get a great workout? TrainerRoad is like that, but for your bike trainer.

WHY SHOULD YOU CARE?
If you want to improve as a cyclist, you need to do more than just go out and bike. Yes, time in the saddle is a key driver of bike fitness, and yes you need to go out on the road to hone your bike handling skills. But if you no longer tip over at stop signs and your fitness gains from time in the saddle have leveled off, then it’s time to get more precise about how you train.

As an athlete, I reached this point a few years into my triathlon career and I soon learned that trying to do specific interval repeats out on the open road was seriously hampered by the existence of stop signs and hills – both up and down. As a coach, I rely on indoor bike workouts for the precision of structured interval workouts as well as the intensity limits that are imposed from doing endurance-level work indoors.

HOW DOES IT WORK?
TrainerRoad one uses of many sources (see table below) to arrive at a basis for power-based training. Translation: with Trainer, Road you don’t need a power meter or a smart trainer to train with power! (ICYMI: Power-based training is the Holy Grail of bike training, because – unlike heart rate – it is an instantaneous measure of effort that is not affected by the weather, your fatigue, your hydration level, or the state of your immune system.)

Knowing your power output is only meaningful if you know where that output falls relative to your ability, so you’ll start off your TrainerRoad career by doing a test to determine your FTP (Functional Threshold Power). Yes, it’s a pretty brutal workout, but knowing your FTP is mission-critical to dialing in the rest of your training. Once you finish the test, TrainerRoad will automatically update your FTP setting and all future workouts will be based on this number and your associated training zones – as in, all workouts are now personalized to your current fitness level.

OK, so now you need a workout. This is where TrainerRoad provides a ton of value: they have a library of over 1,000 workouts, hundreds of which are an hour long, that are all designed to make you a better cyclist. The majority of these workouts include written instructions that function as a virtual coach. It’s kind of like having a coach whispering in your ear during the workout, keeping you focused and educating you about purpose and benefits of the training you’re doing. Many workouts also use the instructions to walk you through cycling drills or specify cadence targets throughout the workout, both of which will ultimately make you a better, stronger cyclist.

So then, how do you decide on which of their 1,000+ workouts you should do today? If you already know the focus of your training, you can pick a workout based on training zone: Endurance, Tempo, Sweet Spot, Threshold, VO2 Max, Anaerobic Capacity, or Sprint. No clue what type of workout you should be doing? They have over 100 training plans you can follow, which vary based on your cycling focus, training volume, and where you are in your training season. Trying to dial in some race-specific intervals? Or maybe your coach has specified a very detailed set of intervals for you? TrainerRoad also allows you to create custom workouts if one of their existing workouts doesn’t meet your needs.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?
First you’ll want to confirm here, https://www.trainerroad.com/equipment-checker, that your equipment is compatible with TrainerRoad. Once you’ve confirmed that you’re good to go, you’ll set up a subscription with TrainerRoad ($12/month or $99/year) and fill out your profile. You can set up auto-sync with TrainingPeaks and Strava so that you get credit for all your hard work, without doing any extra work.

Now that your profile is ready, you’ll want to download the appropriate software for your laptop / desktop / tablet / phone here: https://www.trainerroad.com/download. The last item of business is to pair your ANT+ or Bluetooth speed sensor / power meter / smart trainer to the software. Then just knock out your fitness test and you’re on your way to becoming a better cyclist.