Mile High Endurance Podcast: Run Your Fat Off

Another great book from Dr. Jason Karp. Hear key insights on how to get the fat off and keep it off with the book “Run Your Fat Off”. We also talk about the definition of metabolic efficiency, injury prevention and more. Hosts Rich Soares and Khem Suthiwan. Listen to the podcast.

 

 

Feedback Omnium featured in Tiny House

From USA Triathlon

Olympian Katie Zaferes and husband and fellow elite triathlete Tommy built a custom tiny home in Santa Cruz, Calif., this offseason and were featured on the FYI reality show Tiny House Nation on March 25.

Golden, Colorado’s Feedback Sports was featured as the ultra-compact Omnium trainer and folding work stand fit well in small spaces…

When recently-married pro triathletes Katie and Tommy Zaferes daydreamed about their first home together, they didn’t envision a sprawling estate or even a tidy colonial. There were no plans for a tricked-out home gym, an indoor lap pool or soaring walls where they could display their impressive collection of awards from racing around the world. In fact, the couple wanted just the opposite. They wanted a tiny home.

Enter Tiny House Nation, the popular FYI reality show that hooks people up with their very own, custom-designed mini-home. On March 25, the Zaferes’ and their brand-new Santa, Cruz, Calif., house — all 370 square feet of it — were featured on an episode. Here, we caught up with the couple about their stint on reality TV and details about their dainty dwelling.

Read the full article

Watch the full episode: http://www.fyi.tv/shows/tiny-house-nation/season-4/episode-12

Women’s Wednesday: What to Wear for a 5k

From Dash-N-Dine

By Cheri Felix

Last week we talked about why you should do the Dash & Dine. Now that we’ve got that covered, this week I’m going to give you a bunch of free advice that will vary between sort of helpful to did she really say that? Let’s get started.

If you’re new to the Dash & Dine or to running or racing a 5K you should stick with me. If you’re totally a master and have the latest rage; a gear room and you run all the time, you should stick with me too. Okay, what to wear. I find that when I run I feel like I’m constantly on the verge of menopause. Meaning, I get hot easily. So it’s important to wear whatever you want and not get caught up in what everyone else is wearing and how much their clothing and shoes cost. It’s all about layers and keeping dry. Wear something you can take off and tie around your waist and yes, if it’s raining do not wear your puffy painted sweatshirt. You will be sorry if you do that. Final word; dress comfortably and know that it’s a 5k. You can wear anything for a 5k.

How serious will this be?

I’m going to be very honest because I think you can handle it. IT DOESN’T MATTER. This is like taking a test in high school; eyes on your own desk. If someone wants to act like they might get asked to join the NIKE running team, then great. For the rest of us, we are really just out there to push ourselves and to get some good photos to post on Facebook. What time should you get there? Well, race starts at 6:30. If you need to sign up on site, arrive early enough to to do that. Plan for time to warm up, which can mean calisthenics, push-ups, jumping jacks or running up the hill and back a few times. (Revolution Running will lead a FREE warm up with dynamic drills if you would like to join.) I tend to go for the Jack Black version; I talk a lot and try to look cool. And yes, you’ll need to pee. Do that when you get there, when the line is short(er).

In summary, the Dash & Dine is inclusive.

Whether your 5k time is 17:21 (yes, there are those people) or 49:19, you’ll fit in. You may feel a little like a fish out of water but that’s okay. It’s okay to feel a bit uncomfortable. It’s okay to wonder what you were thinking when you signed up. It’s okay to worry that all the other cool kids will be faster than you. When we feel uncomfortable and we still show up, that’s when the good stuff happens. Next time we’ll cover what it feels like to run a 5k and what you might want to start doing in order to get ready.

See you soon!

11 Ways to get to Kona

For long-course triathletes, the IRONMAN World Championship is the pot of gold at the end of a rewarding season of training. Here’s your roadmap.

Every year, more than 2,200 hard-working athletes have the chance to compete at the iconic IRONMAN World Championship on the Island of Hawai’i. It was there that Dave Scott and Mark Allen battled head to head in 1989’s “Iron War.”

It was there that IRONMAN legend Paula Newby-Fraser earned her historic eight victories. It continues to be where thousands of athletes have overcome illness and injury, fighting through their own—or sometimes others’—mental, emotional, and physical hardships.

The historic finish line on Ali’i Drive has become synonymous with big dreams, and even bigger accomplishments. It is the place where the IRONMAN mantra, “ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE”, pulses to the beat of the Hawaiian drum.

And we want to help you get there.

  1. Standard qualification: Every year, age-group athletes compete in full-distance races globally for one of only a handful of highly coveted slots to the IRONMAN World Championship. This route demands a lot of blood, sweat, and sometimes tears, as athletes compete against their fellow age-groupers for slots. Each of the 40 full-distance IRONMAN races in the 2017 qualifying series offers a different number of Kona qualification slots, which are then divided up according to the size of their respective age-group
  2. Qualify in China: Once again, this year our IRONMAN 70.3 races in China will be the only half-distance events where athletes can qualify for Kona. Pick a race, and get planning, you’re in for a treat:IRONMAN 70.3 Liuzhou: April 1, 2017—30 qualifying slots.
    IRONMAN 70.3 Qujing: August 27, 2017—30 qualifying slots.
  3. IRONMAN Legacy Program: The IRONMAN Legacy Program, now in its sixth year, rewards our most loyal athletes with a chance to compete in Kona. These athletes became eligible for selection based on a) completed a minimum of 12 full-distance IRONMAN races; b) never started the iconic IRONMAN World Championship; c) have completed at least one IRONMAN event in each of the 2015 and 2016 seasons; and d) be registered for an IRONMAN event in 2017. This year, we have added 100 additional Legacy slots to the annual 100, for a total of 200.
  4. IRONMAN Kona Drawing benefiting The IRONMAN Foundation: This year, The IRONMAN Foundation is offering a drawing for 10 slots, with a suggested (tax deductible) donation of $50.00 to benefit the Foundation’s charitable giveback in communities around the world. The drawing will begin on Friday, February 24, 2017, and finish on Friday, March 24, 2017 at 12 pm ET . Selected athletes will be announced on Friday, March 31. Click here to enter the drawing.Related Article: 39 Things You Didn’t Know About Kona
  5. Physically Challenged Open/Exhibition Division Drawing: To honor the vision of IRONMAN co-founders, John and Judy Collins, IRONMAN remains committed to providing athletes of all abilities a means of entry to the world’s most challenging and prestigious one-day endurance event. Through the Physically Challenged Open/Exhibition Division Drawing, five physically challenged athletes from around the world will be drawn to receive entry to the 2017 IRONMAN World Championship. Further guidelines and registration information can be found at ironman.com/pcdrawing.
  6. IRONMAN Foundation annual Kona auction: Beginning on April 1, 2017, one slot will be auctioned off each week for five weeks on eBay. The first four slots will benefit the IRONMAN Foundation Community Fund and will be 100 percent tax deductible less the value of the race registration (minimum opening bid of $25,000). Visit the IRONMAN Foundation website for more information. For the second year, The IRONMAN Foundation will offer a fifth slot (also 100 percent tax deductible) with 100 percent of the funds going to support Women For Tri — a program of the IRONMAN Foundation that works to increase female participation at all levels of triathlon (minimum opening bid of $25,000).
  7. Women For Tri slots: The Women For Tri initiative will also allocate one additional slot to a female triathlete who both a) embodies the spirit of Women For Tri through a compelling personal story that motivates and inspires other women to “Tri”; and b) raises or contributes at least $25,000 to the Women For Tri charitable, tax-deductible effort. This slot will be distributed via an application process. Additional details are available at the IRONMAN Foundation website.
  8. IRONMAN Executive Challenge: With 25 slots set aside for the IRONMAN World Championship, IRONMAN XC creates a true competition among peers at XC qualifying events, with top performers awarded IRONMAN World Championship slots. The program brings together executives at select events around the globe for a unique and ultra-personalized IRONMAN race weekend experience. This turn-key program streamlines all logistics surrounding an IRONMAN event and provide a white glove level of service. Additionally, family and guests experience VIP treatment throughout event weekend with a front row seat to all the action.
  9. Bonus Kona slots: This year, bonus slots to the IRONMAN World Championship were allocated to a few select races in different regions. Ten lucky athletes won the chance to race at Kona via a drawing relating to IRONMAN Boulder, taking place on June 11. IRONMAN Australia, taking place on May 7, 2017, provided a similar promotion with 10 entries to Kona. In the coming weeks, information will be provided on on a special opportunity for athletes racing at IRONMAN Maastricht – Limburg on August 6, 2017.
  10. Japan to Whistler to Kona! This year, an additional 20 qualifying slots to the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona, Hawai’i, are up for grabs for Japanese nationals racing IRONMAN Canada. These slots will be allocated based on the athlete’s Age-Group Ranking upon conclusion of the race. Click here for more information.
  11. IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii, Honu to Kona: Thanks to the Island of Hawai’i Visitor’s Bureau, 10 Kona slots are on offer to anyone who registers for IRONMAN 70.3 Hawaii by May 1, 2017. Click here for more information.

Outdoor Divas Preview: The PERFECT First Tri

By Kirsten McCay

Hey Ladies! The PERFECT First Tri For You Or Someone You Know!
Have you always thought how fun/awesome/challenging/life-changing it would be to complete a triathlon, but you thought you could NEVER do something like that? Well think again! Without Limits, the top multisport racing company in Colorado, has something just for you!
The Outdoor Divas sprint distance triathlon has been awarded the best women’s event in Colorado by Competitor Magazine and is a safe place for women on all ages, shapes, sizes, abilities, and backgrounds to come together and experience what it is like to become a triathlete.

A few things make this race ideal for beginners…

1. It’s a women only event so you can feel supported and safe.
2. It’s capped at 600 women so the numbers aren’t overwhelming in the swim and transition areas.
3. It’s a sprint distance which is 750 meter swim, 12.9 mile bike, and 3.1 mile run/walk.
4. Each swim wave only has 50 swimmers so there is plenty of space to avoid getting touched and swam over by other swimmers.
5. There is a swim wave designated for first-timers only with more safety and support, and fewer fast, intimidating swimmers.
6. The water is warm enough in July you don’t need to wear a wetsuit.
7. You can use ANY type of bike to ride. You don’t need any fancy gear.
8. You can walk the entire run.
9. If you are a mom of little ones, there will be a kid sitting area during the race so you can focus on yourself and your race.
10. There is no time cut offs so every single person can finish!!

This race is held at the Union Reservoir in Longmont which is fairly flat with smooth roads, and amazing views.
When my mom turned 50, I gave her a race entry into an all women triathlon. She was so scared but I promised her she would cross the finish line with my help. She had never been an athlete, was overweight, and had arthritis in her knees and hips. The race she did was similar to the Outdoor Divas Sprint Triathlon and with the positive environment, the support from the volunteers, families, and other women racing, and the sense of accomplishment she felt when she crossed the finish line, she went on to race 3 more all-women triathlons. She considers these some of her top accomplishments in her life!
I want that for each and every one of you! Please share this with any woman you know who may want to challenge herself, accomplish something incredible, try something new, have an excuse to get into shape, looking for a new hobby, or just want to have a fun experience surrounded by other positive healthy women.
Check out all the race info today and make sure you register ASAP! Due to the low cap, this race has sold out the past 9 years. Last year reached capacity on June 20th so please take advantage of the early registration!

Monday Masters: SwimLabs joins forces with SafeSplash Swim School

From SafeSplash Swim School

We are so excited to welcome SwimLabs Swim School to our family! SwimLabs’ unique training facilities are indoors, with small, warm-water pools specially designed with 360-degree video feedback technology that lets swimmers of all ages and abilities instantly view their own strokes and compare them against several elite U.S. Olympic swimmers. Check them out at http://www.swimlabs.com/.

Here’s the press release: http://hubs.ly/H06vLT80

Challenge Regensburg: bucket list European race-cation this summer

Hey U.S. Triathletes – have you ever wanted to try a non-U.S., destination race? Challenge Regensburg, an iron-distance race in Regensburg, Germany, features a stunning host city and surrounding area, and incredibly warm and welcoming Bavarian hospitality. AND, race organizers have put together an incentive package for international athletes with a number of benefits, including an exceptional deal on accommodation (think stay 5 nights/pay for 4, or stay 7 nights/pay for 5—and that’s on top of the already discounted event rate), a dedicated mechanic (to help with those post-travel bike builds), and more.

Want to know more about the race? Check out Colorado industry insider Holly Bennett’s Facebook gallery and write up from last year’s inaugural race. Holly says, “The race organizers are husband and wife team Tom and Sonja Tajsich. Sonja is a beloved professional triathlete who has graced the top 5 podium in Kona and who knows all the important details that make a race athlete-focused and athlete-friendly. Their intense passion for the sport shines through in every detail.”

Register HERE

And use special code IOL-Z99H-F1AR-SSBB for the International Athlete Program.

More notes from Holly if you want to include: “I know a lot of people are nervous about racing internationally, or they don’t want to deal with long flights and the hassles of traveling with a bike. That’s why this race is really perfect for them. Munich is a direct flight from many US cities (including Denver), and then it’s just a short drive to Regensburg (1.5 hrs). With a dedicated mechanic for international athletes, there’s no need to worry if you don’t feel confident putting your bike back together yourself, or if you just want to be sure there’s someone convenient to give it a once over. And the hotel deal is fantastic—the rates are really affordable and include breakfast & wifi, plus you get the extra night(s) free, and the hotels are right in the city center, walking distance to nearly everything. Plus, Challenge race entries are far more affordable than IM!”

New Ironman Rules for 2017

From Triathlete.com

Photo: Adam Hodges / Shutterstock.com

What competitors need to know:

Disc brakes are a go.

Following the lead of the International Triathlon Union ITU, who approved the use of disc brakes for competition in 2016, Ironman will allow road and triathlon bikes equipped with disc bikes at all Ironman and 70.3 events.

Cell phones are allowed on the course—kind of.

Two-way communication devices, such as walkie-talkies and cell phones, have long been banned on the race course. It’s been a difficult rule for officials to enforce, especially as more and more athletes use their cell phones for bike/run data or race-day tracking. As a sign of the times, Ironman will now allow cell phones on the course, but that isn’t an open invitation to live-tweet your race: athletes using cell phones in a “distractive manner”—in their words, “making and receiving phone calls, sending and receiving text messages, playing music, using social media, taking photographs and mounting the device to a bike for purposes of using the device like a bike computer.”—will be disqualified.

Read more at “6 Ironman Rule Changes You Should Know About” at Triathlete.com 

Monday Masters: Working the Recovery

Photo via Simone Castrovillari

Courtesy of Eney Jones

Everyone works the bottom of their stroke, we reach, then push and propel ourselves forward. But we are dealing with two different elements while swimming, water and air. It is easy to be more deliberate underwater in a denser material, but rarely do swimmers work the “recovery” part of their stroke. They even hear the word recovery and they slow down and relax, and place their catch. Instead we need to speed up our airspeed as I call Split Tempo.

Having more speed and alacrity in the air will create a more deliberate forceful catch. Speed creates power. I have always found this helpful in Open Water but last week end watched it in Caeleb Dressel’s 40:40 100 relay split. In sprinting you want more length in the front of your stroke. The higher you can be in the water the easier it is to push yourself forward.

When you tell swimmers to speed up their tempo often they shorten their stroke. Working on Split Tempo will allow the stroke to be longer under water and faster through the air. In Caelebs’ 100 free split in the relay each arm underwater was .33 seconds. His left arm straighter and faster thru the air was .21 seconds and his right more arced arm thru the air was .23 seconds for a 1.1 second rotation of both arms. This is quite amazing because his is 6’3” inches tall. On a Finis Tempo trainer setting #1 set at 1:1 the beep is when his left arm hits.

See Video Caeleb Dressel 400 Medley Relay A-Final.

Katie Ledecky’s overall Tempo in the mile is 1:37 ( she is 6 feet tall) but once again she is faster thru the air than the water. Usually the difference is not as pronounced as Dressels’, but that is why most people are looking at his feet or just feeling a wave go by.

There are a few ways to work this:

  • On land – Keep you upper thoracic mobile. Everyone uses cables to mimic swimming, but have the cables behind you and punch forward and down. Before a race rather than swing your arms around bend over and cross front and back ( think Phelps) .
  • In the water – Use shells, biscuit sand dollars, whiffle balls or tennis balls with holes: something that will fill up underneath and drain thru the air.
  • Drill – Grab paddles over the front end, slice thru the air, punch the catch.

Be deliberate and be fast thru the air and you will find your times dropping from easily from there.

Eney Jones has achieved remarkably diverse success as a leading pool, open water and Ironman triathlon swimmer, and is also a yoga instructor.

  • Masters National Champion 100-200-400-500-1500-1650 5k freestyle 2009
  • Open Water 5k Champion Perth Australia, May 2008.
  • National Masters Champion 200-400-1500 freestyle Champion, Portland Oregon, August, 2008.
  • Overall Champion Aumakua 2.4k Maui Hawaii, September 2008
  • Waikiki Rough Water Swim 3rd place 2006, second place Overall 2009, 3rd place 2012
  • European Record Holder and Masters Swimming Champion, 2005. Records included 200, 400, 800, 1500 m freestyle
  • Over twenty time finalist in U.S. Swimming Nationals, including Olympic Trials 1980
  • Gold medal NCAA 800 yd freestyle relay 1979, silver Medalist 200 yd freestyle 1979. United States National Team 1979-1980.
  • Professional Triathlete 1983-1991. First woman out of the water in every Hawaiian Ironman participated (6).

Read the full article

Mike Sandrock: Zeiger, Lindley, Wellington. 3 women, 3 champions, 3 books

From the Daily Camera

Joanna Zeiger, seen here racing in the 2010 Boulder Peak Triathlon, will speak about her just-published “The Champion Mindset” March 10 at Flatirons Running. “Surfacing,” by Siri Lindley, also a former world champion triathlete, also has just been published. (Cliff Grassmick / Staff Photographer)

Just about a year ago this time, I was standing near the Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles with a large crowd of running fans watching the exciting finish of the women’s U.S. Olympic marathon trials.

Early leader Shalane Flanagan was faltering in the heat, and Boulder’s Kara Goucher looked to have chance at a top-three finish. (She ended up an oh-so-close fourth).

We were not the only ones watching.

Joanna Zeiger, Boulder’s seven-time Olympic trials participant over three sports, was just about to begin her final six-mile lap when she heard the loud cheers for the fast-approaching leaders.

“I decided to wait and cheer on (winner) Amy Cragg ,” Zeiger, 46, said in a recent phone interview. “I hung out to see who was in the lead. Amy was amazing and seeing her gave just such a chill up my spine and motivation to get through the last lap.”

There was really no need for Zeiger to finish. She could have easily joined the roughly 50 women who pulled out of the marathon that day, done in by the near-90 degree heat. Zeiger’s spot in triathloning history is secure. There was, however, no way she was not going to finish the marathon.

“I knew it was going to be a major struggle,” said Zeiger, who has suffered daily debilitating rib and nerve pain ever since a bike crash in the 2009 70.3 World Triathlon Championships. “I was prepared for a long, tough day; every time I saw a runner walking back to the finish after dropping out, it strengthened my resolve, and I thought, ‘I am going to get through this.'”

Get through it Zeiger did, fueled by her “champion mindset,” which, appropriately, is the name of her new book.

On March 10, Zeiger will talk about “The Champion Mindset: An Athlete’s Guide to Mental Toughness” at Flatirons Running in south Boulder. She will also show footage of her Ironman World Championship win.

In a nice coincidence, “The Champion Mindset” is one of three new books by world champion female triathletes with local ties.

Long-time resident and former world-ranked No. 1 and 2001 world champion Siri Lindley, now a coach of elites based out of RallySport, tells her riveting story in “Surfacing: From the Depths of Self-Doubt to Winning Big & Living Fearlessly,” while four-time Hawaii Ironman world champ Chrissie Wellington, a native of England who lived in Boulder during her top competitive years, is out with “To the Finish Line: A World Champion Triathlete’s Guide to Your Perfect Race.”

Read the full article