Bolder Boulder celebrates 40 years of city’s iconic race

40 Years Bold,” a new book produced by the Daily Camera and the Bolder Boulder, celebrates 40 years of Boulder’s iconic 10K race.

From the Daily Camera

The cover of the new book about the history of the Bolder Boulder, “40 Years Bold,” captures well the spirit of this iconic 10K road race that will weave its way through the streets of Boulder for the 40th time on Memorial Day.

Daily Camera photographer Jeremy Papasso’s picture shows the packed start of the A wave of the 2014 Bolder Boulder.

Sprinting off the line, smiles on their faces, are some young, high school runners, caught in midstride. In the lead is a fitlooking runner in a Batman costume. Another costumed runner is to his left, while just behind them is a female A wave runner. Over on the left side of the start is a masters runner.

Behind them, filling the cover, is a mass of densely packed runners of varying shapes and sizes. Here we see the competitiveness and size of the Bolder Boulder — surely no other race has as many fast runners in front.

Behind these fast runners, as the book shows, come some of the tens of thousands of other runners and walkers, friends and family, who follow the A wavers into the Folsom Field finish. These are some of the ingredients that make the Bolder Boulder an integral part of Boulder, a rite of spring that many of us run, walk, volunteer at or simply watch.

Then there is the book title: “40 Years Bold.” Appropriate, for the Bolder Boulder has long been bold and innovative in making changes and setting the tone for the Running Boom, which was in its infancy in that first Bolder back in 1979.

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BRAVER BOLDER STRONGER. Triathlon workshops designed by women for women.

Join 303Triathlon‘s Bill Plock with Rachel Joyce and Dana Platin via Facebook Live from TriBella on Thursday, May 10th at 10:45am (MDT).

PRESS RELEASE – MAY 7, 2018
BRAVER BOLDER STRONGER. Triathlon workshops designed by women for women.

Boulder, Colorado USA: Rachel Joyce, professional triathlete; 2017 IRONMAN Boulder Champion, and Dana Platin, leadership coach and founder of The Warmi Project, are collaborating on an innovative local workshop series. Each workshop offers a unique blend of practical triathlon skills and mental tools designed to have an immediate benefit on performance. The series will take place at the University of Colorado, Boulder Recreation Center and single workshop registration is available:

Swim Braver Workshop: Sunday May 20 10:00am-3:00pm
Bike Bolder Workshop: Sunday June 3 10:00am-3:00pm
Run Stronger Workshop: Sunday June 24 10:00am-3:00pm

The Swim Braver session will develop the ability to squash the inner critic and lead with a BRAVER self-mentor both on and off the race course. The Bike Bolder session will progress the courage needed to push the comfort zone in order to fear less, take calculated risks, and move BOLDER through life. The Run Stronger session will explore the top three strategies to crush
goals to run STRONGER in life.

“Since transitioning from the corporate world to professional triathlon in 2005, I have learned a huge amount about swimming, biking and running,” said Rachel Joyce. “I understand how the development of everyday skills are essential to truly showcase fitness in the triathlon arena. I am excited to share my experiences through the Braver Bolder Stronger workshops and to be partnering with Dana Platin. Dana’s depth of knowledge and women’s leadership portfolio emphasizes the relevance of mental tools, which is often the missing piece of the jigsaw.”

“Human Interest Group is proud to support this engaging workshop series,” said Heather Nocickis, “Rachel and Dana have created a relevant, effective content program based on their respective paths to success. The result of their vision for women’s leadership is a blueprint that builds confidence and drives change, empowering others to break through barriers – in sport or in the corporate arena.”

“As a passionate, avid athlete, I use my participation in triathlons, cycling, and mountaineering as a way to set personal goals that push my limits beyond what I thought was possible,” says Dana Platin. “Personal triumphs and setbacks have taught me about gratitude, grit, and grace. My 20-years in leadership development, training, and program management are lessons learned for other women aspiring to crush their fear to accomplish their goals. I am thrilled to
partner with Rachel Joyce on this powerful experience that uses the journey of triathlon to tap into that braver, bolder, stronger version of ourselves.”

Each workshop will kick off with a challenging physical component. The swim/bike/run training sessions will be coached by Rachel, instructing on technique and key skills specific to triathlon, such as open water sighting and adapting swim strokes for different conditions; climbing and descending proficiency on the bike; and, finishing with a strong run in the final leg of a triathlon.

This will be followed by lunch and refreshments. Dana will advance discussion during the afternoon sessions, further examining potential barriers to empowerment and those tools and choices that contribute to success and define what braver, bolder, stronger means for women’s leadership and participation.

About Braver Bolder Stronger: Braver Bolder Stronger Workshops is a partnership between Rachel Joyce, Dana Platin and The Human Interest Group. For more details and event registration, click HERE.

Media Enquiries: The Human Interest Group
Heather Novickis email: heather@humaninterestgroup.org
Phone: 303.517.0624

Parking for Workshops
The workshops will take place at CU Student Recreation Center, located at 1855 Pleasant Street in Boulder, CO. We recommend parking at Lot 169 (free parking on weekends) or the Folsom Field Parking Garage (paid parking) as shown here.

Women for Tri Provides 450 Additional slots for 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships

400 Top performing female athletes based on 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Age Group Rankings and 50 top performing female athletes from Standard Bank IRONMAN 70.3 Durban provided with additional bonus qualification spots
TAMPA, Fla. (May 7, 2018) – Women For Tri®, a program of the IRONMAN Foundation®, today announced that a total of 450 additional women have earned an invitation to race in the 2018 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship taking place in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa on September 1 and 2, 2018. After previously announcing 50 additional slots allocated to the Standard Bank IRONMAN 70.3 Durban race for top finishing female athletes, Women For Tri is providing 400 additional slots for top-ranked female athletes based on their total 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Age Group Ranking (AGR) points. The additional slots will be utilized by Women For Tri, a program launched by IRONMAN to welcome and empower new female triathletes to be a part of the sport’s continued growth in high-level competition.

“We are excited to welcome top age-group athletes from around the world to this year’s IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in South Africa,” said Kyrsten Sinema, Chair of the Women For Tri Advisory Committee and U.S. Representative from Arizona. “Following in the footsteps of the women who raced in support of Women For Tri last year in Chattanooga, we hope the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship inspires women around the world to reimagine their potential as triathletes.”

Allocating these 400 additional slots based on IRONMAN 70.3 AGR will create a deeper field of female athletes and maintain the integrity and prestige of an IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship event. The AGR system measures an athlete’s performance in IRONMAN 70.3 races throughout the 2018 qualifying year.

All net proceeds from the registration revenue of the 400 additional slots will go towards supporting Women For Tri’s TriClub grant program. To date, nearly $250,000 has been awarded by this program to TriClubs around the world to support women’s engagement initiatives, including bringing first-timers into the sport. Since its inception in 2015, Women For Tri has seen an 18% increase in female participation in IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events, totaling more than 66,000 female athletes globally.

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is the pinnacle event in the global IRONMAN 70.3 series. The 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship race will be a two-day event with the professional and age group women racing on Saturday, September 1 and the professional and age-group men racing on Sunday, September 2. Nearly 5,000 athletes will qualify to race in the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship from among over 100 IRONMAN 70.3 races around the world throughout the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 qualifying season.

For questions about Women For Tri programming, please contact womenfortri@ironman.com. For media related inquiries, please contact press@ironman.com.

Passing the Torch: Educating the Next Generation of the Outdoor Industry

From Elevation Outdoors
By Harper Brown

The outdoor industry is booming, there’s no doubt about it. According to the Outdoor Industry Association, the outdoor recreation economy recorded $887 billion in consumer spending in 2016, a whopping figure that accounted for two percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product that same year. The industry as a whole generates roughly 7.6 million direct jobs in the U.S., and that number is on the rise — up from 6.1 million direct jobs logged in 2012. The outdoor industry is in the midst of a massive growth spurt, and that growth is spawning an industry-wide search for the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts, stewards of the land, champions of nature and sustainably-minded conservationist willing to grab the torch and carry on the business of inspiring responsible recreation in the great outdoors. And that search has officially landed on college campuses throughout the country.

On day two of the 2018 Outdoor Retailer + Snow Show in Denver, Colorado, the Outdoor Industry Association presented “The Next Wave of Outdoorist: The Importance of Growing Outdoor Communities on College Campuses” to an attentive crowd in the Colorado Convention Center. The panel included Dr. Carine Feyten (Texas Woman’s University), Alondra Martinez (Texas Woman’s University student), Scott Wyatt (president of Southern Utah University), Abigail Wyatt (Southern Utah University student) and Ian Levin (Senior Deputy Director for the Outdoor Foundation) as the moderator. The panel discussion highlighted the importance of college campuses promoting students to spend time outside; ultimately encouraging better performance, a closer college community, and more college students pursing careers in the outdoor industry.

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Blind runners form a tight community

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Blind runner Amelia Dickerson, right, gets congratulated by her friend and guide Grace Dill, left, after finishing the 5 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

From the Denver Post

By Danika Worthington

About 15 participants enjoy the social nature of race

Members of the tight-knit group pumped up one another at the starting line.

Shoes were retied last minute as the national anthem played from the speakers. When it finished, the announcer asked blind and visually impaired runners to come forward.

The group made their way up. Crosby, a guide dog for runner Kerry Kuck, stood at the front of the pack. The runners prepared for their starting cue, which was a minute before the rest of the participants tackled the 5-mile route at the annual Cherry Creek Sneak.

“Crosby the dog is going to lead the way,” the announcer barked out to the crowd. Then, the start was signaled. The runners and their guides took off, breaking away down the first stretch.

The Colorado Springs based U.S. Association of Blind Athletes partnered with Achilles Denver, the local chapter of an international organization that gives athletes with disabilities a community of support, and Lending Sight, a Colorado sports club that connects those with good vision with blind or visually impaired runners, to recruit about 15 runners and guides to race Sunday.

For some, the sport is about escaping isolation or exploring freedom. For others, it is a fun form of exercise. Regardless of the motivation, the athletes all expressed a similar theme: Blind runners have a tight community in Denver.

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USA Triathlon Collegiate Club and High School National Championships

By Rich Soares
303Triathlon.com

USAT COLLEGIATE CLUB AND HIGH SCHOOL NATIONALS
TUSCALOOSA, AL
APRIL 27-28, 2018

Go to any high school or collegiate contest and you notice the unmistakable energy of youthful athletes and fans. School chants, fight songs and air horns fill the air, while flags, mascots and costumes create a visually vivid landscape. This weekend’s USA Triathlon Collegiate Club and High School Nationals delivered an experience that was exponentially more electric than your typical collegiate competition. A rolling sea of team tents covered 1100 athletes from 109 colleges. Schools from coast to coast brought their school spirit, competitiveness and the best demonstrations of sportsmanship at what is arguably the highest level of competition for High School and Collegiate triathletes.

While they competed fiercely for individual and team standings, athletes gave each other high-fives and hugs at the start and finish lines. They encouraged each other on the course and celebrated in the post-race ice bath pools. For all the competitive grit, sprint finishes, and gut-wrenching efforts, the culture of triathlon was evidenced in encouragement on the course and concern at the medical tent.

Due to heavy rainfall in Tuscaloosa the past two weeks, the Holt Dam spillway gates were opened by local officials to avoid flooding. Heightened volume in the Black Warrior River necessitated that the gates remain open through race weekend, resulting in overly strong currents that were deemed unsafe for swimming. USAT officials announced a course change mid-week. All races will be shifted from a triathlon (swim-bike-run) to a duathlon (run-bike-run) to ensure athlete safety.

Colorado teams had a great showing. At the Olympic distance, CU’s Men’s and Women’s teams came in second to the Naval Academy and UC Berkeley respectively. CSU Women placed 5th and Men 9th. USAFA Women came in 11th and Men’s 12th. Colorado School of Mines Women came in 47th and Men 55th. Combined scores put CU in 2nd, CSU in 7th, USAFA 9th and CSM in 49th.

CU Buffs Roy Madrid and Timothy Winslow finished 2nd and 3rd behind the University of California’s Sean Harrington, who took the Men’s race with a 1:33:58. The Women’s champion was Stephanie Murphy of US Naval Academy and CSU’s Katrina Lems was Colorado’s first Woman in 8th place. In the High School contest, Austin Podhajsky and Jack Deweerdt from Parker, Colorado took 2nd and 3rd respectively behind the Male winner Drew Shellenberger. Cassidy Hickey of Parker, Colorado took 2nd behind the Female winner Gillian Cridge.

 

Hayden Cog Run looms as running and biking race season approaches

From The Steamboat Pilot & Today

by Joel Reichenberger

Matt Milde runs down the Cog road near Hayden during last year’s Hayden Cog Run. The grueling early-season running race is back this year, one of the first events of the running and biking season.

Skiing and snowboarding season has already given way to running and cycling season for many local athletes who started airing up their tires and lacing up their sneakers before the lifts stopped turning. The competitive season for those athletes is coming up quickly, as well.

The first event of the Steamboat Springs Running Series is less than two weeks away, and an important deadline is even closer than that.

The Hayden Cog Run will celebrate its 40th anniversary on May 5 with a grueling early-season test, 8.4-miles up the Cog road in Hayden.

Signing up for the race in years past has usually included a race t-shirt, and it does again this year, but years of leftover boxes of shirts have encouraged organizers to set Wednesday as a deadline for signing up online and getting a shirt.

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NINE U.S. ELITE ATHLETES SET TO COMPETE AT ITU WORLD TRIATHLON BERMUDA ON SATURDAY

From USA Triathlon

Kasper earned her first career WTS medal in 2017. Scottie T/ITU Media

Kasper leads American contingent at No. 2 on women’s start list

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Nine U.S. elite athletes are set to compete on Saturday at ITU World Triathlon Bermuda, a first-time ITU World Triathlon Series destination.

The Olympic-distance race covers a 1,500-meter swim, 40-kilometer bike and 10-kilometer run. The action begins with a two-lap swim in the calm waters of Hamilton’s harbor. From there, athletes will complete 10 laps of a 4k bike course along the coastline, climbing and descending the infamous “Corkscrew Hill” with each lap. The four-lap run then takes competitors through the spectator-lined streets of downtown Hamilton and into the National Stadium for the finish.

The elite men race first at 12:06 p.m. ET (1:06 p.m. local time), and the elite women follow at 3:06 p.m. ET (4:06 p.m. local time). Both races will be broadcast live online at triathlonlive.tv. Both races will also air on NBC’s Olympic Channel, with coverage starting at 1 p.m. ET.

Six U.S. women will toe the line, led by Kristen Kasper (North Andover, Mass.) at No. 2 on the start list. Kasper has had a strong start to the 2018 season, collecting one gold and one silver in ITU World Cup events in addition to a fourth-place finish at the rainy and technical WTS season opener in Abu Dhabi. Katie Zaferes (Santa Cruz, Calif.) will be on the hunt for medals after crashing out of the Abi Dhabi race in March. Zaferes finished the 2017 WTS season ranked third overall, and has 11 career podiums in the series to date.

Taylor Spivey (Redondo Beach, Calif.), Taylor Knibb (Washington, D.C.), Summer Cook (Thornton, Colo.) and Chelsea Burns (Seattle, Wash.) will also be in the mix. Knibb and Spivey each cracked the WTS podium for the first time last year, earning silver medals in Leeds and Edmonton respectively. Cook was the 2016 ITU World Triathlon Edmonton champion and finished last season ranked ninth in the overall WTS standings. Burns has two ITU World Cup podiums to her name, but is still chasing her first WTS hardware.

The women will face a strong international field, headlined by Bermuda’s own two-time ITU world champion Flora Duffy. Duffy won six of the seven WTS races she started last year, and will be hard to beat as she races on the streets of her hometown. Also on the start list is Rachel Klamer of the Netherlands, who is the current WTS leader after taking the win in Abu Dhabi. Other top contenders on the women’s side include 2017 U23 World Championships silver medalist Melanie Santos of Portugal and Canada’s Joanna Brown, who finished the 2017 WTS season ranked seventh overall.

Visit wts.triathlon.org for a complete women’s start list.

Representing the U.S. in the men’s race are Ben Kanute (Phoenix, Ariz.), Kevin McDowell (Phoenix, Ariz.) and Eli Hemming (Kiowa, Colo). All three athletes had outstanding 2017 seasons, and all three earned USA Triathlon Athlete of the Year recognition (Kanute in the non-drafting category, McDowell in the draft-legal/ITU category and Hemming in the U23 category).

Kanute is coming off a strong 2017, highlighted by a second-place finish at the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship and a win at the Island House Triathlon. He opened the 2018 season with a top-20 finish at the WTS season opener in Abu Dhabi, and followed that with a silver-medal performance at the Sarasota-Bradenton CAMTRI North American Championships.

McDowell earned two ITU World Cup medals in 2017, and has shown he is still in good form this year by placing top-10 at two ITU World Cup events in March. Hemming has also raced well to open the season. The 2017 U23 national champion topped the podium at the Clermont CAMTRI Sprint Triathlon American Cup in March, and a week later edged Kanute for the win at the Sarasota-Bradenton CAMTRI North American Championships.

Henri Schoeman of South Africa holds the No. 1 spot on the men’s start list. Schoeman has been unstoppable in 2018, taking the win in Abu Dhabi and earning the Commonwealth Games title a month later. Defending world champion Mario Mola of Spain is in the No. 2 position after placing second to Schoeman in Abu Dhabi. Other top contenders on the men’s start list include 2017 ITU World Triathlon Grand Final winner Vincent Luis and 2017 U23 World Championships silver medalist Dorian Coninx, both of France.

Visit wts.triathlon.org for a complete men’s start list.

ITU World Triathlon Bermuda is the second of nine stops on the circuit this year, including September’s ITU World Triathlon Grand Final in Gold Coast, Australia.

One Year Later: Mental Rehab After a Major Sports Injury

Kate Agathon – pre-injury

From Engearment.com
By Kate Agathon

NOTE: One year ago this week, Kate tore her ACL while skiing. In this narrative, she shares her struggles with psychological recovery after experiencing a major sports injury.

Outdoor recreation enthusiasts are a superstitious bunch. There are certain things that go unsaid. For example, cyclists do not openly proclaim how long it has been since they’ve experienced a mechanical, hikers do not take photos until after the summit has been reached, and skiers do not ever say “Last run of the day.”

post-injury

That’s where I made my mistake. I did the taboo. I did what skiers are never supposed to do- I said those cursed words out loud. Twenty minutes later, I was face planting in the snow, spread out in the Super Man position and didn’t want to get up. I knew my knee would not support me.

I had felt that feeling once before- two years prior, in fact, when an inexperienced teenaged snowboarder lost control and slammed into me at Keystone. Ironically, that too had been the last run of the day. On that day long ago, I had enough adrenaline rushing through me that I was able to ski down the mountain, but it was soon followed by excruciating pain by the time we reached the parking lot. An MRI scan revealed later that I had torn my left medial collateral ligament (MCL).

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