NBC SPORTS NETWORK TO AIR “40 YEARS OF DREAMS” BROADCAST SPECIAL ON FRIDAY, JUNE 29 CELEBRATING IRONMAN’S 40TH ANNIVERSARY

– 40 years of inspirational and aspirational IRONMAN athletes, stories and iconic moments showcase how a single event has grown into a global phenomenon –

New hour long special, IRONMAN “40 Years of Dreams” will premiere this Friday, June 29, at 2:00 p.m. ET on NBC Sports Network

TAMPA, Fla. (June 28, 2018) – In continuation of the celebration of IRONMAN’s 40th anniversary, a new broadcast special IRONMAN® “40 Years of Dreams” will premiere this Friday, June 29, at 2:00 p.m. ET on NBC Sports Network. This broadcast special highlights the remarkable stories of the awe-inspiring athletes and unforgettable moments that have grown the iconic triathlon brand into a global phenomenon since its very first triathlon event, which took place in Oahu, Hawai`i in 1978.

“There are so many amazing athletes and moments that have embodied the spirit of IRONMAN and captured the imagination of our community over the past 40 years,” said Christopher Stadler, Chief Marketing Officer for IRONMAN. “This broadcast special celebrates everything that athletes and fans around the world have come to love about IRONMAN.”

The 60-minute show highlights some of the most memorable moments and personalities that have left their mark on IRONMAN since its inception in 1978. Interviews include, Paula Newby-Fraser, Erin Baker, Dave Scott, Mark Allen, Chrissie Wellington, Mirinda Carfrae, Jan Frodeno and Greg Welch as well as Hines Ward, Sean Astin, Alex Zanardi, Al Trautwig, and Mike Reilly among others.

Click on the following link for a preview the broadcast: https://youtu.be/JNVUYieMguk.

Since 1978, IRONMAN has showcased not only the limitless physical capability and competitive nature of the top-endurance athletes around the world, but also some of the most inspirational and impactful stories of courage and resilience from the age-group athletes and everyday individuals competing alongside them. The fortitude of these individuals has helped create a community that believes ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE. Four decades later, hundreds of thousands of athletes have fulfilled their dreams at finish lines all over the world.

Viewers should check local listings for broadcast information in their areas. To follow the IRONMAN “40 Years of Dreams” celebration all year long, visit www.ironman.com/40years.

For more information on the IRONMAN brand and global event series, visit www.ironman.com. Media-related inquiries should be directed to press@ironman.com.


About IRONMAN
A Wanda Sports Holdings company, IRONMAN operates a global portfolio of events that includes the IRONMAN® Triathlon Series, the IRONMAN®70.3® Triathlon Series, 5150™ Triathlon Series, the Rock n’ Roll Marathon Series®, Iron Girl®, IRONKIDS®, International Triathlon Union World Triathlon Series races, road cycling events including the UCI Velothon® Series, mountain bike races including the Absa Cape Epic®, premier marathons including the Standard Chartered Singapore Marathon, and other multisport races. IRONMAN’s events, together with all other Wanda Sports Holdings events, provide more than a million participants annually the benefits of endurance sports through the company’s vast offerings. The iconic IRONMAN® Series of events is the largest participation sports platform in the world. Since the inception of the IRONMAN® brand in 1978, athletes have proven that ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE® by crossing finish lines at the world’s most challenging endurance races. Beginning as a single race, IRONMAN has grown to become a global sensation with more than 230 events across 53 countries. For more information, visit www.ironman.com.

About Wanda Sports Holdings
Wanda Sports Holdings is the world’s leading sports business entity, founded to capture the opportunities in the global sports industry and to contribute to the prosperous international sports landscape – in three key areas: 1) Spectator Sports (media and marketing business), 2) Participation Sports (active lifestyle business), 3) Services (digital, production and service business). Wanda Sports Holding incorporates the international sports marketing company Infront Sports & Media, the iconic endurance brand IRONMAN, and Wanda Sports China. The headquarters are in Guangzhou, China.

MEDIA CONTACT
Dan Berglund
Director, Communications​
dan.berglund@ironman.com

Colby Gorniewicz
Manager, Communications
colby.gorniewicz@ironman.com

Ryan Lobato
Coordinator, Communications​
ryan.lobato@ironman.com

Teyva Sammet
Coordinator, Communications​
teyva.sammet@ironman.com

Behind the Lens at IRONMAN Boulder

By Khem Suthiwan

As a four-time IRONMAN finisher, I’ve really enjoyed being on the other side of the proverbial “fence.” Not only does it give you a way to experience the race without all the training, but the change in perspective gives you a true appreciation of all the moving parts that makes race day happen.

Being behind the lens and capturing so many special moments, you realize there are stories with each grimace, smile, sigh, and hug. One by one as they crossed the finish line, I couldn’t help think about how they’ve been through hell and back…and not just on race day. But every day since the submit button on the registration form was pushed. Because of this I feel some level of responsibility in capturing as many moments as I can, and because of this I thought it would be a good idea to put these thoughts to paper (well, the internet in this case) and share with you all some things I’ve learned and experienced as an amateur race photographer. So here are a few considerations, including some that I’ve shared with the athletes I coach, for the next time you race, spectate, or volunteer at an event.

This guy clearly didn’t get the memo regarding finish line smiles
See! This guy knows how to smile!

Smile. Especially if a camera is pointed at you. You’ll soon forget about all the pain, even if it’s for a quick moment. Otherwise, you’ll have this not so pleasant look in all your race photos and someone will probably hijack it and incorporate it in a meme, or ship you some Metamucil for Christmas. You don’t want that, do you?

Finish Line Catchers. If you’re waiting for your person at the finish line, give them a few moments alone in the spotlight to celebrate their accomplishment before rushing in to hug them. They’ve earned it. Plus, your backside will be forever etched in your friend’s finish line photo, ruining a perfect moment they spent the last 6-8 months training for. Don’t be a dream killer. There were a few times I just gave up and couldn’t take any photos because there were so many people congregating with an athlete. More is not always better in this situation. A volunteer actually heard an athlete tell their friend who was hugging her while jumping up and down, “I’m going to throw up on you if you don’t get off me.” So there’s that potential biological hazard to worry about too.

Sprinting to the Finish Line. Athletes, before you get to the finish line, look in front and behind you. Allow the person in front to have their 5 seconds of fame. Don’t go sprinting to the finish (which means you had way too much gas left in the tank, but that’s a different discussion). You’ll end up ruining finish line photos of two people. Your fellow athlete and YOURS! In this case, photo-bombing is not cool, so don’t do it. Unless you’re okay with being THAT guy…or in my case, that girl from Japan who sprinted past me in the finish line chute in Kona only to hear Mike Reilly call my name first, and then hers as an afterthought because she couldn’t wait. She will be forever known as THAT girl. Choose wisely folks.

This guy, partied a little too much at the finish line. Last call was 2 hours ago. Nice photo bomb buddy.  #FacePalm (pictured here – Meredith Botnick)

Celebrate and Get Out of the Way! If there’s another athlete finishing behind you, be courteous and do your end-zone touchdown dance and clear out. The person behind you should also have the opportunity to celebrate their finish…WITHOUT you in their picture. A set of triplets crossed the finish line at IRONMAN Boulder and spent what seemed like an eternity dancing around the finish line arch. A friend of mine along with several other athletes, were completely robbed of their finish line moment because of these three guys. She was only planning on racing one IRONMAN, so there’s no redo. Thanks guys, thanks a lot.

Distractions. There is nothing more fun at a race than seeing so many friends out racing and spectating. However, there is a time and place for catching up. Working media at a race is an entirely different beast. Not only are we tracking our own friends, but we are also keeping tabs on professional and notable athletes. Time is of essence and we are constantly looking at our watches and athlete trackers. Figuring out where to be and what part of the course. Sometimes we have a short window to use the restroom or grab a quick bite. If we seem distracted and not paying attention to you, it’s not because we don’t care. We have a job to do and don’t want to miss out on capturing special race moments. At IRONMAN Boulder, each Colorado-based athlete had a 303 sticker on their race bib (we hope to continue this tradition). Our mission was to take as many photos of these athletes along with many others. Being ready to point and shoot while two people are chattering in each ear takes sensory overload to a different level.

This is what happens when you leave the Garmin alone. An awesome finish line photo! (pictured here – Justin Maples)

Look Up and Leave the Garmin ALONE! No one on Strava is going to care that your Garmin went over by 20 seconds. Your official finish time will be based on your timing chip, not your GPS tracking device. And if you are wearing a cap or visor, look up. We can’t see your pretty/handsome face if you are looking down at the ground. There’s nothing there but red carpet, concrete, and puddles of puke from the last person whose friend wouldn’t stop jumping up and down and hugging him. Eyes up folks!

Even with all these tips, sometimes the best photos are those capturing the human spirit. You might think you look awful, but someone else might be inspired by that image. Try to look beyond the ratty hair, salt stained clothing, and sunburnt limbs. Because behind that crusty and rough exterior is an awesome story of how that person woke up one day and decided they were going to be an IRONMAN.

You have one shot at an epic finish line photo. Aaron Pendergraft obviously has a lot of practice perfecting this valuable skill. Way to go Aaron!!!

Khem Suthiwan is a 4-time IRONMAN finisher (Canada, Lake Tahoe, Arizona, and Kona), triathlon coach with Mile High Multisport, IRONMAN Foundation Ambassador Athlete, and staff content editor/media correspondent with 303 Endurance Network. In addition to triathlon, she also races for the Palmares Racing cycling team in road and cyclocross. She’s an avid skier, SCUBA dives, and as a Colorado resident since January 2001 – enjoys all things Colorado. On December 31, 2017, she reached Everest Base Camp (elev. 17,600′, 5,380m) after trekking for 8 days in Nepal. If she’s not racing, you can find her out on the course supporting her friends.

IRONMAN Boulder and IRONMAN Boulder 70.3 Is Here to Stay Through 2020

Having IRONMAN Boulder withdrawals? Well, we have good news to share! Clear out and make room in your race calendar for the next couple of years!

IRONMAN BOULDER AND IRONMAN 70.3 BOULDER EXTENDED THROUGH 2020

Boulder to continue to host exceptional race experience for an additional two years

TAMPA, Fla./BOULDER, Colo. (June 6, 2018) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, in partnership with the City of Boulder and the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau, have agreed to extend their partnership with the continuation of the IRONMAN® Boulder and IRONMAN 70.3® Boulder triathlons through 2020.

“Boulder is a city that provides a tremendous amount of support to the triathlon community while embracing the IRONMAN spirit,” said Tim Brosious, Race Director for IRONMAN Boulder. “We are thrilled to continue our partnership through 2020 and grow the rich culture that the sport has instilled in Boulder. We are looking forward to this weekend’s race as we continue IRONMAN events in this area.”

Located at the foot of the Flatiron Mountains, Boulder provides a central vacationing and training location for triathletes. The city’s health-conscious culture, refreshing weather and picturesque Colorado mountain views provide a sensational venue for athletes and spectators.

“We have been a proud sponsor of IRONMAN Boulder for five years,” said Tom McGann, Chair of the Board of Directors of the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Our working relationship with IRONMAN and the City of Boulder have only strengthened and grown during this time, and we are happy to announce the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau has committed to continuing our sponsorship of this event for 2019-2020”.

The 2018 IRONMAN Boulder will take place on June 10, 2018, while the IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder will be held on August 4, 2018. Over 4,000 athletes are registered for the 2018 events and approximately 20,000 spectators are expected to attend the races. A dedicated team of over 2,500 volunteers helps to make the event successful. The IRONMAN Foundation will distribute $60,000 in charitable giveback to non-profit initiatives and groups in the Boulder region in 2018.

“The City of Boulder is excited to continue to host both IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events over the coming years,” added Michael Eubank, Special Events Manager from the City of Boulder. “We look forward to what’s in store with this established partnership that brings race participants and our community together.”

Since first debuting in 2014, IRONMAN Boulder has become a staple in the IRONMAN race circuit. The race begins with a one-loop, 2.4-mile swim in the Boulder Reservoir, followed by a multi-loop, 112-mile bike course contained within Boulder County, featuring several pronounced climbs. Athletes then embark on a 26.2-mile marathon run from the Boulder Reservoir through residential neighborhoods to downtown Boulder and onto the Boulder Creek Trail, winding along the creek and through city parks. The finish line is on Pearl Street located in the heart of downtown Boulder.

IRONMAN 70.3 Boulder also provides athletes with a scenic and challenging course. Participants begin their journey with a 1.2-mile swim in the Boulder Reservoir, followed by a fast and flowing 56-mile single loop bike course through north Boulder County. The two-loop, 13.1-mile run course begins and ends at the Boulder Reservoir.

For more information, please visit www.ironman.com/boulder for the IRONMAN event and www.ironman.com/boulder 70.3 for the IRONMAN 70.3 event. Athlete inquiries may be directed to boulder@ironman.com and boulder70.3@ironman.com. For media inquiries, please email press@ironman.com.

Bolder Boulder celebrates 40 years of city’s iconic race

40 Years Bold,” a new book produced by the Daily Camera and the Bolder Boulder, celebrates 40 years of Boulder’s iconic 10K race.

From the Daily Camera

The cover of the new book about the history of the Bolder Boulder, “40 Years Bold,” captures well the spirit of this iconic 10K road race that will weave its way through the streets of Boulder for the 40th time on Memorial Day.

Daily Camera photographer Jeremy Papasso’s picture shows the packed start of the A wave of the 2014 Bolder Boulder.

Sprinting off the line, smiles on their faces, are some young, high school runners, caught in midstride. In the lead is a fitlooking runner in a Batman costume. Another costumed runner is to his left, while just behind them is a female A wave runner. Over on the left side of the start is a masters runner.

Behind them, filling the cover, is a mass of densely packed runners of varying shapes and sizes. Here we see the competitiveness and size of the Bolder Boulder — surely no other race has as many fast runners in front.

Behind these fast runners, as the book shows, come some of the tens of thousands of other runners and walkers, friends and family, who follow the A wavers into the Folsom Field finish. These are some of the ingredients that make the Bolder Boulder an integral part of Boulder, a rite of spring that many of us run, walk, volunteer at or simply watch.

Then there is the book title: “40 Years Bold.” Appropriate, for the Bolder Boulder has long been bold and innovative in making changes and setting the tone for the Running Boom, which was in its infancy in that first Bolder back in 1979.

Read the full story

BRAVER BOLDER STRONGER. Triathlon workshops designed by women for women.

Join 303Triathlon‘s Bill Plock with Rachel Joyce and Dana Platin via Facebook Live from TriBella on Thursday, May 10th at 10:45am (MDT).

PRESS RELEASE – MAY 7, 2018
BRAVER BOLDER STRONGER. Triathlon workshops designed by women for women.

Boulder, Colorado USA: Rachel Joyce, professional triathlete; 2017 IRONMAN Boulder Champion, and Dana Platin, leadership coach and founder of The Warmi Project, are collaborating on an innovative local workshop series. Each workshop offers a unique blend of practical triathlon skills and mental tools designed to have an immediate benefit on performance. The series will take place at the University of Colorado, Boulder Recreation Center and single workshop registration is available:

Swim Braver Workshop: Sunday May 20 10:00am-3:00pm
Bike Bolder Workshop: Sunday June 3 10:00am-3:00pm
Run Stronger Workshop: Sunday June 24 10:00am-3:00pm

The Swim Braver session will develop the ability to squash the inner critic and lead with a BRAVER self-mentor both on and off the race course. The Bike Bolder session will progress the courage needed to push the comfort zone in order to fear less, take calculated risks, and move BOLDER through life. The Run Stronger session will explore the top three strategies to crush
goals to run STRONGER in life.

“Since transitioning from the corporate world to professional triathlon in 2005, I have learned a huge amount about swimming, biking and running,” said Rachel Joyce. “I understand how the development of everyday skills are essential to truly showcase fitness in the triathlon arena. I am excited to share my experiences through the Braver Bolder Stronger workshops and to be partnering with Dana Platin. Dana’s depth of knowledge and women’s leadership portfolio emphasizes the relevance of mental tools, which is often the missing piece of the jigsaw.”

“Human Interest Group is proud to support this engaging workshop series,” said Heather Nocickis, “Rachel and Dana have created a relevant, effective content program based on their respective paths to success. The result of their vision for women’s leadership is a blueprint that builds confidence and drives change, empowering others to break through barriers – in sport or in the corporate arena.”

“As a passionate, avid athlete, I use my participation in triathlons, cycling, and mountaineering as a way to set personal goals that push my limits beyond what I thought was possible,” says Dana Platin. “Personal triumphs and setbacks have taught me about gratitude, grit, and grace. My 20-years in leadership development, training, and program management are lessons learned for other women aspiring to crush their fear to accomplish their goals. I am thrilled to
partner with Rachel Joyce on this powerful experience that uses the journey of triathlon to tap into that braver, bolder, stronger version of ourselves.”

Each workshop will kick off with a challenging physical component. The swim/bike/run training sessions will be coached by Rachel, instructing on technique and key skills specific to triathlon, such as open water sighting and adapting swim strokes for different conditions; climbing and descending proficiency on the bike; and, finishing with a strong run in the final leg of a triathlon.

This will be followed by lunch and refreshments. Dana will advance discussion during the afternoon sessions, further examining potential barriers to empowerment and those tools and choices that contribute to success and define what braver, bolder, stronger means for women’s leadership and participation.

About Braver Bolder Stronger: Braver Bolder Stronger Workshops is a partnership between Rachel Joyce, Dana Platin and The Human Interest Group. For more details and event registration, click HERE.

Media Enquiries: The Human Interest Group
Heather Novickis email: heather@humaninterestgroup.org
Phone: 303.517.0624

Parking for Workshops
The workshops will take place at CU Student Recreation Center, located at 1855 Pleasant Street in Boulder, CO. We recommend parking at Lot 169 (free parking on weekends) or the Folsom Field Parking Garage (paid parking) as shown here.

Women for Tri Provides 450 Additional slots for 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships

400 Top performing female athletes based on 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Age Group Rankings and 50 top performing female athletes from Standard Bank IRONMAN 70.3 Durban provided with additional bonus qualification spots
TAMPA, Fla. (May 7, 2018) – Women For Tri®, a program of the IRONMAN Foundation®, today announced that a total of 450 additional women have earned an invitation to race in the 2018 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship taking place in Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa on September 1 and 2, 2018. After previously announcing 50 additional slots allocated to the Standard Bank IRONMAN 70.3 Durban race for top finishing female athletes, Women For Tri is providing 400 additional slots for top-ranked female athletes based on their total 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 Age Group Ranking (AGR) points. The additional slots will be utilized by Women For Tri, a program launched by IRONMAN to welcome and empower new female triathletes to be a part of the sport’s continued growth in high-level competition.

“We are excited to welcome top age-group athletes from around the world to this year’s IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in South Africa,” said Kyrsten Sinema, Chair of the Women For Tri Advisory Committee and U.S. Representative from Arizona. “Following in the footsteps of the women who raced in support of Women For Tri last year in Chattanooga, we hope the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship inspires women around the world to reimagine their potential as triathletes.”

Allocating these 400 additional slots based on IRONMAN 70.3 AGR will create a deeper field of female athletes and maintain the integrity and prestige of an IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship event. The AGR system measures an athlete’s performance in IRONMAN 70.3 races throughout the 2018 qualifying year.

All net proceeds from the registration revenue of the 400 additional slots will go towards supporting Women For Tri’s TriClub grant program. To date, nearly $250,000 has been awarded by this program to TriClubs around the world to support women’s engagement initiatives, including bringing first-timers into the sport. Since its inception in 2015, Women For Tri has seen an 18% increase in female participation in IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 events, totaling more than 66,000 female athletes globally.

The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is the pinnacle event in the global IRONMAN 70.3 series. The 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship race will be a two-day event with the professional and age group women racing on Saturday, September 1 and the professional and age-group men racing on Sunday, September 2. Nearly 5,000 athletes will qualify to race in the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship from among over 100 IRONMAN 70.3 races around the world throughout the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 qualifying season.

For questions about Women For Tri programming, please contact womenfortri@ironman.com. For media related inquiries, please contact press@ironman.com.

Passing the Torch: Educating the Next Generation of the Outdoor Industry

From Elevation Outdoors
By Harper Brown

The outdoor industry is booming, there’s no doubt about it. According to the Outdoor Industry Association, the outdoor recreation economy recorded $887 billion in consumer spending in 2016, a whopping figure that accounted for two percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product that same year. The industry as a whole generates roughly 7.6 million direct jobs in the U.S., and that number is on the rise — up from 6.1 million direct jobs logged in 2012. The outdoor industry is in the midst of a massive growth spurt, and that growth is spawning an industry-wide search for the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts, stewards of the land, champions of nature and sustainably-minded conservationist willing to grab the torch and carry on the business of inspiring responsible recreation in the great outdoors. And that search has officially landed on college campuses throughout the country.

On day two of the 2018 Outdoor Retailer + Snow Show in Denver, Colorado, the Outdoor Industry Association presented “The Next Wave of Outdoorist: The Importance of Growing Outdoor Communities on College Campuses” to an attentive crowd in the Colorado Convention Center. The panel included Dr. Carine Feyten (Texas Woman’s University), Alondra Martinez (Texas Woman’s University student), Scott Wyatt (president of Southern Utah University), Abigail Wyatt (Southern Utah University student) and Ian Levin (Senior Deputy Director for the Outdoor Foundation) as the moderator. The panel discussion highlighted the importance of college campuses promoting students to spend time outside; ultimately encouraging better performance, a closer college community, and more college students pursing careers in the outdoor industry.

Read the full article

Blind runners form a tight community

DENVER, CO – APRIL 22: Blind runner Amelia Dickerson, right, gets congratulated by her friend and guide Grace Dill, left, after finishing the 5 mile race of the 36th annual Cherry Creek Sneak road race on April 22, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. The race, which heralds spring in Colorado, includes a 10 mile race, a 5 mile run/walk, a 5K race and a kids 1/2 mile fun run. Thousands of people turned out for the annual event as the temperatures were cool but the skies were sunny making for a perfect race day. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

From the Denver Post

By Danika Worthington

About 15 participants enjoy the social nature of race

Members of the tight-knit group pumped up one another at the starting line.

Shoes were retied last minute as the national anthem played from the speakers. When it finished, the announcer asked blind and visually impaired runners to come forward.

The group made their way up. Crosby, a guide dog for runner Kerry Kuck, stood at the front of the pack. The runners prepared for their starting cue, which was a minute before the rest of the participants tackled the 5-mile route at the annual Cherry Creek Sneak.

“Crosby the dog is going to lead the way,” the announcer barked out to the crowd. Then, the start was signaled. The runners and their guides took off, breaking away down the first stretch.

The Colorado Springs based U.S. Association of Blind Athletes partnered with Achilles Denver, the local chapter of an international organization that gives athletes with disabilities a community of support, and Lending Sight, a Colorado sports club that connects those with good vision with blind or visually impaired runners, to recruit about 15 runners and guides to race Sunday.

For some, the sport is about escaping isolation or exploring freedom. For others, it is a fun form of exercise. Regardless of the motivation, the athletes all expressed a similar theme: Blind runners have a tight community in Denver.

Read the full story

USA Triathlon Collegiate Club and High School National Championships

By Rich Soares
303Triathlon.com

USAT COLLEGIATE CLUB AND HIGH SCHOOL NATIONALS
TUSCALOOSA, AL
APRIL 27-28, 2018

Go to any high school or collegiate contest and you notice the unmistakable energy of youthful athletes and fans. School chants, fight songs and air horns fill the air, while flags, mascots and costumes create a visually vivid landscape. This weekend’s USA Triathlon Collegiate Club and High School Nationals delivered an experience that was exponentially more electric than your typical collegiate competition. A rolling sea of team tents covered 1100 athletes from 109 colleges. Schools from coast to coast brought their school spirit, competitiveness and the best demonstrations of sportsmanship at what is arguably the highest level of competition for High School and Collegiate triathletes.

While they competed fiercely for individual and team standings, athletes gave each other high-fives and hugs at the start and finish lines. They encouraged each other on the course and celebrated in the post-race ice bath pools. For all the competitive grit, sprint finishes, and gut-wrenching efforts, the culture of triathlon was evidenced in encouragement on the course and concern at the medical tent.

Due to heavy rainfall in Tuscaloosa the past two weeks, the Holt Dam spillway gates were opened by local officials to avoid flooding. Heightened volume in the Black Warrior River necessitated that the gates remain open through race weekend, resulting in overly strong currents that were deemed unsafe for swimming. USAT officials announced a course change mid-week. All races will be shifted from a triathlon (swim-bike-run) to a duathlon (run-bike-run) to ensure athlete safety.

Colorado teams had a great showing. At the Olympic distance, CU’s Men’s and Women’s teams came in second to the Naval Academy and UC Berkeley respectively. CSU Women placed 5th and Men 9th. USAFA Women came in 11th and Men’s 12th. Colorado School of Mines Women came in 47th and Men 55th. Combined scores put CU in 2nd, CSU in 7th, USAFA 9th and CSM in 49th.

CU Buffs Roy Madrid and Timothy Winslow finished 2nd and 3rd behind the University of California’s Sean Harrington, who took the Men’s race with a 1:33:58. The Women’s champion was Stephanie Murphy of US Naval Academy and CSU’s Katrina Lems was Colorado’s first Woman in 8th place. In the High School contest, Austin Podhajsky and Jack Deweerdt from Parker, Colorado took 2nd and 3rd respectively behind the Male winner Drew Shellenberger. Cassidy Hickey of Parker, Colorado took 2nd behind the Female winner Gillian Cridge.

 

Hayden Cog Run looms as running and biking race season approaches

From The Steamboat Pilot & Today

by Joel Reichenberger

Matt Milde runs down the Cog road near Hayden during last year’s Hayden Cog Run. The grueling early-season running race is back this year, one of the first events of the running and biking season.

Skiing and snowboarding season has already given way to running and cycling season for many local athletes who started airing up their tires and lacing up their sneakers before the lifts stopped turning. The competitive season for those athletes is coming up quickly, as well.

The first event of the Steamboat Springs Running Series is less than two weeks away, and an important deadline is even closer than that.

The Hayden Cog Run will celebrate its 40th anniversary on May 5 with a grueling early-season test, 8.4-miles up the Cog road in Hayden.

Signing up for the race in years past has usually included a race t-shirt, and it does again this year, but years of leftover boxes of shirts have encouraged organizers to set Wednesday as a deadline for signing up online and getting a shirt.

Read the full article