Local Professional, Cam Dye, Announces Retirement

THE END OF A DREAM CAREER

I was 15-years-old when I entered my first race.

On that day the swim was in a pool, so it felt fitting when I ended my career with a pool-swim at Major League Triathlon in Charlotte on October 6, 2018. For a long time, I’ve made a living by pushing the pace and playing to my strengths.

Now, at the age of 34, I walk away satisfied with how I went about my business: honest, dedicated, and collegial.

We all know that it takes a particular personality to put your whole life into sports; it’s usually the kind of competitor who gets mad when they lose at Candyland. Guilty as charged. As a racer, my goal was always to see if my best was better than your best. Some days it was, other days it wasn’t. On the days that it wasn’t, I am proud to say that I raced against some of the greatest to ever toe the line.

Here’s to you Alistair and Javier, Crowie and Macca. And then there was Greg Bennett who had an uncanny ability to show up on the biggest stages and knock it out of the park.

You all were an inspiration to me. 

Original and complete post here

Monday Masters: Swimming May Slow Down Aging By Decades

by Diane Sewell, Everything Zoomer

 

From cradle to grave, swimming might just be the best exercise ever. Here, eight health benefits of taking a lap or two. 

Swimming is good for just about everyone. It accommodates all ages, stages, abilities and disabilities.

There’s also evidence it can slow down the aging process.

A long-term study at Indiana University Bloomington’s Counsilman Center for the Science of Swimming found that Masters Swimmers (over age 35) who swam roughly 3,200 to 4,500 metres (about 3.2 to 4.8 kilometres) three to five times a week, postponed the aging process. And not just for a few years but for decades, according to traditional age markers like muscle mass blood pressure and lung function.

But you don’t have to be a Masters Swimmer to benefit from swimming. Far from it.

“The health and well-being benefits start with a minimal amount of swimming,” Counsilman Centre Director Joel Stager is quoted as saying in the university’s newsletter. “If you want the fitness effect, you’ll need to look at getting your heart rate up and boosting the intensity.”

Another study, by Dr. Steven Blair at the University of South Carolina, has shown swimming dramatically reduces the risk of dying. The study spanned 32 years and followed 40,000 men, aged 20 to 90. Those who swam had a 50 per cent lower death rate than runners, walkers and those who didn’t exercise at all.

Here are some other known benefits to swimming:

1. It’s kind to your joints and improves flexibility.

 

Original article here

XTERRA 2018 World Championships, What a Day

October 28, 2018 (Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii) – Rom Akerson from Costa Rica and Lesley Paterson from Scotland captured the 23rd annual XTERRA World Championship off-road triathlon elite titles on a sunny but muddy day in Kapalua, Maui.

It’s the first XTERRA World title for Akerson and the third for Paterson, who last won in 2011 and 2012. Both earned $20,000 for their respective victories, their share of the $100,000 elite purse.

 

More than 700 endurance athletes from 44 countries and 39 U.S. states competed in the event, which started with a one-mile rough water swim at D.T. Fleming Beach, continued with a muddy 18.5-mile mountain bike ride that traversed the West Maui Mountains, and finished with a 6.5-mile trail run through forest trails and beach sand.

There was more than 4,000 feet of combined climbing on the technical bike and run courses, which were muddy and slippery due to recent rainstorms on Maui’s northwest coast.

 

On a very difficult and muddy course Colorado athletes made a great showing.

Josiah Middaugh of Vail, rounded out the Pro Men’s race with a 5th place finish and the only American in the top 10.

In the Pro Women’s race, Americans Suzie Snyder, Julie Baker and Allison Baca, of Boulder, all finished in the top 10.

Deanna McCurdy of Littleton and Sharon McDowell-Larsen or Colorado Springs topped the podium in their Age Groups.

 

Full Recap and results here

Introducing Birota Foods

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Introducing Birota Foods
Littleton, Colorado, October 16, 2018

On a cold, Colorado winter day in 2016, Bob Seebohar, 2008 Olympic Sport Dietitian, was out riding his bike, chilled to the bone. All he could think about was how to get warm. Growing up a hot chocolate lover, he immediately began fantasizing about a nice hot cup of chocolatey goodness. Unfortunately, he had a problem: he didn’t want all the sugar that accompanied one of his favorite childhood beverages so he thought of ideas to make this wonderful drink more healthy and functional. Once he made it back home, he tore up his kitchen, experimenting with different creations until his taste buds approved of one particular recipe. This was the birth of Birota Foods. The word “birota” means bicycle in Latin. Birota Foods was born on a bike.

Enter Bri Greenlee, an accomplished Registered/Sport Dietitian, food scientist and chef. Bob met Bri in 2016 and was so impressed by her passion for nutrition and her amazing culinary knowledge and forward thinking, that he pitched his cocoa idea to her. This was the beginning of a very exciting journey.

The mission of Birota Foods is to redefine the cocoa and creamer markets by providing functional ingredients that improve health and fitness by reducing inflammation, improving the body’s ability to burn fat, and regenerating long lasting energy without causing blood sugar spikes.

Birota Foods officially launched their first two products, Smart Cocoa and Smart Coconut Creamer, in September, 2018. Each product contains a few simple ingredients that have been hand picked by Bob and Bri because of their functional roles they have in the body. Take, for example, the two different types of cocoa used in Smart Cocoa. This combination of cocoa has almost double the fat and very high antioxidant levels compared to most, traditional cocoa products on the market. Then there is the addition of organic coconut milk powder for a powerful source of medium chain triglycerides (MCT’s) along with the extra addition of caprylic acid, another MCT, which raises ketone levels, allowing the body to burn more fat and improve cognitive functioning. D-ribose is another powerful, functional ingredient in both products which regenerates energy (aka-ATP) without increasing blood sugar. Birota Foods is redefining the cocoa and creamer markets one ingredient at a time.

Birota Foods is a company that uses high-quality, functional ingredients in food products to help improve health and fitness markers.
###
For more information about Birota Foods, please contact Bob Seebohar at bob@birotafoods.com or visit www.birotafoods.com.

Kona 2018 Running Shoe Count: Hoka Reigns Again

From Triathlete.com

 

A look at the running shoes the world’s best triathletes are wearing.

Running shoe industry expert David Jewell of Runningshoeinsight.com stood out on the Ironman World Championship run course for the eighth year in a row to collect data on which running shoes the world’s best triathletes are wearing. For the first time ever, he counted the shoes during the final, more-spread-out mile of the marathon instead of the first to ensure a higher level of accuracy. After dethroning Asics in 2017, Hoka One One once again prevailed as the most-worn brand—capturing the feet of 17.7% of the athletes. A big mover was Nike in second place, going from 5.7% in 2017 to 14.9% in 2018.

 

Read the full article here

 

 

A Record-Breaking IRONMAN World Championship – On Course & Online

by Andrew Messick, CEO at IRONMAN

 

We had a great week, a triumph, a day and race for the ages. Simply put, it was marvelous.

 

Madame Pele blessed us with perhaps the best weather in our championship history; our athletes took advantage of her gift. Records were smashed in all aspects of the race and we saw the oldest finisher in our history – Hiromu Inada from Japan, 86 years old.

 

 

After celebrating 40 Years of Dreams, Saturday’s race was seen by more people than any edition in history, and in more places. That’s not easy when you’re broadcasting from an island, in new formats. Our partnerships with Facebook Watch, NBC Sports, ASO and BCC redefined broadcast excellence in our sport and gave us an unrivaled platform for our brand.

“This year we grew our live online viewership from 1.2 Million views in 2017, to 20 Million views in 2018 on Facebook Watch. That’s 16x!”

 

Click Here for Full Article

 

Athletes Baker and Molina, Contributors Baggs and Campbell Inducted into IRONMAN Hall of Fame at IRONMAN ALOHA Reception

KAILUA-KONA, Hawai`i / TAMPA, Fla. (Oct. 11, 2018) – Last evening saw legendary IRONMAN® athletes Erin Baker and Scott Molina along with IRONMAN contributors Ken Baggs and Rocky Campbell officially enshrined into the IRONMAN Hall of Fame. The Aloha Reception took place on the hallowed grounds of Hulihe’e Palace overlooking Kailua Bay. This year’s class joins an elite list of key figures and athletes in IRONMAN history.

“As we celebrate 40 years of IRONMAN, we have the opportunity to induct into the IRONMAN Hall of Fame athletes and contributors who have been instrumental to the evolution of this race,” said Andrew Messick, President and Chief Executive Officer of IRONMAN in front of a packed house.

Erin Baker is a two-time IRONMAN World Champion having won in 1987 and 1990 and took first in 104 of the 121 races she entered. In her career, Baker was impressive at every level, earning titles at the ITU World Championship, ITU Duathlon World Championship and IRONMAN World Championship. The New Zealander has been a champion of the sport and continues to be known as one of the best female triathletes of all time.

“Triathlon gave me such a great platform for the rest of my life,” said Baker in her induction speech. “It’s given me so many opportunities that a kid like me from a very normal place, in a little country, would not have otherwise had.”

Scott Molina was a member of the famed “Big Four” consisting of fellow athletes Dave Scott, Mark Allen and Scott Tinley, who dominated the racing through the 1980s and into the 1990s. Molina won the 1988 IRONMAN World Championship and won the inaugural IRONMAN New Zealand in 1985, which was the first IRONMAN event to be held outside of Hawai`i.

“The sport has been wonderful to me,” said Molina. “I never dreamed the first time I came here in 1981 that my life would be changed. Joining the names on the Hall of Fame list is a huge privilege.”

Ken Baggs was instrumental in the creation of IRONMAN in Australia, working in the region for 30 years (1984-2014). He was one of the original members of the organizing committee for the inaugural IRONMAN Australia race in 1985, becoming the race director in 1987. He also founded IRONMAN Western Australia and served as the race director for both races until 2012. Baggs is considered an integral part of the early team responsible for establishing rules, safety and operation procedures globally as IRONMAN was growing from a single race in Hawai`i to events worldwide.

“I am honored to be in such unbelievably legendary company,” said Baggs. “I really am so privileged.”

Rocky Campbell is one of the original and longest-tenured IRONMAN World Championship volunteers. For nearly 40 years, Campbell helped shape and showcase the importance of volunteerism to the success of IRONMAN. Serving as volunteer director for the last 33 years, Campbell first began as an aid-station volunteer before taking on roles with the swim course, construction, and action management.

In her introduction of Campbell, Diana Bertsch, Vice President of World Championships for IRONMAN said, “There’s nothing you can’t ask him that he won’t give of himself.”

“IRONMAN has been a huge part of my life for 40 years—and I thank you,” said Campbell.

Founded in 1993, the IRONMAN Hall of Fame was created to honor individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the growth of the world’s most famous endurance race series. Baker, Molina, Baggs and Campbell join a prestigious list of remarkable individuals honored for what they have given to the sport of triathlon and IRONMAN both inside and outside of competition.

IRONMAN Hall of Fame:

1993 Dave Scott
1994 Julie Moss
1995 Scott Tinley
1996 Paula Newby-Fraser
1997 Mark Allen
1998 John and Judy Collins
1999 Valerie Silk
2000 Tom Warren
2001 Dr. Bob Laird
2002 Bob Babbitt
2003 John MacLean / Gordon Haller / Lyn Lemaire
2004 Greg Welch
2005 Jim Maclaren
2008 Team Hoyt – Rick and Dick Hoyt
2011 Mike Reilly
2012 Graham Fraser
2013 Peter Henning
2014 Georg Hochegger / Helge Lorenz / Stefan Petschnig
2015 Lori Bowden / Heather Fuhr
2016 Lew Friedland / Peter Reid
2017 Chrissie Wellington
2018 Ken Baggs / Erin Baker / Rocky Campbell / Scott Molina

For more information about the IRONMAN Hall of Fame and its members, visit www.ironman.com/hof. The IRONMAN Hall of Fame video can be viewed on the IRONMAN YouTube channel located here.

SOURCE: Press release email 10/12/2018

IRONMAN Announces TAUPÕ, New Zealand as host of the 2020 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship

TAMPA, Fla. / TAUPÕ, New Zealand / Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i (Oct. 11, 2018) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, announced today that the right to host the 2020 IRONMAN® 70.3® World Championship triathlon has been awarded to Taupõ, New Zealand. This will be the first time IRONMAN® holds a world championship event in New Zealand and the second time this world-class event has been hosted in the Oceania region. The event will also move from its traditional late August-early September race date and will now take place on November 28-29, 2020 with the women racing on Saturday and the men racing on Sunday. This shift will take advantage of New Zealand’s peak time of year with mild temperatures in their late spring early summer months.

“We are pleased to bring the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship back to the Oceania region,” said Andrew Messick, CEO and President of IRONMAN. “Taupõ is unique and beautiful destination with a local community that has embraced IRONMAN events and the thousands of athletes for 20 years now. We are excited to welcome some of the world’s most elite triathletes to what will no doubt be a fantastic world championship event.”

Athletes will have the chance to qualify for the 2020 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship triathlon at over 110 global qualifying events in locations such as Austria, China, Germany, Spain, South Africa, Sweden and the Americas.

“The two-day event attracts around 5,000 competitors, 13,500 supporters and media from all four corners of the globe,” said Taupō District Mayor David Trewavas. “This is as big as it is ever going to get. We are talking the best of the best. Winning the hosting rights for this event not only re-emphasises that our district is the Events Capital, but it also further cements Taupō as being the home of all things IRONMAN in New Zealand.”


The swim portion will take place in the beautiful waters of Lake Taupõ, followed by a single-loop bike course, and a run course that will entail two loops on Lake Terrace and the Lions Walk adjacent to Lake Taupõ. Athletes will finish on Lake Terrace next to Colonel Roberts Reserve. The IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is part of a week-long festival that will include a range of lifestyle events for the community and visitors to enjoy.

Prior to the 2020 edition taking place in Taupõ, the 2019 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship is taking place on September 7 and 8, 2019 in Nice, France; it will be the first time IRONMAN holds a world championship event in France.

Complete Press Release here

 

U.S. Athletes Earn Three Golds at Sarasota-Bradenton ITU Paratriathlon World Cup

SARASOTA, Fla. — Three U.S. paratriathletes collected gold medals Sunday morning at the Sarasota-Bradenton ITU Paratriathlon World Cup, an elite race held as part of the two-day Sarasota-Bradenton Triathlon Festival at Nathan Benderson Park. U.S. athletes earned nine total medals on the day, standing out among a field of competitors from 17 countries.

The race was shifted from a triathlon (swim-bike-run) to a duathlon (run-bike-run) after heightened algae levels in the lake due to recent weather conditions forced a cancellation of the swim leg. The adjusted course featured a 2.5-kilometer run, 18.3-kilometer bike and another 5-kilometer run.

Elizabeth Baker (Signal Mountain, Tenn.) claimed the win in the women’s PTVI class, crossing the line with a time of 1 hour, 7 minutes, 12 seconds. It was a close finish with U.S. teammate Amy Dixon (Encinitas, Calif.), who took silver in 1:07:40. Completing the all-American podium was Eliza Cooper (New York, N.Y.) in 1:10:23.

“I’m proud of the race. I had nothing left,” Baker said. “Amy gave me a run for my money on that one. And it was fun having Eliza, a great newbie, in the race. It’s just really nice to see the sport growing and people getting faster, and newbies coming in in the United States.”

Kyle Coon (Carbondale, Colo.) collected his first international paratriathlon medal with a silver in the men’s PTVI division. Coon’s time of 58:47 was less than a minute behind the division winner, Yuichi Takahashi of Japan. Brad Snyder (Baltimore, Md.) was just 33 seconds off the podium for the PTVI men, finishing fourth in 1:00:28.

Adam Popp (Arlington, Va.) stormed to the win in the men’s PTS2 division with a time of 1:15:05. While Popp earned two ITU World Cup medals last season, including a bronze here in Sarasota, Sunday’s race marked his first gold. Cahin Perez (Christiana, Tenn.) also reached the podium for the PTS2 men, taking bronze with a time of 1:22:57.

“This was a good capper to the season,” Popp said. “It went well, and it was an improvement from last year. I’m happy with my first win on the ITU circuit.”

 

Complete article and full results here