Take the Guess Work Out of Bike Maintenance with Ikeono

by Khem Suthiwan

From Tribella’s very own Brett Lang and IOs developer Dru Lang, comes Ikeono , the check engine light for your bike.

As manager of the Tribella Sports Group , Brett spends his days interpreting people’s qualitative description to what is effectively a quantitative problem. In his experience, people do not willfully neglect their bike, it is simply a lack of knowledge and awareness. With this realization, Brett and his brother came up with the idea of Ikeono, the check engine light for your bike.

Ikeono takes Strava ride data and attributes mileage to each of your components, sending notifications when service might need to be completed.  The service intervals are all based on industry standards, however are fully customizable for those with a better handle on their individual needs. With flexible notification settings, you can either sit back and utilize their Automatic Component Notification System™, or take full control and create custom notification intervals.

While the initial goal was to expand knowledge regarding bike maintenance, they realized there was another void which needed to be filled.  Phase two of Ikeono will allow you to schedule bike maintenance through your local shop, track the status of your bike as it is being worked on, and know exactly when it is finished.

Current Features:
– Seamless integration with Strava to track mileage on core component groups.
– Default service intervals, and notification when components might be due for service.
– Ability to track multiple bikes and wheel sets.
– Detailed maintenance record.

Features Coming Soon:
– Ability to schedule maintenance via the app.
– Real time updates as your bike is being serviced.
– Integration with tracking platforms Garmin, TrainingPeaks, and Wahoo

As competitive triathletes and avid cyclists with busy schedules, we demand a lot from our bikes, and with Ikeono, you can rest assured that you will extend the life of your bike, prevent breakdowns, and stay at the top of your game.

Weekend Preview

Triathlon Events

Thursday July 12th

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Boulder Stroke & Stride: Week #6

Boulder


West End 3k

Boulder


Friday July 13th

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Saturday July 14th

 

BAM OWS

Boulder


Frisco Triathlon

Frisco


Pagosa Duathlon

Pagosa Springs


Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen


Sunday July 15th

 

Ironhawk Endurance Camp

Evergreen



Cycling Events

Thursday July 12th

 

Demand Film: All for One

Broomfield


USA Cycling Junior and Masters Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa


Friday July 13th

 

TriVelo Youth Mtb Camp

Grant


RMRS – Granby Ranch

Granby Ranch


USA Cycling Junior and Masters Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa


Saturday July 14th

 

Breck 100

Breckenridge


Triple ByPass

Evergreen


RMRS – Granby Ranch

Granby Ranch


Durango Dirty Century – CANCELLED

Durango


San Luis Valley Century

Alamosa


Leadville Massive – CANCELLED

Leadville


TriVelo Youth Mtb Camp

Grant


USA Cycling Junior and Masters Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa


Sunday July 15th

 

32nd Longmont Criterium

Longmont


RMRS – Granby Ranch

Granby Ranch


TriVelo Youth Mtb Camp

Grant


USA Cycling Junior and Masters Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa

We Are Triathletes Documentary to Show in Colorado

This film follows 6 triathletes from 4 countries (U.S., China, Germany, and Australia) and tells their stories of how they train and prepare for the world’s largest long distance triathlon race – the legendary CHALLENGE ROTH in Germany. The history of the early days of Ironman triathlon is also told by some of the Ironman legends.

Theater listings and tickets here

 

 

303 Beginner Tri Project – Training 201: If you Want to get Fancy

by Alison Freeman

Have you completed your first tri recently? Or maybe it’s still on the horizon … but you’re already thinking about the next one. When triathletes are thinking about their next race, it’s usually with an eye toward how they can improve upon the last one. In fact, I’m convinced that the elusive perfect race is what keeps triathletes coming back to the sport year after year.

As a newer entrant to the sport, one of the fastest ways to improve on race day is to improve your approach to training. For your first race, you may have simply focused on ensuring you were able to complete the full swim-bike-run distances. Which means that for this next race, “getting fancy” with your training regimen will surely yield improvement.

The five key workouts outlined below will build both endurance and speed, and set you up for great results come race day:

The Long, Endurance Workout

What It Is
This is your weekend long bike and long run, which build to at least 120% of race-day distance for sprint- and Olympic-distance triathlons, and is the the fundamental component of training. Don’t be fooled into thinking that you shouldn’t train at your endurance effort level because you’re going to be racing at a faster pace. The long, endurance workout is critical for building your aerobic engine, which is required regardless of race pace.

These workouts should be done at your endurance effort level – your all day, conversational pace. By conversational, I do literally mean that you can hold a conversation while running or cycling at this effort level. Often athletes run faster than their endurance pace on their endurance runs. If you can’t get out a full sentence (10+ words) without needing a break to breathe, then you’re running too fast. Don’t be discouraged if your pace feels unbearably slow at this effort level – it will increase over time with discipline and patience!

When To Use It
Every week, without fail. In fact 80% of your training each week should be done at endurance effort.

 

Hill Repeats

What They Are

Yup, these are just what they sound like: short but intense bursts of effort going up a hill, that you repeat several times.

FOR THE RUN: Start with a ten to fifteen minute endurance-effort warm up. Then hit the intervals: four to eight repeats of 30 seconds running hard up the hill, and recover by walking or jogging back to the bottom of the hill. You should just barely be able to maintain your pace for the entire 30 seconds, and for the entire set of four to eight repeats. (Yes, they should be that hard – lots of huffing and puffing involved in this one!) Finish the run with an endurance-effort cool down of five to fifteen minutes.

As you get stronger, you can lengthen the hill repeats up to 45 seconds, then a minute, 90 seconds, and even two minutes. Keep in mind that as the length of the hill increases, your sustainable pace will decrease; adjust your pace but follow the same principle that you should just barely be able to hold that pace to the top of the hill.

FOR THE BIKE: You can either find a short, relatively steep hill and repeat that four to eight times, or you can ride up a longer hill just once or twice, or you can ride a hilly route and work each and every hill you encounter. For any of those options, include a ten to fifteen minute endurance-effort warm up and cool down; ride the hills hard – as hard as you can sustain – and recover on the downhills.

When To Use Them
Hill repeats are great tools to develop strength and power early in your training, preparing you for the upcoming speed work. I recommend doing these workouts weekly, 8-12 weeks before your race.

 

Threshold Intervals

What They Are
Threshold intervals should be done at your lactate threshold, which can be thought of as the pace that just barely keeps that burn from taking over your legs before the interval concludes.

For both bike and run threshold intervals, start with a ten to fifteen minute endurance-effort warm up. Then complete three to six 3-minute threshold intervals with 3-minute very, very easy recoveries; the effort level should be very challenging but repeatable. Finish the workout with an endurance-effort cool down of five to fifteen minutes.

Each week, either increase the number of repetitions, add a minute to the interval duration, or take a minute away from the recovery duration. Unlike with increasing durations for hill repeats, as these workout gets harder, your effort level should remain the same – or even get stronger as you adjust to the demands of the workout.

When To Use Them
Threshold intervals are the best way to build speed at all effort levels. I recommend doing these workouts weekly, 4-8 weeks before your race.

 

Anaerobic Intervals

What They Are
Anaerobic intervals are executed at a similar effort level as hill repeats, but they’re about going fast versus building strength and power. Intervals at this effort level should produce a “burn” in your legs after the 3rd interval, but should be repeatable with sufficient rest.

For both bike and run anaerobic intervals, start with a ten to fifteen minute endurance-effort warm up. Then complete five to ten 30-second anaerobic intervals with 30-second very, very easy recoveries; the effort level should be extremely challenging but repeatable. Finish the workout with an endurance-effort cool down of five to fifteen minutes.

Each week, increase the total number of 30-second intervals up to twelve, or two sets of eight to ten. Alternatively, you can lengthen the intervals up to one minute, starting with four to six intervals. As with the threshold intervals, your effort level should remain the same as the workouts get harder.

When To Use Them
Anaerobic intervals serve to give a final nudge to your top speed. I recommend doing these workouts in the four weeks before your race.

 


Race Pace Tempo Intervals

What They Are
Race pace tempo intervals are singular, sustained intervals executed at your expected race pace. Your race pace is typically somewhere between your endurance effort and your lactate threshold, based on your fitness and the race distance. As you do these workouts, try to find an effort level that you can hold for the entire race duration.

For both bike and run, the single race pace intervals is bookended by an endurance effort warm up and cool down of ten to fifteen minutes. The race pace interval on the bike can range in duration from ten to thirty minutes; on the run, the duration can range from five to fifteen minutes.

Start with a duration on the lower end of the range, and increase it until two weeks before race day. After that, decrease the interval duration a bit or split it into two, shorter intervals.

When To Use Them
Race pace intervals help you identify and get accustomed to your desired race pace. I recommend doing these workouts in the four weeks before your race.

Tri Coach Tuesday: Sneaky Little Sports Drinks

by Cindy Dallow, 2 Doc Tri Coaching

 

There’s a plethora of sports drinks on the market, and you’d have to be living under a rock not to know it. But are they really necessary? Do they deliver on what they promise? And is it possible to make your own sports drink for a lot less money?

Let’s take those questions one at a time. Are sports drinks necessary? For endurance athletes, yes.

For example, after prolonged exercise (longer than 60 minutes), sports drinks can help replenish electrolytes that the body loses through sweat. The predominant electrolyte we lose when we sweat is sodium, with its anion chloride coming in a close second. Sodium and chloride regulate the amount of fluids throughout your body, which affects blood pressure, blood volume, and cellular function. Thus, sodium chloride or “salt” is the most important ingredient in a sports drink.

If you’re a “salty sweater” – that is, someone with a high sweat rate – it’s especially important that you replenish sodium during and after intense activity. Fortunately, this is fairly easy to do with food as there are many sodium-containing foods in the typical American diet. However, it’s a bit harder to replace sodium while running because it’s hard to eat real food while running.  This is where sport drinks come in handy as it’s easier to drink than eat and for events less than two hours, most athletes can get all the sodium they need from a good sports drink. For longer events, a combination of different products can be utilized to replace the sodium lost in sweat.

It’s also important to make sure the product contains sodium chloride, as chloride is essential for regulating fluid balance. Interestingly, there’s a product on the market called Nuun Active that touts itself as having the “optimal blend of electrolytes for athletic performance”, but upon closer inspection, one finds that Nuun Active contains a combination of sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate that react with citrate to form sodium citrate (instead of sodium chloride). Why is that a problem? Because the primary side effect of sodium citrate is “tetany” or intense muscle spasms. Who needs that during a race? Why not just use sodium chloride since chloride plays a major role in fluid regulation?

So, what about potassium, calcium, and magnesium? Losses of these electrolytes in sweat are negligible so they really don’t need replacing during exercise. But many sport drinks contain them anyway – probably to make you think that you need them – but adding them only drives up the cost of the product.

 

Complete article here and a recipe for your own sports drink here

 

About Coach Cindy 

Cindy came from a running background as well. After finishing her 12th marathon, she realized that she needed some cross-training. At the age of 45, she learned how to swim in a pool and then a few years later, she took the plunge into open water swimming. Fast forward 8 years and she has completed dozens of sprint, Olympic, and 70.3 races, and 4 full Ironman races.

Cindy is a Registered Dietitian with a PhD in nutrition from Colorado State University. She is also a certified USAT triathlon coach and a certified intuitive eating counselor.

Weekend Preview: Boulder Peak Triathlon

Triathlon Events

Saturday July 7th

 

LG Tri: Splash, Grind, Sprint

Eagle


Grant Ranch OWS

Littleton


Sunday July 8th

 

Boulder Peak Traithlon

Boulder


Silver Rush 50 Run

Leadville


Rocky Mountain State Games: Triathlon

Colorado Springs



Cycling Events

Thursday July 5th

 

BVV Thursday Night Racing

Erie


Saturday July 7th

 

BME Series: Keystone

Keystone


EPIC Singletrack Series: Race RendezVous

Winter Park


BVV Saturday Sprints

Erie


Laramie MTB Series

Happy Jack, Wy


USAC Masters Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa


USAC Junior Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa


Sunday July 8th

 

Sunshine Hill Climb

Boulder


Silver Rush 50 MTB Race

Leadville


USAC Masters Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa


USAC Junior Track National Championships

Trexlertown, Pa

Tri Coach Tuesday: Self-Trust and Triathlon

BY Ross Hartley, USAT Coach

The person you talk to the most is not your significant other, not your son or daughter, not your best friend or even your dog — it’s yourself. This self-talk is fueled by your thoughts which then creates your attitude, and your attitude then influences your actions.

Self-Talk, Attitude, Actions.

This is a never-ending cycle that determines how you view the world and the events around you. This self-talk reveals one’s self-trust. Self-trust is belief in one’s ability to succeed in specific situations, also known as self-confidence and self-efficacy. Self-trust is the secret ingredient that can make or break one’s performance in a variety of situations, including triathlon.

A high level of self-trust is a requirement for success in triathlon. During the conversation one has in their head during training and racing, a belief in one’s self and performance is a necessity. Self-trust can be built, maintained and strengthened through consistent and intentional repetition, otherwise known as purposeful practice. Purposeful practice of self-trust consists of five steps:

1. Begin with the end in mind.

What do you want? To become? To do? Your future first begins as a narrative that your brain tells you. What are you telling yourself? I personally use and advise my athletes to use the goals-targets-outcomes framework. Goals represent items that are completely under your control (I’m going to follow my fueling plan during my IRONMAN). Targets are items that you have a little bit less control over but are directly related to your training and therefore can be predicted very closely (pace and time). Outcomes are items that you have the least control over and are actually an outcome of your goals and targets (qualification and pace).

2. Clarify and define the required process to achieve your previously stated goals.

This could be creating a clearly defined annual training plan that is built around your goals-targets-outcomes. The more clarity with the plan, the more likely they will be achieved. The key being to make the plan unambiguous and right on the edge of your current skills and desired skills — pushing the edge of your current capabilities.

3. Do the required work that your desired outcome requires. 

Quite simply, follow your annual training plan and complete your planned workouts. The not-so-popular secret to success: work as hard as you can for as long as it takes. Every desired outcome in your life has a required response. The bigger the desired outcome, the more difficult and longer it will take to give the required response.

4. Let your success in preparation fuel your self-trust during the race. 

Consistently and repeatedly training to the very best of your ability creates and fuels a courageous mindset. This is called acquired self-confidence. During the race, do what you have repeatedly done — revert back to your training and habits. Don’t prove how good you are, be how good you are.

5. Learn from the race and apply this knowledge for the future. 

The race outcome is feedback on your preparation. If you do not perform how you wanted to, that is the feedback that your preparation was not sufficient. Take this information and begin again more intelligently.

The best way to acquire self-confidence is to do exactly what you are afraid to do. Sometimes you act because you are confident. Your confidence fuels your actions. And sometimes you take action and then build your confidence because you have acted. Confidence is built by action. Both of these require action, you taking the first step to begin the process. Taking action leads to more actions. Opportunities multiply as they are chased.

Original USAT post here

Weekend Preview: Another Great Weekend on Tap

Triathlon Events

Thursday June 28th

 

Boulder Stroke & Stride Week #5

Boulder


XTERRA Night

Boulder


Saturday June 30th

 

BAM Bare Bones OWS Series

Boulder

Join Boulder Aquatic Masters for the first event in the Bare Bones Open Water Swim Series.

Choose from the 1, 2 or 3 mile events.  There is NO RACE DAY Registration.  Online registration ends Friday 7pm


Lookout Mountain Triathlon

Golden


Sunday July 1st

 

Grant Ranch OWS

Lakewood



Cycling Events

Thursday June 28th

 

Leadville Trail 100 Camp of Champions

Leadville


BVV Track Night

Erie


DRAFT + Camber Exchange

Boulder


XTERRA Night

Boulder


Friday June 29th

 

Boulder Omnium: Hill Climb

Boulder


Leadville Trail 100 Camp of Champions

Leadville


Saturday June 30th

 

Fandango MTB

Bailey


Boulder Omnium: TT

Boulder


Cycle to Saturn Century

Golden


Vuelta a Dillon

Dillon


Cannondale MTB Tour

Granby Ranch


Nederland Boulder Stage Race

Boulder


Eagle Ranch Classic

Eagle


Laramie MTB Series

Happy Jack, WY


Rocking the Velodrome

Erie


Leadville Trail 100 Camp of Champions

Leadville


Sunday July 1st

 

Boulder Omnium: Road Race

Boulder


Cannondale MTB Tour

Granby Ranch


Nederland Boulder Stage Race

Boulder


Leadville Trail 100 Camp of Champions

Leadville

Loveland Lake to Lake Triathlon: A Great Event

by Rich Soares

Loveland Lake to Lake has been one of Colorado’s oldest and most popular multisport races – here’s why!

 

Photo by Ryan Muncy

#1 – Courses: The race starts in Lake Loveland with a well-marked swim course and plenty of water safety support.

Since 2001, the Olympic-distance bike course has been a generous thirty-miles (approximately six-mile longer than the standard Olympic-distance) that favors strong riders. A good portion of the race course was closed to cars, giving the riders a safe course to confidently hammer the pedals without concern for traffic. The course starts from Lake Loveland and follows the foothills to the north, featuring a climb to a breathtaking view of Horsetooth Reservoir. On the return from Horsetooth, riders enjoy an exhilarating descent and then a straight shot south back to Lake Loveland where they transition to a relatively flat and fast run course around the lake.

Starting in 2006, Aqua-Bike and Relay were added as categories, and starting in 2013 a Sprint distance course was added to the offering. The Sprint bike course is a flat and fast 15 miles, and the Sprint run course is equally fast taking athletes through North Lake Park with a handful of eye-catching sculptures.

 

#2 Competition: Prior to USAT’s region consolidations, Loveland Lake to Lake served as the Regional USAT Championship race and has historically attracted some of the most competitive triathletes.

Overall Olympic-distance winners Matt Malone and professional Uli Bromme threw down great performances with 2:13:30 and 2:26:09 respectively. The male overall Olympic-distance podium was separated by a mere 60 seconds with Karl Kahsar and Robby Chalfant rounding out 2nd and 3rd places.

The female podium showed Bromme’s domination with nearly 7 minutes separating 1st place from Linsey Knast’s 2nd and Annie Poland’s 3rd place. Whether competing for the races’ top spots, age grouper awards, or beating a previous PR, triathletes showed great sportsmanship and support of their fellow competitors.

#3 Community: For eighteen years, the Lake to Lake race has been a part of the fabric in the northern Colorado community. Race organizer, Peggy Shockley, reflected on how her children have grown up with the race and there is lasting evidence of her family’s fingerprints.

Ft. Collins resident Bruce Fries donned a race shirt from the original 2001 race that featured the artwork drawn by Peggy’s then grade-schoolers. Non-profits, church groups, the Loveland 4-H Club, and other local volunteers have been involved since the beginning. Peggy remembers that there were just a half dozen Loveland athletes in 2001. Now the race has a few hundred athletes from around the region, plus athletes from Texas, Nebraska, California, and as far as Florida.

 

#4 Celebration: The post-race celebration and award ceremony is one of the highlights of the race. This is not the type of race that gives athletes brown bananas and cold bagels as a recovery meal. Peggy and the Loveland Lake to Lake crew pull out all the stops and offer a catered full breakfast buffet.

Peggy explains, “we have hundreds of athletes that come to race with us and we want to give them a great experience.” Athletes built their own breakfast burritos with tortillas, scrambled eggs, pork sausage, pulled beef, ground turkey, black beans, rice and salsa. If that didn’t fill them up, they were able to graze the other buffet table of granola, yogurt, bagels, fruit and more. With their plates full, athletes sat on the lawn of the pavilion to eat and watch the award ceremony.  Food was provided by Catering to You by James   

Loveland Lake to Lake continues to be one of my favorite races in the region and I’m already looking forward to 2019!

Weekend Preview: Another Beautiful Weekend on Tap

Triathlon Events

Thursday June 21st

 

Vixxen Racing Swim Clinic

Boulder


Boulder Stroke & Stride, Week #4

Boulder


Friday June 22nd

 

Leadville 100 Trail Run Training Camp

Leadville


Saturday June 23rd

 

Solstice Sunset Open Water Swim

Longmont

Join Mountain Swim Series as they kick off their 2018 season with the Solstice Sunset Swim at Union Reservoir Saturday June 23rd. Early online registration closes Thursday June 21 at midnight. Race day registration is available for an additional $10 fee.

 


Loveland Lake to Lake Triathlon

Loveland


TriBella Women Only Triathlon

Cherry Creek Reservoir


Leadville 100 Trail Run Training Camp

Leadville


Sunday June 24th

 

Rachel Joyce & Dana Platin Run Clinic

Boulder


Boulder Sunrise Triathlon

Boulder


South Suburban TRYathlon

Centennial


Tri on the Plains

Sterling


Tri the Boat

Steamboat Springs


Leadville 100 Trail Run Training Camp

Leadville



Cycling Events

Thursday June 21st

 

BVV Thursday Night Racing

Erie


Grintas Cycling Retreat

Steamboat Springs


Crested Butte Bike Week

Crested Butte


USAC Pro Road, ITT & Criterium National Championships

Knoxville, TN


Friday June 22nd

 

Pactimo Pop-Up Store

Denver


Mountain Bike Capital USA Weekend Event

Winter Park


Grintas Cycling Retreat

Steamboat Springs


Crested Butte Bike Week

Crested Butte


USAC Pro Road, ITT & Criterium National Championships

Knoxville, TN


Saturday June 23rd

 

Mavic Haute Route Rockies

Boulder to Colorado Springs – the long way

 

 


EPIC Singletrack Series: Point to Point

Winter Park


Bring Out Yer Bike 

Denver


Laramie MTB Series

Happy Jack, WY


VIDA Mtb Clinic: Trestle Bike Park

Winter Park


BME Series: Crested Butte

Crested Butte


4SOH

Ft. Collins


BoulderCentre for Orthopedics Criterium

Golden


Colorado Bike MS

Westminster – Ft. Collins


Grintas Cycling Retreat

Steamboat Springs


Crested Butte Bike Week

Crested Butte


USAC Pro Road, ITT & Criterium National Championships

Knoxville, TN


Sunday June 24th

 

Big Ring Cycles Demo Days

Golden

Join Big Ring Cycles, Rocky Mountain Bicycles, Shimano and Bike-a-Latte at New Terrain Brewery and test drive great new bikes out on the trails at North Table Mountain from 8am-noon on Sunday, June 24th! Check out new shoes by Pearl Izumi, New Terrain’s food truck – J-Street, New Terrain Brewery


Bicycle Tour of Colorado

Leadville and beyond


John Stenner Memorial TT

Keensburg


Mavic Haute Route Rockies

Boulder to Colorado Springs – the long way


Colorado Bike MS

Westminster – Ft. Collins


Grintas Cycling Retreat

Steamboat Springs


BME Series: Crested Butte

Crested Butte


VIDA Mtb Clinic: Trestle Bike Park

Winter Park


Crested Butte Bike Week

Crested Butte


USAC Pro Road, ITT & Criterium National Championships

Knoxville, TN