8 Fitness Trends for 2018

Kickboxing, functional movement flow and brain-training… check out all the latest research-supported trends as reported by by Pete McCall at the American Council on Exercise

This is the perfect opportunity to gaze into the future and attempt to predict what will happen in the fitness industry over the coming year.

Based on wide-ranging research and numerous conversations with colleagues working for health clubs, equipment companies and education organizations, I’ve identified some of the fitness trends we are most likely to see in the coming year. The trends listed below, although not an exhaustive list by any means, represent opportunities for you to increase your knowledge as a health and fitness professional, and identify potential areas of growth in 2018.

(Note: If you’d like to judge the accuracy of my soothsaying abilities, here are the trend lists for 2017, 2016, 2015 and 2014. It’s a shame I can’t make the same predictions about the outcomes of football games or the stock market.)

1
Boxing and kickboxing workouts will experience a resurgence in popularity.

Recently, there has been an increase in the number of studios opening up to offer these physically demanding workouts, as well as an increase in the number of boxing/kickboxing classes showing up on group fitness schedules.

2
2018 will make a rediscovery of functional training.

After years of high-intensity interval training reigning supreme, 2018 will make a rediscovery of functional training that emphasizes movement quality over load and intensity. Lashaun Dale, vice president for content and programming at 24 Hour Fitness who specializes in being a futurist for the fitness industry, suggests that class programming will shift toward an emphasis on what she calls “conscious movement,” as opposed to simply pushing the intensity of a workout to reach the point of exhaustion.

3
Fitness programs will become more mindful with instructors and trainers incorporating various strategies to promote flow states via exercise…

Check out the full article for more trends including mindful exercise, brain training, and more.

 

Read the full story

Butterfield Wins Bermuda Marathon in 2:27

Always one to recognize and compliment the competition, as well as thanking the cheering crowds, Longmont’s Tyler Butterfield won yesterday’s Bermuda Marathon with grace, and gratitude.

From the Royal Gazette

Tyler Butterfield followed in the example set by Dage Minors in Friday’s Elite Mile when he ran to victory in the Bermuda Marathon yesterday in near-perfect running conditions.

Butterfield, Bermuda’s top male triathlete who returned from his home in Boulder, Colorado to compete for the first time in several years, set the pace after a 1hr 14min time for the first loop on his way to a winning time of 2:27:07 ahead of last year’s winner, Bryan Morseman, of the United States, who clocked 2:28:43. Third was Abu Kebede Diriba, of Ethiopia, in 2:37:44.

“I’ve done one marathon before and that was a 2:42 [time] when I was 21, a good 14 years ago,” Butterfield said after his victory. “I ran a 2:48 in an Ironman, so I knew with a 2:42 I should be able to improve on that.”

Butterfield ran several miles with another local runner, Chayce Smith, who was competing in the Bermuda Half-Marathon.

“Chayce and I ran the first lap together and it was great hearing everyone cheering us on,” Butterfield said. “It was nice to have some locals up the front.

“Bryan led me through the first half and then we ran the first mile or two [second loop] together before I pulled away just after Trimingham Hill.

“There was a slight downhill before the flat to McGall’s Hill and I had speed coming off the hill and just went with it. I thought I might regret it later because it was a little quick. The first lap was a negative split but I have to say there was a lot of people out there cheering. Thank you to the people who come out every year.”

Butterfield and Morseman were tucked in with the Half-Marathon lead pack, before the field started to open up after the two-mile mark and Butterfield carried on to win,

Butterfield still holds the senior schools mile record of 4:27:30, which he set in 1999 when a student at Saltus.

 

Read the full article

Tyler Butterfield tackling Bermuda Marathon this weekend

From the Royal Gazette

Triathlete Tyler Butterfield will run in Bermuda Marathon Weekend as he continues his preparation for the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia, in April.

Butterfield is to return home from Boulder, Colorado, tomorrow and will be among hundreds taking part in the full marathon on Sunday — the final race of the three-day event.

The 34-year-old, whose schedule does not usually allow him to compete in the Bermuda Marathon Weekend, will also take part in the Butterfield & Vallis 5K next weekend, which marks the 100th anniversary of his family’s wholesale business.

“I’m super excited about doing a road race in Bermuda again,” Butterfield said.

“I miss doing May 24, but some years the timing works and others it doesn’t due to other races over here in the United States or internationally.

“I’m pumped to get to do a bit of Bermuda Marathon Weekend, a weekend I used to always look forward to when I lived on the island. I’m not looking at anything special from myself in the marathon; I just want to enjoy it.

“I will be racing off mostly base training and it will be one of my last long, harder runs before I switch to focus on more speed.”

Butterfield left his mark in the schools’ KPMG Front Street Mile races in the early 2000s when he set several records. His schedule will not allow him to return in time to watch those races.

“I would love to come on Thursday to watch the Front Street Mile on Friday night, but I’ve one other sponsor trip I had to do this week, today and tomorrow.”

Butterfield is also looking forward to competing in the Butterfield & Vallis race, along with brother Spencer. He will also be the guest speaker at the Bermuda Triathlon Association’s prize-giving dinner at the Loft at Flanagan’s next Saturday.

“Tickets for that are available at Raceday World, and it should be a fun night talking about modern racing, the old days of triathlon and racing with my dad Jim.

“Then the next day I will be at the Butterfield & Vallis 5k to celebrate the [company’s] 100th anniversary. It’s a perfect distance for everyone to come out and enjoy a family event.

“It’s great to be able to be home for both weekends and three great events. Bermuda always has so much going on.”

Butterfield will then turn his focus to the Commonwealth Games, where he hopes to be a part of a triathlon relay team including Flora Duffy, Tyler Smith and Erica Hawley.

“After this trip to Bermuda, it will be back to Colorado and a training camp in Arizona to start to get ready for Commonwealth Games in April,” he said.

 

Read the full article

Coeur Sports Launches “Collective Beat” Community

Coeur Sports has announced they will launch the Collective Beat women’s triathlon community in 2018:

We created The Collective Beat so that we could expand our community beyond our team of ambassadors and professionals. The goal is to draw in more amazing women who are instinctively aligned with the Coeur mission of building a nation of encouraging, supportive, and positive endurance sports athletes.

Our goal is to help make connections that can last a lifetime.

There will be a nominal fee to join The Collective Beat and we wanted to share our thinking behind the program and also tell everyone about the benefits.

So, let’s start with the benefits. We set up the benefits so that members will receive much more in value than the cost of membership. First, members will receive a $200 clothing allowance that can be used to purchase some beautiful and exclusive apparel.

To see the full line, just go to the Collective Beat page on the Coeur Website

The gear will be designed specifically for TCB members and will be delivered around the first of April next year. Just as the North American Tri Season gets going.

Members will also receive a free women’s specific triathlon training plan that was developed by the ladies over at Hardcoeur coaching. These plans retail for up to $149.99 and we have a selection of distances that range from sprint to full iron distance.

We’ll also be giving members an an unlimited use, 20% discount code that is good all year long for Coeur Sports and Zele by Coeur products. You’ll be able to begin using your discount as soon as you join and it can be used on the new 2018 line that we just rolled out.

Plus, our amazing partners are also providing some incredible discounts. So if you’ve ever wanted to try something from great companies, like Barnanas, Zelios, Breakthrough Nutrition, Normatek, Inside Tracker and more, then this is your chance. Just sign up and do some shopping.

Finally, members will have access to a social site where they can cheer for each other and keep up with new benefits as they become available. In our heart of hearts, we believe that the social connection will be one of the most special benefits that members receive.

If this plays out the way we hope, people will know that if someone is wearing TCB gear, then there’s an extremely good chance that that individual is positive, encouraging, relatable, and approachable. We’ve said it time and again, that the first step (or pedal) into endurance sports can be a bit scary and we hope that Collective Beat members will be little beacons of encouragement all around the world.

All in all, we think this is a fantastic package of benefits that will more than cover the $250 cost of the program. We’ll be welcoming members until January 31, 2018 and then the membership will be valid until January 31, 2019.

Check out all the details

Casting for Season Two of “IRONMAN: QUEST FOR KONA” Now Open

Series to run in 2018 through top international broadcasters; Casting submissions open until February 1, 2018

TAMPA, Fla. (December 15, 2017) — IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holdings company, announced today that applications for the second season of “IRONMAN: Quest for Kona”, are now being accepted globally.

The series, which just finished airing its first full season on NBCSN and Red Bull TV to positive reviews, is scheduled to air in 2018 and will profile ten athletes from around the world as they embark on their journey to qualifying for the most iconic single-day endurance event, the IRONMAN® World Championship which will take place in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i on October 13, 2018. Throughout the series, athletes will evolve physically and emotionally as they pursue the goal of competing among the best in the world.

“We are excited to embark on our search for the next set of IRONMAN competitors who are willing to share their stories of dedication and perseverance in working toward their ultimate goal – qualifying for the 2018 IRONMAN World Championship,” said Christopher Stadler, Chief Marketing Officer of IRONMAN. “I am confident that we are going to have another cast of remarkable athletes looking to share their extraordinary and awe-inspiring stories.”

Each episode will feature one charismatic and engaging contender as they take on a specific IRONMAN qualifying event, capturing the breathtaking scenery, local culture and unique athletic challenges that each setting presents. While not every athlete may ultimately qualify, each will show that IRONMAN is about persevering, enduring and being a part of something larger than themselves, proving that ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE®.

Self-shot footage will be utilized to capture each person’s real-time journey as a supplement to the broadcast content. “IRONMAN: Quest for Kona” takes aspirational athletes and puts their mission front and center, inviting viewers to experience the personal highs and lows of each pursuit. Air dates and channels for each market will be released in the coming months.

Casting for the second season is currently open globally, with the first round of submission due by February 1, 2018. Additional information and casting application is available at www.ironman.com/questforkona.

For more information on the IRONMAN brand and global event series, visit www.ironman.com. For media related inquiries, please contact press@ironman.com.

Women’s Wednesday: Colorado’s Sarah Thomas – the woman who swam a century and made history

Sarah Thomas © Ken Classen

 “…only three athletes active today have finished ‘current-neutral’ swims of 63 miles or more — all three of them women.”

Unnoticed and unfeted, a US swimmer is breaking the sport’s boundaries

From Financial Times

Last week Sarah Thomas got up at 5am and drove the 25 miles from her home to the swimming pool in Lakewood, Colorado, as she does most mornings. There she completed her 6,000-yard workout before heading to work as a healthcare recruiter. She was untroubled by autograph hunters; no TV crews stopped her to seek an interview.

And yet Thomas is, according to Steven Munatones, founder of the World Open Water Swimming Association, “an outlier, a once-in-a-generation athlete, and a motivator who is showing others how far they can push themselves”. In August she completed what must rank as one of 2017’s greatest achievements in endurance sport, swimming further than anyone — man or woman — has swum before without the assistance of currents: a scarcely believable 104 miles, nonstop, in three days and nights in the water.

“The record wasn’t really the big incentive for me,” Thomas tells me from her home in Denver. “It was about finding and pushing my personal limits.” What could be a weary trope coming from many athletes rings true from Thomas. She swims without sponsorship — fitting her training around her full-time job. Her achievements have received little media attention; her record-breaking swim has not, to date, even been mentioned in a national newspaper.

“Sarah herself doesn’t seek out publicity,” Ken Classen, her coach and training partner, tells me. “If it wasn’t for her friends and mother-in-law she’d probably have no publicity and quite frankly I don’t think she’d care either way.”

Last year Thomas swam a record 82 miles nonstop in Lake Powell but felt she could go further — the 100-mile barrier beckoned. In choosing the current-free Lake Champlain for her swim, Thomas was attempting something no one of either gender had previously done. “A few people have swum over 100 miles before,” explains Evan Morrison, co-founder of the Marathon Swimming Federation, that adjudicated Thomas’ swim, but only with the assistance of strong, predictable currents.

These include a 139.8-mile effort by the late Croatian swimmer, Veljko Rogosic, in the Adriatic. “His swim was very impressive, but it belongs in a separate category,” explains Morrison. According to his records, only three athletes active today have finished “current-neutral” swims of 63 miles or more — all three of them women.

Beat Knechtle, a Swiss doctor and endurance athlete who has studied female performance in open-water swimming, offers two possible explanations for this dominance. “Women have an advantage due to their higher body fat, which provides insulation against the cold and better buoyancy.” As wetsuits may not be worn for official open-water swims, this could be an important advantage. Then there is the mental side. “In open-water swimming women have learnt that they are able to beat men and therefore expect to compete at a higher level,” says Knechtle.

Thomas agrees. “Women have a long history of swimming: it’s been socially acceptable for us to be athletes in the pool and open water for much longer than in other sports. I think having that strong foundation has really helped women to compete and train at a high level.”

Read the full article

Colorado man, 75, dies following triathlon at Sudgen Regional Park, officials say

Sugden Regional Park in East Naples offers a host of activities, many centered around the 60-acre lake.

From Naples News

A Colorado man died following a triathlon at Sugden Regional Park in East Naples on Sunday, officials said.

A Collier County Sheriff’s Office deputy stationed at the event to coordinate traffic was alerted by a man about 7:20 a.m. that “there is a man in the water, not breathing,” according to a Sheriff’s Office incident report.

The deputy ran to the shoreline of the lake where he found a man, later identified as 75-year-old James Treadwell, lying on the sand and being tended to by a Collier County EMS paramedic, two race participants and Treadwell’s wife, the report states.

After confirming Treadwell had no pulse and wasn’t breathing, the group began cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Read the full story

303Radio Interviews Stryd’s Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson

303radio was in Boulder recently interviewing Nick Obletz and Angus Nelson of Stryd–the running power meter and finding out why it should be under the Christmas tree this year.

If you aren’t familiar with running with a power meter you will want to listen to this podcast to learn why running with power can help you be faster and more efficient.

 

Also, be sure to check out our full story on Stryd by Rich Soares from our Holiday Gift Guide.

The SALT in your Sweat: The Nitty Gritty of Sodium Testing

By Dana Willett

As multi-sport athletes, we’ve pretty much all heard about the importance of salt – sodium – electrolytes – during endurance activities, especially in hot weather.

But how much? And what kind? And how often?

The go-to “test” most athletes are familiar with is a sweat rate test – weigh yourself before exercise, go hard for an hour, weigh yourself again, and do the math on how much fluid you lose (details below). Then load up with any of the many sports drinks out on the market, and try to consume close to the amount you normally sweat out.

BUT. So many different products. And they all affect our guts in different ways.

Salts and minerals that can conduct electrical impulses in the body. Common human electrolytes are sodium chloride, potassium, calcium, and sodium bicarbonate. Electrolytes control the fluid balance of the body and are important in muscle contraction, energy generation, and almost every major biochemical reaction in the body. –From Medical Dictionary

And, perhaps more importantly, the concentration of sodium in your sweat is as important to understand and utilize as your sweat rate.

My coach has recommended I use the current off season to tackle any testing and nutrition questions, so I have plenty of time over the winter and spring to integrate any changes and trial-and-error any new products. I’ve had year-over-year trouble with gut issues and muscle cramping, so salt intake is at the top of my list.

I checked in with resident expert Ryan Ignatz at Colorado Multisport, who agreed, saying, “Now is a good time to consider Sodium Composition Testing since people have more time and can start implementing their new knowledge with their bigger indoor workouts. Often we see people just drink water when they ride inside through the winter, which can actually create a bit of issue in their sodium balance after a few workouts.”

I booked an appointment at CMS for the sweat test and was surprised to learn no workout was involved. This test can be done any time, with no exercise-induced sweat necessary.

I sat comfortably in a chair, and Ryan applied a small disk to my forearm, secured with a strap.

The disk is equipped with a type of electrode that promotes a sweat reaction on the skin just below the disk.

The sweat is collected in a tiny coil of tubing inside another disk called a macroduct; once enough sweat has been collected, Ryan withdraws the fluid using a syringe and analyzes it with the Precision Hydration machine.

And just like that it’s confirmed – I am a salty sweater!

I’m in the “high” category, bordering on “very high.”

I need 1331mg of sodium for every liter of sweat that I lose.

Levels of sodium loss fall anywhere between 200mg or 2200 mg  – but the proportion each individual loses stays the same (except for hyponutremia, a condition caused by overhydrating with plain water – without sodium – and water diluting the blood stream). Thus, each athlete’s sodium concentration level is individual, similar to a blood type or VO2 max… it’s yours for life, and it does not change.

When I do a traditional sweat test (see below), I lose two pounds over an hour – so I basically need at least a full liter of fluid and 1200-1300mg of sodium for every hour of racing. Plus 200-300 calories an hour.

The immediacy, and accuracy of this data is quite reassuring, especially given my history.

During my last full Ironman, I suffered kidney trouble. I was using a well-respected endurance formula (“exclusive blend… all the electrolytes an endurance athlete needs… no need to supplement with salt tablets...”). I consumed 24 oz an hour, 240 calories, 334mg of sodium – not nearly enough sodium for me.

Unknowingly, hour after hour, I was about 1000mg shy of meeting my sodium needs, compounding every 60 minutes. Plus I supplemented with some extra water – which only further diluted my blood sodium level. No wonder mid-way through the day my kidneys weren’t working well, and after the event I experienced mild rhabdomyolysis .

The key is the sodium concentration in your sweat, and your sports drink.

Ryan reassures me, underlining the importance of ratios over quantity: “Its more about the concentration of sodium in the fluid you drink – it’s not only about how many milligrams per hour, because that varies depending upon different conditions, such as intensity, temperature, etc.; both your sodium concentration, and sweat rate are important. You need to drink to thirst, and make sure your drink contains the correct sodium concentration – that is what is important.”

Determining those formulas ahead of time is the key to solid hydration: Ryan says to look at packages, and really read the labels. “If Gatorade Endurance is on course, look at those sodium levels ahead of time and consider how much you’ll need.” Another thing to consider is everyday nutrition, and sodium intake during training sessions. “Athletes who train regularly and eat ‘clean’ tend to not add salt, and may not get enough in their everyday diet,” Ryan adds – another reason to dial in sodium levels to ensure training fluids are the proper concentration.

The next part of the sweat test included reviewing the leading products on the market, factoring the sodium levels, and taking into account past gut-checks, calories, delivery method (salt capsules, stick-licks, powders, etc.).

When you study the variety of offerings, you might be surprised. For example,  Endurolytes by Hammer – whose name indicates a product appropriate for endurance events (“Electrolyte replenishment done right“) – has only 40mg of sodium per capsule.

Do the math… for me, needing 1300mg of sodium per hour, I would need 32.5 capsules every hour. Thirty-two+ pills. Every hour.

There are different types of salt… Sodium Citrate is not as strong tasting… and Sodium chloride is table salt.

Ryan suggests drinking to thirst, and then separating your carbohydrates/calories from your fueling. He recommends dialing in your hydration: “Make sure everything that you drink has a certain concentration of electrolyte – that way, no matter what amount you drink, you always have the best ratio of sodium to fluid for your personal body chemistry. ”

Base salt… Boulder salt… Salt Stick… what’s the difference? “Mostly method of delivery,” Ryan says. “From a salt shaker kind of delivery, where you lick the dispenser, to capsules, under the tongue delivery (bypassing the stomach), to a canister with a scoop for mixing with fluid.” Other things to consider are packaging (key when you’re trying to ingest while in the aerobars or carrying on the run), and cost. Some offer better ability to measure intake-specific doses.

What if you find yourself on a course, your unsure of your sodium needs, and salt is being offered? Ryan says, if in doubt, take it. “Most of the time it’s probably a benefit because most people aren’t doing enough.”

“When we exercise the number one job the body has is to cool itself – through sweat,” Ryan points out. “It will do that above just about anything else. Sodium concentration is key to this process.”

One final point from Ryan: “Drinking to schedule can work against you – drinking to thirst, with proper ratio of electrolyte to fluid, is the best practice.” And, “Always, always, check the math!”

Contact Colorado Multisport to book your Sodium Composition Test. The cost us normally $129 – mention this article and 303Triathlon for a 10% discount plus 10% back through December 31, 2017!

A certificate for the test can make a great gift for the triathlete in your life.

RELATED:

Tri Hearter: Science In Your Life?

 

Your standard sweat check procedure is:

  1. Check your weight before and after training, and calculate weight loss.
  2. Convert any weight loss to ounces or ml of fluid.
  3. Check/measure the amount of fluid consumed during training.
  4. Add the amount of fluid lost to the amount of fluid consumed to get total fluid losses.
  5. Divide the total amount of fluid lost by the number of hours of training to get fluid losses per hour.
Originally from Ironman

303 THANKSgiving

By Bill Plock

I’m stumped. How can 303cycling, 303triathlon and 303radio even begin to thank everyone that supports us? Where do we start, who do we include? Everyone of course. Everyone who rides bikes, does triathlons, starts a race, pops a wheelie, runs on a trail, and just has fun doing what so many of us love.

Originally I thought I would like to thank those organizations and people who support us and make 303 even a possibility. But that just seemed too limiting and sort of missing the point. The point being we exists to celebrate pretty much anything that has to do with moving any direction on a bike, in a wetsuit or with running shoes on. But more than that, doing it with a smile, in places that make us smile, in events that challenge us and sometimes it’s just hanging out with our friends and community that makes it all worthwhile.

It’s about the smiles, the relationships and the community. So as Thanksgiving is upon us the entire 303network thanks you, our readers, for simply being part of the journey to share Colorado’s athletes, participants, organizations, races, events, and companies that make it all possible and put smiles on our faces. Please check out this album on Facebook of a few smiles collected over the year!

The 303 Team is forever in gratitude. Happy Thanksgiving.