Alison Freeman’s bike phsyio testing at CU sports performance center

WHY IS A LAB LACTATE TEST WORTH THE PAIN?

I recently went to the relatively new and categorically state-of-the-art CU Sports Medicine and Performance Center (CUSMPC) for some physiological and metabolic testing. Before the testing, I was taking on a tour of CUSMPC. I had *no idea* that I had access to a world-class sports performance facility practically in my backyard. In addition to physio and metabolic testing for bike and run, CUSMPC houses orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, an AlterG (anti-gravity!) treadmill, two methodologies for high performance bike fits, running gait analysis, swim stroke analysis and physio testing, and cycling classes (think spin classes but BYO bike). All of which is open to the general public. Who knew? Clearly not me.

But back to the matter at hand …

WHAT IS IT?
The physiological and metabolical performance testing done at CUSMPC measures your heart rate, blood lactate levels, fat and carbohydrate oxidation rates, and VO2 across a spectrum of workloads – either paces on the run, or power outputs on the bike – with the goal of scientifically determining your individualized heart rate, pace, and power based training zones as well as establish ideal racing paces. The tests are conducted by Jared Berg, a certified strength and conditioning specialist as well as a former pro triathlete and current coach, and have been tailored by him to reflect the physiological demand of endurance events.

Even if your eyes glazed over as I described the testing, what should have jumped out was the idea that your ideal racing paces can be scientifically defined based on your physiological and metabolic profile.

WHY SHOULD YOU CARE?
If you’re looking to run and ride recreationally, and participate in triathlons for fun and fitness, then maybe you don’t care about your dialing in your training zones and race paces. But, if you’re starting to get serious about improving your performance, these pieces of data are pretty critical.

Many of us do field tests (such as 20 minute time trials for the bike and 5k time trials for the run) to estimate our lactate threshold heart rate (LTHR), functional threshold power (FTP), and run threshold pace. We then use these results to determine our training zones (more on that here). This is an easily repeatable and cost-effective approach – and a good start.

The results of field tests aren’t going to be as precise as a lab test, but typically – about 80% of the time, according to Jared – are reasonably accurate. What tends to be less accurate / less personalized, are those standard percentages that you use to set your training zones. Just check out how drastically my heart rate zones (left) and power zones (right) changed in the chart below. The blue zones are based on the standard percentages, and the green zones are the personalized zones set by Jared, based on my testing. Training zones are definitely not one-size-fits-all.

HOW DOES IT WORK?
Your time with Jared at CUSMPC will start with a weigh in and caliper test to measure body fat percentage, and some guidance on where you’ll want to be by race day. (Compared to my scale at home, I weighed in a few pounds heavier but my body fat came in a few percentage points lower, so: Win!)

We then set up my tri bike on CUSMPC’s Wahoo Kickr and I warmed up at a super easy effort level for a solid 30 minutes. (You can also use their spin bike with a built-in perfectly calibrated power meter, or you’ll be on a treadmill for the run test.) Once I was sufficiently warmed up, Jared had me don the only moderately annoying mask, necessary to measure oxidation rates. We then kicked in with the test: intervals of either five or ten minutes, at increasing power levels, and ear pricks for blood samples every five minutes. Just ‘cause sweating your ass off while breathing through a mask isn’t quite enough fun for one day. All-in-all, I was on my bike for well over an hour, and given the effort level of the test was totally able to use that as my bike workout for the day.

After the test was over, I cooled down and Jared used that time to run all the numbers. That’s where the real insight comes in. Once you’ve changed out of your sweaty, smelly bike clothes, you’ll sit with Jared in a consult room and review your test results. Jared first takes the time to provide background on things like typical lactate profiles across a range of athletes before diving into your specific results. Then he’ll show you your data through a series of graphs, explaining and interpreting all the details and answering questions as you have them. In addition to providing your lactate threshold heart rate and functional threshold power, Jared will dial in your training zones, suggested race targets for power and/or heart rate, and race-day fueling guidelines tailored for your glycogen stores, race intensity and race distance. He also provides recommendations for your training – how much time to spend training in each zone to achieve your desired race results.

HOW DO YOU GET STARTED?
Signing up for physiological and metabolic testing at CUSMPC is beyond easy. Just go to the CUSMPC website, review the services, pick a time slot, and – viola! – you’re good to go. Wondering whether to do the testing on the bike or the run? Interesting question. I prefer the testing on the bike because the uncomfortable mask doesn’t drive me crazy as much on the bike as when I’m literally gasping for air on the run. Also, if you bike with power then you will definitely want to test on the bike so you can get your FTP checked as well as your LTHR. If you still can’t decide, I’d go with the discipline in which you’d most like to improve.

Final tip: I highly recommend adding a sweat test onto your physio and metabolic testing. The sweat test will reveal your sweat rate and concentration, which then determines your fluid and sodium requirements during training and racing. That’s the kind of information that can save your race – it’s a no brainer add-on.

7 Reasons Cycling is better than Running

From Cycling Magazine

Not to dis our sister sport, but let’s face it, cycling rules. We can prove it.
By selene yeager

There’s a lot to love about running. It’s cheap to get started, great for torching calories, and works well with nearly any cross-training regimen you may have. But in the ongoing bar bet of which sport is best, we believe cycling is still the overall winner. (And, we think we can prove it.) Here’s why.

 

Get Fit & Build Endurance

True running burns more calories per mile, but most people can’t run as many miles as they can ride, especially if you’re a little out of shape or have some weight to lose. Blame gravity. When you run you need to lift your body weight up off the earth to propel yourself forward. Then you have to come back down, striking the ground and absorbing those impact forces. Both of those things make it considerably harder to run five miles than to ride twice or even three or four times as long. Running is also less forgiving of extra pounds with every excess pound slowing you down. Excess weight makes hills harder on a bike, but on the flats? Because gravity isn’t really a factor, you can motor along with the skinniest of ‘em.

 

Pain Points

Running beats you up more than cycling, even if you’re hammering super hard. One study that compared trained, competitive cyclists and runners exercising 2 ½ hours a day for three days found that the long distance runners had substantially more muscle damage (between 133% and 404% more), inflammation levels (up to 256% higher) and muscle soreness (87% more) in the following 38 hour recovery period than the cyclists. “We knew running places more stress on the body, but how much more damage and inflammation there was was surprising and greater than anticipated,” says study author David Nieman, MPH, professor of public health at Appalachian State University. “There’s just a lot more muscle trauma involved with running. It’s harder for the immune system to handle the damage.”

Go Places!

The ability to ride for multiple hours means you can cover a lot of ground and see some amazing sites in a relatively short period of time. You don’t see many running tours of California wine country or through the Italian Dolomites. But there are literally hundreds of amazing bike tours you can take all over the world. You also can carry far more things far more easily on a bike than you can on foot. You not only can stuff your jersey pockets to the gills, but also wear a messenger bag or backpack and even add carrying capacity to your bike. That frees you to use your bike for commuting, day tripping, bikepacking and as everyday Earth-friendly transportation.

 

Read the full, original article here

 

37 Reasons Running Is SO Much Better Than Bicycling on 303cycling here

Feedback Sports App for Bike Maintenance

Inspiration for new products/services can often come from frustration. How many of us have sticky notes and random receipts stuffed in drawers to help us keep track of when we last did what to which bike? It was exactly this sort of thing that prompted Feedback Sports to develop their bicycle maintenance app. #nomorestickynotes #yourbikedeservesbetter #releaseyourinnergeek 

By John Marsh, Editor & Publisher, RoadBikeRider

A couple of weeks ago, I bought a new work stand from Feedback Sports. While I was looking around the site, I noticed that Feedback offers a free maintenance tracking app.

Upon a closer look at the app, I quickly realized it is exactly what I’ve been looking for to keep track of my bike’s components and maintenance schedule. (In fact, I wrote a sticky note to myself about two years ago with an idea for this very same app. I’m glad they read my mind and built it!)

It comes in both iOS (Apple) and Android versions. You can find them on the App Store and at Google Play. Here are links for info:

iOS

Android

Here’s How the App Works

For each of your bikes (you can also take a photo of each bike for reference), you can easily input all of your various components (and fit specs like saddle height and reach) across categories including:

- Frame, Fork, Headset
- Handlebar, Saddle, Seatpost
- Accessories (computers and such)
- Drivetrain
- Brakes
- Wheels, Tires

For the components, you can add detail including the date added to your bike, the weight, cost, description, etc. What you’re left with is a front-to-back, top-to-bottom snapshot of every single jot and tittle about your bike, including the serial number, which could come in handy in case of theft, for warranty purposes, etc.

Then you can set a maintenance schedule and keep records of your maintenance using the app.

Zen-Like Experience Recording It All

I sat down in front of a fire on a recent weekend day when it was too nasty out to ride and worked through the details, hunting down any stray receipts I had, jogging my memory of when I put on those shifters, when I rebuilt my custom wheels, and so on.

I found it a very pleasant way to spend a couple of hours. And while I know I was likely not exact in the dates for everything, I now have a consolidated, easily referenced and pretty accurate record of every single aspect of my main bike. (One bike at a time!)

So now I can quickly see exactly when I installed my last chain, rings, cassette, tires, shift and brake cables, etc. (You can even catalog your tubes, but I drew the line there). And I can set up a maintenance schedule for any component. For instance, I’ve set up a reminder to check my chain near a date at which I think it might be worn enough to change.

I suspect I’ll be checking on various components more by feel than by set reminders, but the main thing is that I’ll be able to know exactly when they were installed. To me, that’s half the battle and will totally remove any future guesswork.

I’m glad I stumbled upon this app. I know it’s going to be super-useful over time.

Conclusion: 
Annnnnnd it’s free. Has anyone mentioned this? Get your bikes dialed. Your bike shop will thank you when you actually have an answer for “When was the last time you____?” instead of standing there, mouth agape with a blank look on your face. 

Women’s Wednesday: From the Couch to Dash n Dine

From the Boulder Dash n Dine Series

By Cheri Felix

Like many great things in my life, it was a friend who introduced me to The Dash & Dine Run Series. We went on the final night of the series in 2015. It was darkish outside and rainy and cold and it seemed that only the “serious” people were out that night. I mean really, if you had to choose between your couch on a night like that and running a 5k in the rain with a bunch of strangers, wouldn’t you choose the couch? I’ll cut to the chase. It was so much fun and it was so gratifying that I waited all the next year for the series to start again. I wasn’t going to miss out.

A 5k. It’s a nice low number and if you convert it to miles, it’s even lower; 3.1 miles. It can be a tougher distance for long distance runners but for the REST of us, it’s completely manageable. Like, even if you walk/run or run/walk or mostly walk with a side of running, it’s manageable. And when you’re done, there’s food waiting for you. And there’s the lovely feeling you get when you realize you could’ve stayed home to watch Netflix or make dinner or clean our your kid’s lunchbox but you chose to go for a group run instead. It’s like the best feeling. Way better than the one you get from cleaning out the lunchbox.

Is it a race? For some. Is it timed? Yes. Do you have to race? No. Here’s how you do it; you show up, you run and at the end of the race, you’ll know how long it took you. What you do with that information is up to you. Me? I try to get a little faster. I compete with myself. No matter how long it takes me, I feel proud of myself. At the end of the day, I pushed myself for a small window of time mostly with strangers mixed with a few friends. And someone fed me. It really is awesome. Come on out this year. Don’t be like me. Don’t wait until the last night in the series. And it is fun. It’s not serious. It’s only running. It’s just you, your feet and your (elevated) heart rate having a little Tuesday night date night.

Plan Now
Tuesday nights at the Boulder Reservoir. Series begins April 11th. Don’t wait to see if it fits in your life. Sign up and tell your favorite (or least favorite) friends.

Next time we’ll talk about what to wear (whatever you want) and what you can expect. We’ll also be talking about the 5k distance and I’ll give you some completely novice tips. It will be like a Food Network or HGTV show except no one will cry and you don’t have to make big decisions.

See additional series details and sign up here.

Bosley, clubs, pass along Bolder Boulder training tips

Cliff Bosley, 13, center, sprints to the finish on the Boulder High School football field during the 1980 Bolder Boulder 10K. Today, Bosley is the Bolder Boulder race director.

From the Daily Camera

When Cliff Bosley was a kid growing up in Boulder, he learned how to train from a master, Olympic marathon champ Frank Shorter.

A couple of times a month as a sixth, seventh and eighth grader, Bosley’s father, Steve, would drop Cliff off at the Chautauqua- area home of Shorter, named by Track & Field News at the time as the “Marathoner of the Decade.”

Cliff Bosley would run 5 or 6 miles of Shorter’s longer run, keeping up for as long as he could. Call it Training 101, as Bosley was absorbing training lessons from a U.S. track record holder as well as one of the top road racers in the world.

“That is where I was first introduced to the concept of hard and easy days, interval training, hill training,” Bosley, 50, said in a phone interview last week. “Those runs were hard for me and easy for Frank. He was teaching me how to listen to the cues in my own running, relating to how hard to push, when to rest, when do easy runs, when to do hard runs, those kinds of things.”

With all that knowledge, Bosley said, half jokingly, “I should have been way better.”

Bosley trained well enough to run sub-40 minutes at altitude, with a Bolder Boulder best of42:27. As a 12-year old in the first Bolder Boulder, he clocked 47:02, good enough for 10th in his age group.

Read the full story here

UPDATE on Triathlete Banned for Doping Racing Ultras, Balogh’s Justification

Holly Balogh: Holly Balogh cycles up Fish Creek Road last June. Balogh was suspended by Ironman for four years after testing positive for testosterone. In addition to Ironman races, Balogh is barred from events put on by USA Track and Field and USA Cycling, among other organizations. – RYAN DORGAN / NEWS&GUIDE FILE

From Jackson Hole News and Guide

Balogh said prohibited substance was for medical use, not sport.

Jackson amateur triathlete Holly Balogh tested positive for a prohibited substance last year and accepted a four-year suspension from Ironman, according to a press release sent out Feb. 21 by the Ironman Anti-Doping Program.

Balogh, 46, tested positive for an exogenous testosterone or its metabolites. She was tested May 14 following her first-place finish in the women’s 45-49 age group at the 2016 Ironman North American Championship Texas.

Balogh did not have a therapeutic use exemption for the testosterone and began serving her suspension July 11, 2016. The Jackson real estate associate said she didn’t apply for a therapeutic use exemption — which those in the sport abbreviate to TUE — because she said she didn’t know what a TUE was.

“I didn’t think that I was doping,” she said. “I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong.”

The press release said Balogh “was aware of the inherent risks associated with her conduct and proceeded to knowingly take the prohibited substance.”

Balogh called the statement “completely inaccurate.”

After she was tested Balogh immediately began surfing the internet to find out if there was anything in her body that could produce a positive test. When her research revealed that the testosterone was a banned substance, she then disqualified herself from the race.

“Even though I was taking a substance within my body’s normal hormonal range, that because it was a synthetic, it would not be allowed,” she said.

Balogh initially exercised her right to appeal the hefty penalty for a first-time offender, but withdrew the appeal.

“At the end of the day it was going to cost me in excess of $12,000 and expose significant details of my health history, which as an amateur athlete just didn’t make sense to me,” she said.

Read the full story, including Balogh’s justification for racing under her maiden name after the ban, HERE

RELATED:

From irunfar

On Thursday, March 2, triathlon website 303 Triathlon published an article by Tim Heming stating that Holly Ballogh (née Hancock), a triathlete who had recently been giving a doping suspension by IRONMAN’s Anti-Doping Program, had turned to competing in ultramarathons under her maiden name of Holly Hancock and was entered to race this past Saturday’s Old Pueblo 50 Mile and had previously finished The North Face Endurance Challenge 50 Mile – Utah in September 2016, also registered under her maiden name.

The text of the press release that explains her ban says it is a four-year ban starting on July 11, 2016, which precludes her from racing in “IRONMAN-affiliated competition or any events organized by any other WADA Code Signatory” during that time span.

By end-of-day Thursday, March 2, Holly Balogh (née Hancock) was no longer on the Old Pueblo entrants list. On Friday at 2 p.m., the race administration posted the following to their Facebook page, “I’ve been in touch with US Track and Field and USADA since Tuesday morning. I spoke to the person in question and she has been removed from the entrants list. All this can be verified by contacting Jeff Cook in the legal division at USADA, or you could have just checked the entrants list since Wednesday.” Thus, it seems conclusive that Holly Balogh (née Hancock) didn’t compete this weekend. (iRunFar attempted to contact the race administration on Friday, March 3, but has not received a response as of this publishing).

Given that her ban was announced on February 21, 2017, but that its start date preceded the TNF 50 Mile – Utah race day in September 2016, it looks like her results from that race should be removed as well. To be most precise, it actually looks like Holly Balogh (née Hancock) should not have been allowed to race TNF 50 Mile – Utah because she was already under a provisional suspension and because The North Face Endurance Challenge Series has an anti-doping policy that went into effect in August 2016 that disallows runners under current doping suspensions from participating in their events.

IRONMAN Earns Evergreen Certification

IRONMAN EARNS EVERGREEN LEVEL CERTIFICATION FROM THE COUNCIL FOR RESPONSIBLE SPORT FOR EFFORTS AT IRONMAN BOULDER TRIATHLON

TAMPA, Fla. / EUGENE, Ore. (March 7, 2017) – IRONMAN, a Wanda Sports Holding Company, and The Council for Responsible Sport announced today that, in collaboration with Waste Management (NYSE:WM), IRONMAN has earned the highest possible level of certification—Evergreen—recognizing the successful implementation of socially and environmentally responsible practices at the 2016 IRONMAN® Boulder triathlon. The event earned credits across all five categories of standards including planning and communications, procurement, resource management, access and equity as well as community legacy.

“The Council applauds IRONMAN on the achievement of Evergreen certification for 2016 IRONMAN Boulder,” said Shelley Villalobos, Managing Director of the Council for Responsible Sport. “Staging events in many places poses a challenge for genuine local cooperation, but IRONMAN has shown itself to be a willing partner in working to leave a positive impact on the Boulder community and steward borrowed venues as if they were home.”

Since 2008, the Council for Responsible Sport has certified over 100 sporting events within four levels – Certified, Silver, Gold, and Evergreen. IRONMAN Boulder is in elite company being amongst only nine events to receive the highest (Evergreen) status, and is also the only triathlon to achieve this level of certification. Click on the following link for a look at how the status was earned: https://youtu.be/njRGhitI1Io.

“Achieving this certification is the result of a strong and strategic partnership with the team at Waste Management,” said Cameron O’Connell, Senior Director of Sales for IRONMAN. “With their guidance, we have been able to implement sustainable standards across our event series. Our success with IRONMAN Boulder can now serve as a best-practices example for our company and for race organizers everywhere.”

IRONMAN worked with Waste Management, first, by capturing current environmental initiatives and then by identifying opportunities for improvement and innovation with a focus on IRONMAN Boulder. This led to green initiatives that have now been rolled out across the North American race series, such as utilizing compostable cups at all aid stations and donating leftover nutrition to local food pantries and shelters.

”Waste Management is proud to support IRONMAN on a wide variety of sustainable event programs on its journey to achieve the highest level of certification from the Council for Responsible Sport for the Boulder race,” said Lee Spivak, Senior Associate with Waste Management’s Sustainability Services group. “We are excited to continue this relationship and help IRONMAN grow its sustainability initiatives across all five categories of standards. It was also great for our team to utilize our sustainable event management expertise to help another major event achieve Council certification.”

Highlights from the IRONMAN Boulder triathlon sustainability initiatives included:

Environmental

-  Collected bike inner tubes and tires for reuse through TerraCycle.

-  Reduced waste generation by reusing fencing, flags, finish line materials, tents, signs, inflatable arches and the IRONMAN Village truss from previous IRONMAN events.

-  Collected 64 carbon dioxide canisters from event activities to ensure they were reused instead of ending up in the landfill.

-  Provided a free shuttle service to and from major venues; IRONMAN shuttled close to 10,000 people between locations, reducing about 3,000 vehicle trips in each direction.

-  Reduced the material sent to landfill by asking all vendors to sign a participation agreement so they only use materials for the event that were locally recyclable, compostable or reusable.

-  Measured the total event water use at 14,925 gallons and purchased Water Restoration Certificates from Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF) to restore 50,000 gallons to the Colorado River Basin.

-  Offset 100% of the greenhouse gas emissions from event operations by purchasing 10 MTCO2e through the Colorado Carbon Fund.

Social

-  Donated 5,621 pounds of unused, perishable food and 9,022 pounds of bottled water to Community Food Share in Louisville, Colorado.

-  Engaged children ages 3-15 in the United Healthcare IRONKIDS Boulder Fun Run to include individuals who otherwise might not participate in an IRONMAN race.

Economic

-  The IRONMAN Foundation presented Paradox Sports with a $10,000 Community Grant for a second straight year to support their mission to create adaptive outdoor adventures, such as rock, ice, and mountain climbing for individuals with physical disabilities.

-  IRONMAN encouraged fundraising for a cause through the “Your Journey, Your Cause” initiative. Participants in IRONMAN Boulder raised over $26,000 for their causes in 2016.

-  Waste Management and IRONMAN estimate that the 2016 IRONMAN Boulder race generated an economic impact of approximately $3.9 million.

For more information on the IRONMAN brand and global event series, visit www.ironman.com. For more information on the Council for Responsible Sport, visit www.councilforresponsiblesport.org.

####

About IRONMAN

A Wanda Sports Holdings company, IRONMAN operates a global portfolio of events that includes the IRONMAN® Triathlon Series, the IRONMAN® 70.3® Triathlon Series, 5150TM Triathlon Series, Iron Girl®, IRONKIDS®, six of nine International Triathlon Union World Triathlon Series races, road cycling events including the UCI Velothon Majors Series, mountain bike races, premier marathons and other multisport races. IRONMAN’s events, together with all other Wanda Sports Holdings events, provide more than 680,000 participants annually the benefits of endurance sports through the company’s vast offerings. The iconic IRONMAN® Series of events is the largest participation sports platform in the world. Since the inception of the IRONMAN® brand in 1978, athletes have proven that ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE® by crossing finish lines at the world’s most challenging endurance races. Beginning as a single race, IRONMAN has grown to become a global sensation with more than 260 events across 44 countries. For more information, visit www.ironman.com.

About Wanda Sports Holding

Wanda Sports Holding is the world’s leading sports business entity, founded to capture the opportunities in the global sports industry and to contribute to the prosperous international sports landscape – in three key areas: 1) Spectator Sports (media & marketing business), 2) Participation Sports (active lifestyle business), 3) Services (digital, production and service business). Wanda Sports Holding incorporates the international sports marketing company Infront Sports & Media, the iconic endurance brand IRONMAN, and Wanda Sports China. The headquarters are in Guangzhou, China.

About Waste Management

Waste Management Sustainability Services is a nationwide network of environmental professionals offering sustainability advisory services, environmental and project management experience to help organizations advance along the path towards sustainability. We serve as true collaborators who are there from start to

finish, with full access to the resources, technologies and innovations from the largest environmental solutions provider in North America.

About the Council for Responsible Sport

The Council’s vision is a world where responsibly produced sports events are the norm and its mission is to provide objective, independent verification of the socially and environmentally responsible work event organizers are doing to make a difference in their communities. The current version of the Council’s Certification standards (v.4.2) was developed by an outside working group of both sustainability and sport industry experts, reviewed by a wide range of stakeholders throughout 2013 and implemented in January 2014. www.councilforresponsiblesport.org

Media Contacts:

IRONMAN
Dan Berglund
press@ironman.com; (813) 868-3731

Council for Responsible Sport
Shelley Villalobos, shelley@councilforresponsiblesport.org; (530) 570-2526